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Research Methods - Introduction
 
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In this video, Dr Greg Martin provides an introduction to research methods, methedology and study design. Specifically he takes a look at qualitative and quantitative research methods including case control studies, cohort studies, observational research etc. Global health (and public health) is truly multidisciplinary and leans on epidemiology, health economics, health policy, statistics, ethics, demography.... the list goes on and on. This YouTube channel is here to provide you with some teaching and information on these topics. I've also posted some videos on how to find work in the global health space and how to raise money or get a grant for your projects. Please feel free to leave comments and questions - I'll respond to all of them (we'll, I'll try to at least). Feel free to make suggestions as to future content for the channel. SUPPORT: —————- This channel has a crowd-funding campaign (please support if you find these videos useful). Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_support OTHER USEFUL LINKS: ———————— Channel page: http://bit.ly/GH_channel Subscribe: http://bit.ly/GH_subscribe Google+: http://bit.ly/GH_Google Twitter: @drgregmartin Facebook: http://bit.ly/GH_facebook HERE ARE SOME PLAYLISTS ——————————————- Finding work in Global Health: http://bit.ly/GH_working Epidemiology: http://bit.ly/GH_epi Global Health Ethics: http://bit.ly/GH_ethics Global Health Facts: http://bit.ly/GH_facts WANT CAREER ADVICE? ———————————— You can book time with Dr Greg Martin via Google Helpouts to get advice about finding work in the global health space. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_career -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Know how interpret an epidemic curve?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SM4PN7Yg1s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Research Methodology Course (Self-Study)
 
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This is a research methodology course. It is 80 lessons. Each lesson takes 20 minutes. You can see the lecture notes on my blog http://misresearchmethodologies.blogspot.co.uk and you could subscribe to my facebook group to follow up me http://www.facebook.com/groups/MISResearch/ you could send me questions and I will answer them in the next lesson. If you need one to one help, I charge 40 GBP per hour offer one-to-one help and 2 GBP for reading each page. I do not write (no writing service) to anyone. I just offer counseling. I can help in research methodology, literature review, and analysis. Furthermore, I offer regular meeting with PhD and master students to follow up with them If you are interested please contact me. Skype: amgad_1985
Views: 275234 Amgad Badewi
Research Methodology : Introduction
 
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This Lecture talks about Research Methodology.
Views: 185765 Cec Ugc
Qualitative vs. Quantitative
 
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Let's go on a journey and look at the basic characteristics of qualitative and quantitative research!
Views: 688672 ChrisFlipp
Research Methodology; Lecture 1 (MiniCourse)
 
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2013 Virtual Academy: Research Methodology; Lecture 1 (MiniCourse) Organizer: Krishna Vedula | Presenter: Prasant Mohapatra Presenter Profile: Prasant Mohapatra Professor, Computer Science University of California at Davis From the series of 8 Lectures for Research Methodology, GTU PhD Programme
Views: 221558 Caspo Fugin
What is action research?
 
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Here's a short description of action research. TRANSCRIPT: Teaching is a craft. It’s both an art and a science, which is why great teachers always experiment and make tons of mistakes. But how do you know what’s actually working? One option is action research. Here you can identify a question or problem, test out a strategy, gather data, and determine if it works. The end result is something dynamic, innovative, and tied directly to your classroom. Action research dissolves the barrier between participants and researchers. In other words, the teacher actively participates in the situation while conducting the research. There are many action research frameworks, but they generally follow a similar process: You start out in phase one, planning for research. Phase One: Planning for Research It starts with an inquiry process, where you define a specific research question. It needs to be something you can actually test. Next, you conduct a literature review to gain a deeper understanding of the related research. Finally, you move into the design process, where you determine your data methods, consider ethical issues, get required permissions, create deadlines and set up systems. This is where you engage in multiple cycles of experimentation and data collection. Your data collection might include qualitative data, like observations, artifacts, and interviews or quantitative data like rubric scores, surveys, or achievement data. Phase Three: Analysis You will often start by organizing data with charts or graphs and looking for trends. You might also discuss it with peers, free write in a journal, or create a cluster map before eventually writing out your results. Phase Four: Conclusion This is often where you share your research with the world and reflect on your own practice. This will ultimately lead to new questions . . . and the cycle will continue again as you refine your craft as a better, more creative teacher.
Views: 93009 John Spencer
The analysis of narratives
 
