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Body fluids 8, Water balance regulation and homeostasis
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 Levels of body fluid must be tightly regulated.
Views: 51420 Dr. John Campbell
Water Regulation by Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH)
 
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Water Regulation by Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH)/ Antidiuretic Hormone animation/Antidiuretic Hormone mechanism/Antidiuretic Hormone physiology/Antidiuretic Hormone function The hypothalamus produces a polypeptide hormone known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which is transported to and released from the posterior pituitary gland. The principal action of ADH is to regulate the amount of water excreted by the kidneys. As ADH (which is also known as vasopressin) causes direct water reabsorption from the kidney tubules, salts and wastes are concentrated in what will eventually be excreted as urine. The hypothalamus controls the mechanisms of ADH secretion, either by regulating blood volume or the concentration of water in the blood. Dehydration or physiological stress can cause an increase of osmolarity above 300 mOsm/L, which in turn, raises ADH secretion and water will be retained, causing an increase in blood pressure. ADH travels in the bloodstream to the kidneys. Once at the kidneys, ADH changes the kidneys to become more permeable to water by temporarily inserting water channels, aquaporins, into the kidney tubules. Water moves out of the kidney tubules through the aquaporins, reducing urine volume. The water is reabsorbed into the capillaries lowering blood osmolarity back toward normal. As blood osmolarity decreases, a negative feedback mechanism reduces osmoreceptor activity in the hypothalamus, and ADH secretion is reduced. ADH release can be reduced by certain substances, including alcohol, which can cause increased urine production and dehydration.
Views: 31705 Medinaz
Body Fluid Regulation in Body : Fluid and Electrolite
 
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Body Fluid Regulation in Body : Fluid and Electrolite The Fluids in your body are composed of water and dissolved substances, including electrolytes, which are crucial for body function. Please Like, Comment, Share and Subscribe!!! Other video in Human Physiology: Why Can't I Stop Eating? Getting Over Overeating http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edEMzie0sgs 8 Brain Exercises to Keep Your Mind Sharp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCPwd2U0IQM Get Moving : 10 Simple Ways To Be More Active in Life http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwz5ntkWjb0 Physiology of Taste : Mechanism of Taste Reception http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikjuF_eQpcA Anatomy and Physiology of The Eye http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJdieKGCAU8 Anatomy and Physiology : The Mechanism How Hearing Works http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wnJv1Ms66c Anatomy and Physiology of Skeletal Muscle http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6ayIYn8iUM Physiology of Smell : How Smell Works (Olfactory Sensation) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JrjMWoRr8M Structure and Function of Human Respiratory System http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeO5xZ__sl0 Anatomy and Circulation of the Heart http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fQbPMDtLZI
Views: 207 Funny Pictures
Body fluids 1, Fluid compartments
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 How body fluids are compartmentalized
Views: 89680 Dr. John Campbell
Hormones Regulation of Fluids
 
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Here I introduce you to some concepts behind the regulation of fluids in the human body, including electrolytes, regulation of sodium and water balance and much more. But it is only a partial glimpse. I also present an offer for a free trial membership at Simple Nursing that will give you access to some of the full videos on the site! Check out my offer, you will love it! Over 1,200+ Videos – http://simplenursing.com/free-trial-yt 80% NOT on Youtube Simplenursing.com Official website Over 60,000 Nursing Students Helped 82% or Higher Test Average from our Users Go to: http://SimpleNursing.com - Lab Card - ABGs - EKGs - Fluid & Electrolytes FREE - Pharmacology FREE - Cardiac Pathophysiology - PATHO BIBLE "70 Care Plans Done-For-You" Please visit: http://simplenursing.com/get-started for more details on what is included with our memberships. Un-lock the mysteries of how simple nursing school can be.
Views: 1388 Simple Nursing
Overview of Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology (Fluid Compartment)
 
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Where do I get my information from: http://armandoh.org/dig Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members FaberCastell Australia - https://www.youtube.com/user/FaberCastellGroup What markers do I use? FaberCastellPITTartistpens1,5 FaberCastellPITTartistpensF FaberCastellPermanentmarkers FaberCastellPITTartistpensbrush
Views: 26182 Armando Hasudungan
Fluid and Electrolytes: Everything You Need to Know!
 