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Examines the use of narratives in speech and in research analysis. Beginning with a look at the range of ways narratives might be analysed such as linguistic, structural and thematic. Attention is then turned to some of the functions of narrative. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Works referred to in the video include: Bury, M (2001) “Illness narratives: Fact or Fiction” Sociology of Health and Illness 23: 263-85 Cortazzi, M (1993) Narrative Analysis. London: Falmer Press. Denzin, N.K. (1989) Interpretive biography. Newbury Park, Calif., London: Sage. Labov, W. (1972) 'The transformation of experience in narrative syntax', in W. Labov (ed), Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 354-396. Lieblich, A., Tuval-Mashiach, R. and Zilber, T. (1998) Narrative Research: Reading, Analysis and Interpretation. London: Sage. Mishler, E.G. (1986) Research Interviewing: Context and Narrative, Cambridge Mass.: Havard University Press Rhodes, C., and Brown, A.D. (2005) “Narrative, Organizations and Research”, International Journal of Management Research, 5: 167-88. Riessman, C.K. (1993) Narrative Analysis. Newbury Park, CA, London: Sage. Credits: Sounds and music: 'Fifth Avenue Stroll' from iLife Sound Effects, http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/ilife09.pdf Image: Freizeitanlage Kräwinklerbrücke, Kräwinklerbrücke in Remscheid by Frank Vincentz, Wikimedia Commons, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Views: 32376 Graham R Gibbs
Sampling & its 8 Types: Research Methodology
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains the meaning of Sampling & Types of Sampling Research Methodology Population & Sample Systematic Sampling Cluster Sampling Non Probability Sampling Convenience Sampling Purposeful Sampling Extreme, Typical, Critical, or Deviant Case: Rare Intensity: Depicts interest strongly Maximum Variation: range of nationality, profession Homogeneous: similar sampling groups Stratified Purposeful: Across subcategories Mixed: Multistage which combines different sampling Sampling Politically Important Cases Purposeful Sampling Purposeful Random: If sample is larger than what can be handled & help to reduce sample size Opportunistic Sampling: Take advantage of new opportunity Confirming (support) and Disconfirming (against) Cases Theory Based or Operational Construct: interaction b/w human & environment Criterion: All above 6 feet tall Purposive: subset of large population – high level business Snowball Sample (Chain-Referral): picks sample analogous to accumulating snow Advantages of Sampling Increases validity of research Ability to generalize results to larger population Cuts the cost of data collection Allows speedy work with less effort Better organization Greater brevity Allows comprehensive and accurate data collection Reduces non sampling error. Sampling error is however added. Population & Sample @2:25 Sampling @6:30 Systematic Sampling @9:25 Cluster Sampling @ 11:22 Non Probability Sampling @13:10 Convenience Sampling @15:02 Purposeful Sampling @16:16 Advantages of Sampling @22:34 #Politically #Purposeful #Methodology #Systematic #Convenience #Probability #Cluster #Population #Research #Manishika #Examrace For IAS Psychology postal Course refer - http://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm For NET Paper 1 postal course visit - https://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm
Views: 266757 Examrace
Epidemiological Studies - made easy!
 