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__________________________________________________________ FREE NRSNG Nursing Resources: 50 Most Commonly Prescribed Medications - https://bit.ly/2nHIMcV Head to Toe Assessment - https://bit.ly/2vLYZ5A Nursing Care Plan Template - https://bit.ly/2Mh3rDo NRSNG Study Guides: Nursing Pharmacology Study Guide - https://bit.ly/2MhBRGe Fluid and Electrolytes Study Guide - https://bit.ly/2OIFy4t Nursing Lab Values - https://bit.ly/2P92U4p __________________________________________________________ FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL: www.facebook.com/NurseBass1 www.instagram.com/Nurse_Bass www.twitter.com/Nurse_Bass __________________________________________________________ Valuing honesty and integrity, I am an Affiliate of NRSNG.com. Given this, I want you to know that there may occasionally be products or services offered on this channel from which I receive a commission if you make a purchase. You will receive a phenomenal piece of educational material and will help support this channel in the process. If you have any questions regarding the above, please do not hesitate to contact me via email. It can be found on my "About" page. __________________________________________________________ The views and opinions expressed on this channel and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all videos have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this channel and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
Views: 149622 Nurse Bass
Body water balance
 
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ADH and Renin-Angiotensin systems
Views: 11618 Doc K
20150921 Fluid Compartments, Regulation of ECF Volume, Fluid Replacement
 
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Lori Kral M.D. Fluid Compartments, Regulation of ECF Volume, Fluid Replacement Solutions (components of each) B: 327-361 MM: 1107-1139 MM:1 161-9 M: 1767-1810 POW: 1-14
Fluid and Electrolytes - Introduction
 
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EmpoweRN.com Here is a link to my website, for more questions :) http://empowern.com/2015/06/fe/ Stay tuned for more videos! Introduction to: Fluid and Electrolyte Balance Fluid and electrolyte balances are necessary for homeostasis. This presentation and following videos will help you become better aware of how to assist patients in regaining and maintaining homeostasis. We will also discuss normal and abnormal fluid and electrolyte balances, the factors that contribute to imbalances, types of imbalances, and nursing interventions you can use to correct imbalances. Part 1 will focus on “fluid balance” Including: Hypovolemia and hypervolemia and then Part 2 will cover “electrolyte balance” and look at each electrolyte individually. Each of these will be broken down into bit size videos for better understanding and added to a playlist, so that it is easy to find the next video! So…let’s get started! First, we’ll speak to the Importance of Fluid Balance in Our Bodies… Fluid is a major component of our body. It serves a vital role in our health, and in normal cellular function by serving as a medium for metabolic reactions within the cell. It also is the transporter of nutrients and waste products, a lubricant, an insulator, and a shock absorber. Fluid serves as a means of regulating, or maintaining body temperature. Fluids may enter the body through the food we eat and the beverage we drink. Fluids leave the body mainly by the elimination process of urine, feces and through the skin. The amount of water in our bodies declines with age. For instance, a newborn’s body consists of about 75% fluid, while a healthy adult’s body is composed of 60% fluid. 40% of the body’s water is in the Intercellular space which you will see abbreviated as ICF which stands for Intracellular Fluid (ICF). The extracellular fluid which you will see abbreviated as (ECF) accounts for 20% of body weight: 14% in the interstitial space, and 5% in the intravascular space. Transcellular fluid, like the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid contained in other body spaces such as: Joint space, pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial spaces, makes up the remaining 1% of the total ECF Extracellular Fluid. Extracellular and intracellular fluids contain solutes, which are: substances dissolved in the body fluid such as: Dissolved nutrients, waste products and charged particles called ions or electrolytes. Fluid and electrolytes play a vital role in homeostasis which is – the ability of the body or a cell to seek and maintain a condition of equilibrium or stability within its internal environment when dealing with external changes. Homeostasis must exist for the cells to function properly. To maintain homeostasis, fluids move between compartments through selectively permeable membranes by a variety of methods such as: Diffusion Active transport Filtration and Osmosis, whenever there is a need for readjustment caused by external stimuli. The fluid in each compartment has to be stable or be maintained in specific limits because deviation outside these limits creates a fluid imbalance and can result in serious or life-threatening consequences. Fluid imbalances can either be isotonic or osmolar. Isotonic imbalance is when water and electrolytes are lost or gained in equal proportion, thus osmolality of the body fluids remains constant. Osmolar imbalance involves the loss or gain of only water, so that osmolality is altered. The word osmolar means the measure of solute concentration. Solutes include particles like electrolytes. One thing to know when you are learning fluid and electrolytes: “Iso” such as Isotonic - the value is considered to have the same solute concentration of blood. However, when you see: when you see - Hypo with an O - the value is considered lower than normal And when you see Hyper with ER - the value is considered to be higher than normal. For example: Hyperkalemia - means elevated potassium levels, when compared to normal values and the opposite hypokalemia means low potassium levels when compared to normal values. And
Views: 125500 EmpoweRN
Water Balance Homeostasis
 