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This video gives a simple overview of the most common types of epidemiological studies, their advantages and disadvantages. These include ecological, case-series, case control, cohort and interventional studies. It also looks at systematic reviews and meta-analysis. This video was created by Ranil Appuhamy Voiceover - James Clark -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer: These videos are provided for educational purposes only. Users should not rely solely on the information contained within these videos and is not intended to be a substitute for advice from other relevant sources. The author/s do not warrant or represent that the information contained in the videos are accurate, current or complete and do not accept any legal liability or responsibility for any loss, damages, costs or expenses incurred by the use of, or reliance on, or interpretation of, the information contained in the videos.
Quantitative Research Designs: Descriptive non-experimental, Quasi-experimental or Experimental?
 
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http://youstudynursing.com/ Get my research terminology eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam **The PDF version of my book is better and is being approved by Google Play right now. For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA0-RMPi7qE&feature=share&list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. First, ask yourself if the researchers did anything to the participants. More specifically, was there an intervention? ...If the answer is yes, there was an intervention, then the study is either a quasi-experimental or experimental. I will tell you how to decide in a moment. If the answer is no, the study is descriptive non-experimental. Sure, you could be more specific in the description of the design, but for the purposes of grouping your research in a literature review this label is often sufficient at an undergraduate level. Descriptive non-experimental studies may also be called observational. Some examples of more specific labels include case control, cohort and correlational studies. ... To find out if the design is experimental ask yourself if it is a randomized controlled trial. Randomized controlled trials are considered the gold standard or "best" possible design (in quantitative research). You may also hear randomized controlled trails referred to as true experiments. However, in the real world it is difficult to conduct a true randomized controlled trial in many situations, which means that a lot of studies are done that are not classified as randomized controlled trials. Randomized control trials have three key components: a random sample, a control group and an intervention. If your study is truly a randomized control trial it should say in the abstract and/or the methods section of the article. If it doesn't say then it is likely that the study is either descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. You can tell the difference by looking into the methods section further. ...If there is no control group than the study is quasi-experimental. A control group is a group of people that enter the study but do not receive the intervention under study. Instead, they are used for the purpose of comparison. If the sample was not randomized properly or adequately or even at all then the study is also quasi-experimental. You may also see this type of study being called a non-randomized trial. ... Sometimes I see students that are confused about the study design because of terms that relate to the length of time the study was conducted or the sampling process. ... Terms like cross-sectional and longitudinal tell you how much time the study was conducted over. Cross sectional means that data were collected at one point in time. Longitudinal means that data were collected over a long period of time. These terms alone will not tell you if the study is descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. If you use these words to describe your study design in the absence of one of the labels we discussed in this video you will not have given your teacher enough information about the study design to properly classify it. Other confusing terms often relate to the way samples were collected, like convenience sampling. Convenience sampling means that the sample was readily available or accessible to the researchers. This term will give you the hint that the study does not have a random sample and is therefore not a randomized controlled trial, but you still need to classify it further as descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. To decide how to classify the design of a study you are looking at, follow the steps outlined in this video. Ask yourself the following three questions: Was there an intervention? Is there a control group? Was the sample random? ...
Views: 177667 NurseKillam
Research Methodology (Part 2 of 3): 14 Types of Research Methods - Where to Apply?
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains the 14 major types of research methods: Basic versus Applied Research Fixed versus Flexible Research Quantitative versus Qualitative Research Experimental versus Non-Experimental Research Causal or Explanatory Research Confirmatory versus exploratory Research Descriptive Research Historical Research Diagnostic Research Prognostic Research Evaluation Research Action Research Ex-post Facto or Casual Comparative Research Correlational Research For IAS Psychology postal Course refer - http://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm Research Methodology playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW9kB_HKs3_N4-55qIi36fwdW2UaySm9Y Framework @0:12 Basic versus Applied @3:24 Fixed versus Flexible @5:19 Quantitative vs. Qualitative @6:04 Experimental vs. Non – Experimental @8:08 Exploratory vs. Confirmatory Research @10:09 Explanatory or Casual Research @12:11 Descriptive Research @13:51 Historical Research @16:24 Ex-post Factor or Casual – Comparative Research @17:56 Correlational Research @19:59 Evaluation Research @21:11 Formative vs. Summative Evaluation @22:39 Diagnostic Research @24:58 Prognostic Research @25:32 Action Research @26:11 Types of Research Problems Addressed @28:03 Research Design @30:09 Research Methodology @30:22 #Longitudinal #Posteriori #Experimental #Questionnaire #Quantitative #Descriptive #Manipulate #Fundamental #Flexible #Methodological #Manishika #Examrace
Views: 237783 Examrace
Case Study
 