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Views: 7039 Drake Gardner
CBSE Class 11 Biology, Body Fluids and Circulation – 5, Regulation of Cardiac Activity
 
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CBSE Class 11 Biology, Body Fluids and Circulation – 5, Regulation of Cardiac Activity. This is the animated lesson with explanation which is very interesting and easy to understand way of learning. For Math 11 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqzqhANZbCnKTh5xvQXUMKQ Biology 11 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBer1sk9r4j7KqLm3Zc9nwSSE Chemistry 11 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoySiHE6MTZOWQGpEhD5tnR Physics 11 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqSWcTJGsBtnlUxENW-Ki_w Math 12 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqHG4GbXSckXoJ7EhH6LR1x Biology 12 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeon8ZHV7wr5FODAH2kGwEpR Chemistry 12 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBerucfu000AYIqZdRU1duNXQ Physics 12 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepdhGCSA5OoVPha83vKJePl CBSE 9 Science https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqeFVeIUv1gpIy2B-K8qt6f CBSE 9 Math https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepHfDT2Ggc5iFvLe3qOe_kr CBSE Economics 9 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqSsmadWRfA3AQG003bEncu CBSE Geography 9 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoChqrPqVCdNVr6SmjQo0AW CBSE Civics 9 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBerAn19cRU32xYbGNF9TKDfj CBSE 9 History https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBerR7LzNdmL3_TaQjJnSzyk2 Cbse 10 Math https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBerJgXx10U12DHnH4xl07c6F CBSE 10 Science https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoj5i-MeemU6KT92arFF8Rh CBSE Economics 10 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoxLlTVNtNmG7kz41E5psKQ CBSE Geography 10 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeq4tGevNPhZ9EV3hwMOM5BO CBSE History 10 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBer3xvSgELCNeltWGNAuU14o CBSE 10 Civics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeofq8srL7tkfSwHND9gcazz ICSE Class 9 Physics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepE9kPFh91n3xuTdiI5R_Wu ICSE Class 9 Biology https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepI2jYs4U5N1MterKuIt9c2 ICSE 9 Math https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqFlJbxYnkNm_ULSukMB7mW ICSE 9 Chemistry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBep8pKH_vRfmyaHm3b_dTY43 ICSE 10 Math https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqU7qvdpJZ0c7q-7Y9yvmxw ICSE 10 Chemistry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepbD3QX1m3t5AlHpHOYkvTF ICSE 10 Physics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBernBjoyDG4ffsP3CwJPvFgA ICSE 10 Biology https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqfHm8AExg-CLHoFnHqXO_u MS Word https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepdnqzwbBfTDxAPoDkSIwbq MS Excel https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeq-sMjZ9qGJguQr8ZRh1m6r MS PowerPoint https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqah1zrlROsg-wCzkoSuzlS Tally https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeodV_uPC0ODephvj8sTUCqc Internet https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqW_W1VRsIF4r-rCczVXU6l Flash Animation https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoIz-jGNe0j4Jxn9wdQgufW Java Program https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeqtKkWl3goDKUvMOVqgbyKA C Programming https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepNrZTlVaLEMB6FCL75qK-_ General Knowledge https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBepXyfrrUlxrGkSpu1RlrzIc Brain Power https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNz32RYOjBeoyM4My0CEyA7hS77NeJoaa For Channel Click https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe5YkOlh2sy_JdRUDfge-lQ For Face book https://www.facebook.com/shikshahouse For Twitter https://twitter.com/shikshahouse For any query and explanation please write [email protected]
Views: 6768 Shiksha House
Temperature Regulation of the Human Body | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Have you ever wondered why you sweat when you get too hot from running or shiver on a cold winter's day in this video we are going to explain why your body behaves like this.  Humans are endotherms and this means we are warm blooded we keep our body operating at thirty seven degrees Celsius regardless of the external conditions however this is a real challenge as our environment changes all the time depending on the weather, our clothes, if we are inside by the fire or outside having a snowball fight. So how does this work? It's quite similar to the heating system in a house. in a house is a thermostat that measures the temperature if the house gets cold the thermostat will tell the radiators to turn on and heat it up if it's too hot they will be told to switch off simple.  Your body works in just the same way here in your brain as a special area called the hypothalamus and it measures the temperature of the blood flowing through it and also it collects information from temperatures senses around the body. it then decides if the temperature is too hot or too cold and we'll try and bring it back to thirty seven degrees Celsius. If you are too hot the hypothalamus can then send signals out to the body by the nervous system that can cause barriers to fact. It can send a signal to your skin and cool sweat glands to secrete the sweat on to the surface of the skin the sweat itself is not cold but it works because it takes the heat away from your body in order to evaporate it. Another way of losing is vasodilation let kind of these blood vessels narrows this. That said the skin open white and allow blood to flow through them. They heat is radiated from the blood into the air and the blood cools down. If you get too cold you can do the opposite with these blood vessels and place them on keeping the blood away from the surface of the skin this is called vasoconstriction this is when your muscles contract in order to make. Another fact you may have noticed when you are cold against them. If you look more place the at least the Bulls what you realized is that each of the little bugger has a has to hit out at.  These has stood up on and struck a layer of air around the skin air is a fantastic insulate of heat and this will keep you nice and warm. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Homeostasis 1, Physiological Principles
 
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If you would like to get hold of my books, one on Physiology and another on Pathophysiology, check out my web site campbellteaching.co.uk Funds from selling books helps to finance distribution of resources to students in poorer countries. Homeostasis Introduction Homeo - same Stasis -- standing still Dynamic equilibrium Disruptors Detectors Control system Effectors Body made of billions of cells All dependent on on-going complex biochemistry Depends on a finely tuned environment Constant energy production, nutrients, vitamins, amino acids, glucose, oxygen New nutrients supplies, just right amounts. Removal of waste products or cells will die. Selective removal of many components. Examples Fluid and electrolytes Body temperature Blood pressure Blood oxygenation Red cell volumes Endocrine hormone regulation Blood sugar, blood nutrients Toxin elimination
Views: 137345 Dr. John Campbell
♋♋♋ what changes fluid and electrolyte balance within the body ♋♋♋
 
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Fluid and Electrolytes made incredibly easy - http://amzn.to/2iWYmRi Electrolytes are electrically charged molecules that serve various functions in the body. Some common electrolytes, such as potassium, sodium and calcium, play important roles in nerve conduction, muscle contraction and heart rhythm. Electrolyte levels are also important in maintenance of the body’s fluid balance. Several conditions can cause electrolyte imbalances. Kidney Disease The kidneys are the organs most involved in the maintenance of proper fluid and electrolyte balance. the kidneys filter electrolytes from the blood, excreting excess levels of these molecules and reabsorbing others that are needed. Dehydration Dehydration can affect electrolyte levels. Sodium level, in particular, can be adversely affected. Gastroenteritis, or the stomach flu, can lead to dehydration and hyponatremia, or low sodium levels in the blood, when the body loses too much of this electrolyte during illness. Decreased intake of fluids can lead to dehydration and high sodium levels, as the concentration of this electrolyte increases in the absence of water. Dehydration due to heat exposure and high temperatures can decrease the levels of electrolytes, which are lost through sweat. Adrenal Problems The adrenals, a pair of triangle-shaped glands located atop each kidney, secrete hormones involved in the body’s stress response, sexual development and fluid balance. The main adrenal hormone involved in electrolyte balance is aldosterone. Medicines Certain medicines can affect electrolyte levels. Diuretics, used to control high blood pressure, work by increasing the excretion of sodium and water in the urine. kaplan nclex review hurst nclex review excel nclex review comprehensive nclex review
Views: 6381 1,475,261 Views
Aldosterone and ADH | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Find out how Aldosterone and ADH cause changes in volume and osmolarity. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-gastrointestinal-system/rn-the-gastrointestinal-system/v/meet-the-gastrointestinal-tract?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/adh-effects-on-blood-pressure?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 408293 khanacademymedicine
Body Fluid Compartments
 