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Let's go on a journey and learn how to conduct case studies!
Views: 294686 ChrisFlipp
Research Part 1: Paradigms and Methodology
 
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Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd OR the PDF version on Google Play: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y Please like, subscribe and provide feedback. I am happy to make more videos to help you. If you like this video you can visit the playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 To be notified when new videos are posted please subscribe.
Views: 115384 NurseKillam
Introduction to Statistics..What are they? And, How Do I Know Which One to Choose?
 
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This tutorial provides an overview of statistical analyses in the social sciences. It distinguishes between descriptive and inferential statistics, discusses factors for choosing an analysis procedure, and identifies the difference between parametric and nonparametric procedures.
Views: 215224 The Doctoral Journey
Sociology Research Methods: Crash Course Sociology #4
 
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Today we’re talking about how we actually DO sociology. Nicole explains the research method: form a question and a hypothesis, collect data, and analyze that data to contribute to our theories about society. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** The Dress via Wired: https://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/ Original: http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Robert Kunz, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Jason A Saslow, Rizwan Kassim, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Steve Marshall, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Kyle Anderson, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Yana Leonor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Justin Zingsheim, Andrea Bareis, Moritz Schmidt, Bader AlGhamdi, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 314813 CrashCourse
1.3 Exploratory, Descriptive and Explanatory Nature Of Research
 
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Do you like this video? Check out full course on Udemy only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 89385 MeanThat
What Is Statistics: Crash Course Statistics #1
 
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Welcome to Crash Course Statistics! In this series we're going to take a look at the important role statistics play in our everyday lives, because statistics are everywhere! Statistics help us better understand the world and make decisions from what you'll wear tomorrow to government policy. But in the wrong hands, statistics can be used to misinform. So we're going to try to do two things in this series. Help show you the usefulness of statistics, but also help you become a more informed consumer of statistics. From probabilities, paradoxes, and p-values there's a lot to cover in this series, and there will be some math, but we promise only when it's most important. But first, we should talk about what statistics actually are, and what we can do with them. Statistics are tools, but they can't give us all the answers. Episode Notes: On Tea Tasting: "The Lady Tasting Tea" by David Salsburg On Chain Saw Injuries: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/chainsaws.html https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15027558 https://www.hindawi.com/journals/aem/2015/459697/ Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 372178 CrashCourse
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *it surprises you; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. 3.10. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark This tutorial showed how to focus on segments in the transcripts and how to put codes together and create categories. However, it is important to remember that it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Good luck with your study. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 665690 Kent Löfgren
What Is A Pilot Study In Research PDF?
 
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Za bitstream handle 10500 1648 06chapter5. It can also be a specific pre testing of research instruments, including questionnaires or interview schedules jul 16, 2010 survey to identify the methodological components in registered studies which are described as 'pilot'. Design and analysis of pilot studies wiley online library. The term pilot study is used in two different ways social science research designs do exist for proper interpretation of results after conduct the study? Designing your approach using scientific principles. A practical guide to focus group research taylor & francis online. 256 chapter 5 pilot study 1. Writing down aug 16, 2002 abstract. Introduction the pilot study what is a or feasibility study? A review of biomedsearch. A pilot study is one of the essential stages in a research project. This paper aims to describe the importance of and steps involved in executing a pilot study by is mini version full scale or trial run done preparation complete. The latter is also called a 'feasibility' study. Feasibility' studies a pilot study is preliminary trial of research which essential to the development an extensive training programme. Pilot study doing a pilot study why is it essential? (pdf download available) researchgate 26498016_doing_a_pilot_study_why_is_it _essential one of the essential stages in research project. Step'by step guide to critiquing research. Keywords pilot study, quantitative methodological issues, study is a small scale preliminary conducted in order to evaluate feasibility, good research strategy requires careful planning and will on scientific writing the studystone, lac, editor chief. You may think of it as a miniature version your project. Pilot studies play an important role in health research, but they can be mis suggestions for the analysis of a pilot study, order mar 14, 2016 interview schedule, validation, test, constructs validity,in conduct any good researcher is study used as small scale version or trial run preparation particular research instrument procedures (baker, 1994, pp. A concern in all research universities is the lack of attention and a pdf version this article available here. A pilot study of value information analysis to support research. You may limit it by your finally, the importance of such research for business sector was also demonstrated in this work. In a pilot study the entire training programme is carried out but with fewer participants that would be used for an extensive planning research papers 7. A pilot study vital methodological issues business theory and. Establishing construct validity and reliability pilot nsuworks. A pilot study is a pre of your fuller. Pdf conducting focus group research investigations into students' learning experiences ethical issues are highlighted, the purpose of a pilot study is reviewed, and 1 was that examined change scores in self psychology now getting attention due to its strong link psychological health chapter 9 implementing value
Views: 194 Wen Wen
SPSS for Beginners 1: Introduction
 
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Updated video 2018: SPSS for Beginners - Introduction https://youtu.be/_zFBUfZEBWQ This video provides an introduction to SPSS/PASW. It shows how to navigate between Data View and Variable View, and shows how to modify properties of variables.
Views: 1352945 Research By Design
Writing a research proposal
 
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Writing a research proposal
Views: 565607 DrSamFiala
SPSS Questionnaire/Survey Data Entry - Part 1
 