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Views: 15983 Farid Youssef
Regulation of pH of body fluids
 
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Subject : Food and Nutrition Paper: Human Physiology
Views: 106 Vidya-mitra
Body fluids 2, Movement between fluid compartments
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 Cells of a tissue are bathed in tissue fluid. This is essential to keep the cells moist and to prevent them drying out. In addition, tissue fluid is the essential medium for diffusion between the blood and capillaries. Substances diffuse from the blood, through the tissue fluid, before reaching and diffusing into cells. The same is true for substances the cells excrete. These waste products must diffuse into the tissue fluid before they can diffuse through the capillary wall into the blood. It is the capillaries which are responsible for the formation of the tissue fluid. At the arteriole end of the capillary, because the blood has recently left the arterial system, the blood pressure is still relatively high. Because the pressure in the capillary is greater than in the tissue fluid, water molecules, which are small enough to fit through the capillary pores, are forced out from the capillary blood into the tissue spaces. Larger components of the blood such as cells and plasma proteins, which are big molecules, remain in the capillaries. Once formed, tissue fluid bathes and flows over the individual tissue cells. At the venous end of a capillary blood pressure is lower because the blood is nearing the lower pressure venous system. Because blood plasma contains large protein molecules, the plasma generates an osmotic potential which tends to draw in water. At the venous end of the capillary, the osmotic potential is greater than the blood pressure which is trying to force water molecules out of the capillary. The net effect of this is that water molecules are osmotically drawnback into the blood at the venous end of the capillary. The overall result of this process of tissue fluid formation and reabsorption is that there is a flow of fresh tissue fluid over the tissue cells, from the arterial to the venous end of the capillary. This flow helps keep tissue cells nourished and oxygenated as well as removing toxic waste products. When the levels of protein in the blood are very low, such as in severe malnutrition, the plasma is no longer able to generate the osmotic potential required to reabsorb tissue fluid. This is why people with severe protein deficiencies develop oedema (the retention of fluid in the tissues).
Views: 63591 Dr. John Campbell
Hormones in body fluid homestasis (ADH/vasopressin, Aldosterone and Natriuretic peptides)
 
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Where do I get my information from: http://armandoh.org/resource Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members FaberCastell Australia - https://www.youtube.com/user/FaberCastellGroup What markers do I use? FaberCastellPITTartistpens1,5 FaberCastellPITTartistpensF FaberCastellPermanentmarkers FaberCastellPITTartistpensbrush
Views: 13446 Armando Hasudungan
What is OSMOREGULATION? What does OSMOREGULATION mean? OSMOREGULATION meaning & explanation
 