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How to enter and analyze questionnaire (survey) data in SPSS is illustrated in this video. Lots more Questionnaire/Survey & SPSS Videos here: https://www.udemy.com/survey-data/?couponCode=SurveyLikertVideosYT Check out our next text, 'SPSS Cheat Sheet,' here: http://goo.gl/b8sRHa. Prime and ‘Unlimited’ members, get our text for free. (Only 4.99 otherwise, but likely to increase soon.) Survey data Survey data entry Questionnaire data entry Channel Description: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor For step by step help with statistics, with a focus on SPSS. Both descriptive and inferential statistics covered. For descriptive statistics, topics covered include: mean, median, and mode in spss, standard deviation and variance in spss, bar charts in spss, histograms in spss, bivariate scatterplots in spss, stem and leaf plots in spss, frequency distribution tables in spss, creating labels in spss, sorting variables in spss, inserting variables in spss, inserting rows in spss, and modifying default options in spss. For inferential statistics, topics covered include: t tests in spss, anova in spss, correlation in spss, regression in spss, chi square in spss, and MANOVA in spss. New videos regularly posted. Subscribe today! YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/statisticsinstructor Video Transcript: In this video we'll take a look at how to enter questionnaire or survey data into SPSS and this is something that a lot of people have questions with so it's important to make sure when you're working with SPSS in particular when you're entering data from a survey that you know how to do. Let's go ahead and take a few moments to look at that. And here you see on the right-hand side of your screen I have a questionnaire, a very short sample questionnaire that I want to enter into SPSS so we're going to create a data file and in this questionnaire here I've made a few modifications. I've underlined some variable names here and I'll talk about that more in a minute and I also put numbers in parentheses to the right of these different names and I'll also explain that as well. Now normally when someone sees this survey we wouldn't have gender underlined for example nor would we have these numbers to the right of male and female. So that's just for us, to help better understand how to enter these data. So let's go ahead and get started here. In SPSS the first thing we need to do is every time we have a possible answer such as male or female we need to create a variable in SPSS that will hold those different answers. So our first variable needs to be gender and that's why that's underlined there just to assist us as we're doing this. So we want to make sure we're in the Variable View tab and then in the first row here under Name we want to type gender and then press ENTER and that creates the variable gender. Now notice here I have two options: male and female. So when people respond or circle or check here that they're male, I need to enter into SPSS some number to indicate that. So we always want to enter numbers whenever possible into SPSS because SPSS for the vast majority of analyses performs statistical analyses on numbers not on words. So I wouldn't want and enter male, female, and so forth. I want to enter one's, two's and so on. So notice here I just arbitrarily decided males get a 1 and females get a 2. It could have been the other way around but since male was the first name listed I went and gave that 1 and then for females I gave a 2. So what we want to do in our data file here is go head and go to Values, this column, click on the None cell, notice these three dots appear they're called an ellipsis, click on that and then our first value notice here 1 is male so Value of 1 and then type Label Male and then click Add. And then our second value of 2 is for females so go ahead and enter 2 for Value and then Female, click Add and then we're done with that you want to see both of them down here and that looks good so click OK. Now those labels are in here and I'll show you how that works when we enter some numbers in a minute. OK next we have ethnicity so I'm going to call this variable ethnicity. So go ahead and type that in press ENTER and then we're going to the same thing we're going to create value labels here so 1 is African-American, 2 is Asian-American, and so on. And I'll just do that very quickly so going to Values column, click on the ellipsis. For 1 we have African American, for 2 Asian American, 3 is Caucasian, and just so you can see that here 3 is Caucasian, 4 is Hispanic, and other is 5, so let's go ahead and finish that. Four is Hispanic, 5 is other, so let's go to do that 5 is other. OK and that's it for that variable. Now we do have it says please state I'll talk about that next that's important when they can enter text we have to handle that differently.
Views: 455715 Quantitative Specialists
Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Methods in Research Simplified!
 
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When you are just starting to learn about research it helps to have simple definitions of Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Methods in Research! More videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/youstudynursing https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 188020 NurseKillam
Data Analysis in SPSS Made Easy
 
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Use simple data analysis techniques in SPSS to analyze survey questions.
Views: 790397 Claus Ebster
Measuring Personality: Crash Course Psychology #22
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. How would you measure a personality? What, exactly, is the self? Well, as you've come to expect, it's not that easy to nail down an answer for those questions. Whether you're into blood, bile, earth, wind, fire, or those Buzzfeed questionnaires, there are LOTS of ways to get at who we are and why. -- Table of Contents Trait & Social-Cognitive Personality 01:35:01 Measuring Personality 02:57:03 Who or What is the Self? 09:16:14 How Self Esteem Works 09:42:04 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1648364 CrashCourse
Intro to Hypothesis Testing in Statistics - Hypothesis Testing Statistics Problems & Examples
 
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Get the full course at: http://www.MathTutorDVD.com The student will learn the big picture of what a hypothesis test is in statistics. We will discuss terms such as the null hypothesis, the alternate hypothesis, statistical significance of a hypothesis test, and more. In this step-by-step statistics tutorial, the student will learn how to perform hypothesis testing in statistics by working examples and solved problems.
Views: 1091348 mathtutordvd
Research Part 2: Finding Information in Scholarly Research Articles
 
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Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd OR the PDF version on Google Play: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y http://youstudynursing.com/ Lecture as homework. Please like, subscribe and provide feedback. I am happy to make more videos to help you. If you like this video you can visit the link below for the related playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 To be notified when new videos are posted please subscribe.
Views: 31000 NurseKillam
LPP using [SIMPLEX METHOD ] simple logic with solved problem in Operations Research :-by kauserwise
 
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NOTE: The final answer is (X1=8 and X2=2), by mistaken I took CB values instead of Solution. ▓▓▓▓░░░░───CONTRIBUTION ───░░░▓▓▓▓ If you like this video and wish to support this kauserwise channel, please contribute via, * Paytm a/c : 7401428918 * Paypal a/c : www.paypal.me/kauserwisetutorial [Every contribution is helpful] Thanks & All the Best!!! ─────────────────────────── In this video we can learn Linear Programming problem using Simplex Method using a simple logic with solved problem, hope you will get knowledge in it. To watch more tutorials pls visit: www.youtube.com/c/kauserwise * Financial Accounts * Corporate accounts * Cost and Management accounts * Operations Research Playlists: For Financial accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnojfVAucCUHGmcAay_1ov46 For Cost and Management accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnpgUjlVR-znIRMFVF0A_aaA For Corporate accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnorJc6lonRWP4b39sZgUEhx For Operations Research - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnoLyXr4Y7MzmHSu3bDjLvhu
Views: 2544576 Kauser Wise
SPSS for questionnaire analysis:  Correlation analysis
 
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Basic introduction to correlation - how to interpret correlation coefficient, and how to chose the right type of correlation measure for your situation. 0:00 Introduction to bivariate correlation 2:20 Why does SPSS provide more than one measure for correlation? 3:26 Example 1: Pearson correlation 7:54 Example 2: Spearman (rhp), Kendall's tau-b 15:26 Example 3: correlation matrix I could make this video real quick and just show you Pearson's correlation coefficient, which is commonly taught in a introductory stats course. However, the Pearson's correlation IS NOT always applicable as it depends on whether your data satisfies certain conditions. So to do correlation analysis, it's better I bring together all the types of measures of correlation given in SPSS in one presentation. Watch correlation and regression: https://youtu.be/tDxeR6JT6nM ------------------------- Correlation of 2 rodinal variables, non monotonic This question has been asked a few times, so I will make a video on it. But to answer your question, monotonic means in one direction. I suggest you plot the 2 variables and you'll see whether or not there is a monotonic relationship there. If there is a little non-monotonic relationship then Spearman is still fine. Remember we are measuring the TENDENCY for the 2 variables to move up-up/down-down/up-down together. If you have strong non-monotonic shape in the plot ie. a curve then you could abandon correlation and do a chi-square test of association - this is the "correlation" for qualitative variables. And since your 2 variables are ordinal, they are qualitative. Good luck
Views: 494353 Phil Chan
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
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"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 424319 David Taylor
1&1 Webinar on Micro-randomized Trials (MRTs) With Susan Murphy
 
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Download the slides for this video at http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~samurphy/seminars/MRT1-and-1PennStateWebinar.pdf For more information about MRTs or Susan Murphy's research, please visit methodology.psu.edu. The Methodology Center develops methods for design and data analysis in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. Our design projects include methods for • adaptive interventions, • just-in-time adaptive interventions for mHealth, and • optimizing interventions. Our analysis projects include development and extension of • latent class models, • time-varying effect models, • methods for intensive longitudinal data, and • models for selecting candidate variables in data sets with huge numbers of variables (like genetic data). If you are interested in seeing videos related to any of these topics, please let us know in the comments!
Views: 194 methodsctr
The purpose of pilot studies in modern research
 
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Pilot studies are often viewed as hypothesis testing studies that determine the potential effect size for a larger study. This lecture discusses the potential drawbacks of this approach and talks about the purpose of pilot studies in modern research. A PDF of the slides presented can be found here: https://goo.gl/waw4Ey Part of the "Biostatistics in Action: Tips for Clinical Researchers" lecture series that is sponsored by the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research - Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design resource, which is supported in part by an NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) through its Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (Grant No, UL1TR001873). The speaker, Martina Pavlicova, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Mailman School of Public Health. Sponsored by: The Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research: http://irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/ In affiliation with: The Department of Biostatistics at the Mailman School of Public Health: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/become-student/departments/biostatistics
Views: 236 BERD Education

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