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What is OSMOREGULATION? What does OSMOREGULATION mean? OSMOREGULATION meaning - OSMOREGULATION definition - OSMOREGULATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Osmoregulation is the active regulation of the osmotic pressure of an organism's body fluids to maintain the homeostasis of the organism's water content; that is, it maintains the fluid balance and the concentration of electrolytes (salts in solution) to keep the fluids from becoming too diluted or too concentrated. Osmotic pressure is a measure of the tendency of water to move into one solution from another by osmosis. The higher the osmotic pressure of a solution, the more water tends to move into it. Pressure must be exerted on the hypertonic side of a selectively permeable membrane to prevent diffusion of water by osmosis from the side containing pure water. Organisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments must maintain the right concentration of solutes and amount of water in their body fluids; this involves excretion (getting rid of metabolic nitrogenous wastes and other substances such as hormones that would be toxic if allowed to accumulate in the blood) through organs such as the skin and the kidneys. Two major types of osmoregulation are osmoconformers and osmoregulators. Osmoconformers match their body osmolarity to their environment actively or passively. Most marine invertebrates are osmoconformers, although their ionic composition may be different from that of seawater. Osmoregulators tightly regulate their body osmolarity, maintaining constant internal conditions. They are more common in the animal kingdom. Osmoregulators actively control salt concentrations despite the salt concentrations in the environment. An example is freshwater fish. The gills actively uptake salt from the environment by the use of mitochondria-rich cells. Water will diffuse into the fish, so it excretes a very hypotonic (dilute) urine to expel all the excess water. A marine fish has an internal osmotic concentration lower than that of the surrounding seawater, so it tends to lose water and gain salt. It actively excretes salt out from the gills. Most fish are stenohaline, which means they are restricted to either salt or fresh water and cannot survive in water with a different salt concentration than they are adapted to. However, some fish show a tremendous ability to effectively osmoregulate across a broad range of salinities; fish with this ability are known as euryhaline species, e.g., Flounder. Flounder have been observed to inhabit two utterly disparate environments—marine and fresh water—and it is inherent to adapt to both by bringing in behavioral and physiological modifications. Some marine fish, like sharks, have adopted a different, efficient mechanism to conserve water, i.e., osmoregulation. They retain urea in their blood in relatively higher concentration. Urea damages living tissues so, to cope with this problem, some fish retain trimethylamine oxide. This provides a better solution to urea's toxicity. Sharks, having slightly higher solute concentration (i.e., above 1000 mOsm which is sea solute concentration), do not drink water like fresh water fish. While there are no specific osmoregulatory organs in higher plants, the stomata are important in regulating water loss through evapotranspiration, and on the cellular level the vacuole is crucial in regulating the concentration of solutes in the cytoplasm. Strong winds, low humidity and high temperatures all increase evapotranspiration from leaves. Abscisic acid is an important hormone in helping plants to conserve water—it causes stomata to close and stimulates root growth so that more water can be absorbed. Plants share with animals the problems of obtaining water but, unlike in animals, the loss of water in plants is crucial to create a driving force to move nutrients from the soil to tissues. Certain plants have evolved methods of water conservation. Xerophytes are plants that can survive in dry habitats, such as deserts, and are able to withstand prolonged periods of water shortage. Succulent plants such as the cacti store water in the vacuoles of large parenchyma tissues. Other plants have leaf modifications to reduce water loss, such as needle-shaped leaves, sunken stomata, and thick, waxy cuticles as in the pine. The sand-dune marram grass has rolled leaves with stomata on the inner surface.....
Views: 5394 The Audiopedia
Homeostasis 2, Fluid Balance
 
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If you would like to get hold of my books, one on Physiology and another on Pathophysiology, check out my web site campbellteaching.co.uk Funds from selling books helps to finance distribution of resources to students in poorer countries. Cells, tissues and fluids In an average adult body there is approximately 42 litres of water, comprising around 60% of body weight. Most water, normally around 28 litres, is found inside the cells which comprise the body. Although in reality this water is located in billions of individual cells it is collectively referred to as the intracellular compartment. The remaining 14 litres of the fluid in the body is located outside the cells so is termed extracellular fluid. Total blood volume in an adult is usually about 5 litres. This is located in the heart and various blood vessels, a space collectively referred to as the vascular compartment. However, only 3 litres of the blood volume is made up of water, the other 2 litres are blood cells. This leaves approximately 11 litres of extracellular fluid which is located in the tissues. This tissue or interstitial fluid is located in the interstitial compartment which in reality is in all of the tissue spaces of the body.
Views: 35302 Dr. John Campbell
Fluid and Electrolite System Body Fluids
 
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The Fluids in your body are composed of water and dissolved substances, including electrolytes, which are crucial for body function Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Translated titles: Fluidos corporales del sistema fluido y electrolito سوائل جسم النظام السائل و electrolite তরল এবং ইলেক্ট্রোলাইট সিস্টেম শরীরের তরল द्रव र इलेक्ट्रोलाइट सिस्टम शरीर तरल पदार्थ سیال اور الیکٹریکلائٹ سسٹم جسم سیال Fluid- und Elektrolytsystem-Körperflüssigkeiten तरल पदार्थ और इलेक्ट्रोलाइट सिस्टम बॉडी तरल पदार्थ Vloeistof- en elektrolietstelsel liggaamsvloeistowwe Likido at electrolite system fluids sa katawan 유체 및 일렉트로 라이트 시스템 체액
Views: 20602 Human Physiology
Electrolyte Homeostasis Part 1 Electrolyte Balance, Fluid Movement Water, Sodium, Potassium Ion Pump
 
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Electrolyte Homeostasis Part 1: Electrolyte Balance, Fluid Movement (Water, Sodium, Potassium Ion Pump), Fluid Movement Between Interstitial Fluid and Plasma, Bulk Flow, Edema The fluid surrounding the cells in the body must maintain a specific concentration of electrolyte for the cells to function properly. The goal for this topic are - To recognize that electrolyte must be maintained in a narrow concentration range in order for cells to function properly - To examine in general how electrolyte composition of fluid compartments are maintained - To learn the importance of sodium, potassium and calcium homeostasis - To learn the consequences of disturbances of sodium, potassium, and calcium homeostasis - To examine how fluid movement is regulated in the body Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings Translated titles: Elektrolyt-Homöostase Teil 1 Elektrolyt-Gleichgewicht, Flüssigkeit Bewegung Wasser, Natrium, Kalium इलेक्ट्रोलाइट होमियोस्टेसिस भाग 1 इलेक्ट्रोलाइट संतुलन, द्रव आंदोलन पानी, सोडियम, पोटेशियम आयन पंप Elektrolyt homeostase deel 1 elektrolyt balans, vloeistof beweging water, natrium, kalium ionpomp Electrolyte homeostasis part 1 electrolyte balance, fluid movement water, sodium, potassium ion pump 전해질 항상성 제 1 부 전해질 균형, 유체 이동수, 나트륨, 칼륨 이온 펌프 Electrolito homeostasis parte 1 equilibrio de electrolitos, agua de movimiento de fluidos, sodio, جزء 1 التوازن الكهربائي بالكهرباء ، توازن الماء السائل ، الصوديوم ، مضخة أيونات البوتاسيوم ইলেক্ট্রোলাইট হোমোয়েস্টেসিস অংশ 1 ইলেক্ট্রোলাইট ব্যালেন্স, তরল আন্দোলন জল, সোডিয়াম, পটাসিয়াম इलेक्ट्रोलाइट होमोस्टासिस भाग 1 इलेक्ट्रोलाइट बैलेंस, तरल पदार्थ आंदोलन पानी, सोडियम, पोटेशियम आयन الیکٹرولی ہومسٹاسس حصہ 1 الیکٹرروائٹ توازن، سیال تحریک پانی، سوڈیم، پوٹاشیم آئن پمپ
Views: 14185 Human Physiology
Biology: Regulation in Plants
 
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http://www.mindbites.com/lesson/4196 for full video
Views: 1266 Mindbitesdotcom
Homeostasis and Regulation of Body Fluid and Electrolyte by the Kidneys
 
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In this video lecture, educator explains general facts about different fluids present in human body. Kidneys play many function in human body. The internal structure of kidney consists of cortex, medulla and pelvis. Then educator describes different terms of renal physiology. Nephrons have various types and parts. Formation of urine is filtration and reabsorption of produced filtrates must occur. Stream other lectures in the subject of Medical Physiology on sqadia.com https://www.sqadia.com/categories/physiology
Views: 47 sqadia.com
Homeostasis of Extracellular Fluid
 
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Homeostasis depends on the equilibrium of extracellar fluid - a perfect balance of concentration of oxygen, electrolytes, proteins, etc.
Views: 25685 Andrew Wolf
Sodium Regulation: Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS)
 
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This lesson explores how the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) regulates blood pressure (i.e., effective circulating volume). In particular, how effective circulating volume (ECF) is monitored by baroreceptors, how sympathetic activation of granular cells leads to synthesis and release of renin, how renin leads to the formation of angiotensin II, the role of angiotensin II and sodium regulation and blood pressure, how aldosterone stimulates sodium reabsorption along the collecting duct. For help preparing for an exam on this and other topics, visit http://www.aniveo.com
Views: 14673 Lance Miller, PhD
Body Fluid Compartments
 
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In this video lecture, educator describes the Introduction to Compartment functions, Regulation of body fluid volume, Constituents of the extracellular fluid, Acid-base balance, and Control of fluid exchange between extracellular and intracellular compartments. Water loss by the kidneys is most important means to balance between water and electrolyte intake and output. Urine volume can be as low as 0.5 L/day in a dehydrated person or as high as 20 L/day in a person who has been drinking tremendous amounts of water. Adjusting the excretion rate to match precisely the intake of these substances, as well as compensating for excessive losses of fluids and electrolytes that occur in certain diseases. Ionic Composition of Plasma and Interstitial Fluid Is Similar. Osmosis is the net diffusion of water across a selectively permeable membrane from a region of high water concentration to one that has a lower water concentration. The total number of particles in a solution is measured in osmoles. One osmole is equal to 1 mole (6.02 x 10^23) of solute particles. If a molecule dissociates into two ions such as sodium chloride ionizing to give chloride and sodium ions, then a solution containing 1 mol/L will have an osmolar concentration of 2 osm/L. 1 mole of glucose in each litre has a concentration of 1 osm/L. Likewise, a solution that contains 1 mole of a molecule that dissociates into three ions, such as sodium sulphate (Na2SO4), will contain 3 osm/L. Thus, the term osmole refers to the number of osmotically active particles in a solution rather than to the molar concentration. In general, the osmole is too large a unit for expressing osmotic activity of solutes in the body fluids the term milliosmole (mOsm), which equals 1/1000 osmole, is commonly used. Osmolality when concentration is expressed as osmoles per kilogram of water. Osmolarity when concentration is expressed as osmoles per litre of solution. Osmotic pressure is the precise amount of pressure required to prevent the osmosis. Excess fluid accumulation in the extracellular spaces causes abnormal leakage of fluid from the plasma to the interstitial spaces across the capillaries and failure of the lymphatics to return fluid from the interstitium back into the blood. Increased capillary pressure may cause excessive kidney retention of salt and water, high venous pressure and venous constriction, failure of venous pumps and decreased arteriolar resistance. Decreased plasma proteins may cause loss of proteins in urine (nephrotic syndrome), Loss of protein from denuded skin areas and failure to produce proteins. Increased capillary permeability Immune reactions that cause release of histamine and other immune products, toxins, bacterial infections, vitamin deficiency especially vitamin C, prolonged ischemia and burns. Blockage of lymph return to cancer, infections (e.g., filaria nematodes), surgery and congenital absence or abnormality of lymphatic vessels. Stream other lectures in the subject of Medical Physiology on sqadia.com https://www.sqadia.com/categories/physiology
Views: 245 sqadia.com
Fluid and Electrolytes: Sodium
 
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EmpoweRN.com Nursing exam/NCLEX Style questions! 4. The nurse notes that the following clients are at risk for hyponatremia, except? A. A 5-year old child with SIADH B. A 30-year old pregnant woman with oxytocin infusion C. A 68-year old male with Congestive Heart Failure D. A 22-year old female with Diabetes Insipidus Ans.: D. The client with diabetes insipidus is more prone to sodium excess (hypernatremia) rather than hyponatremia. All other clients are prone to hyponatremia due to loss of sodium with either use of diuretics, medication that causes water retention, and adrenal insufficiency. 6. A client with Addison’s disease is presenting shallow respirations, agitation, tremors and hyperactive deep tendon reflexes. Which of the following laboratory result would justify these signs and symptoms? A. Cl 63 mEq/L B. Na 155 mEq/L C. Mg 2 mg/dL D. Ca 9.5 mg/dL Ans.: A. Hypochloremia in Addison’s disease together with a decrease in sodium, increase in pH, increase in serum bicarbonate and increase in total carbon dioxide content would justify the symptoms presented by this client. 14. A client with hypertension is advised by his cardiologist to follow the DASH diet. The nurse knows that DASH is an acronym for which of the following? A. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension B. Decrease Amount of Sodium for Hypertension C. Dietary Allowances of Sodium for Hypertension D. Diet for Americans to Stop Hypertension Ans.: A. The DASH diet or the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension was implemented to better manage hypertension. It is originally a multicenter randomized control-feeding trial that evaluated managing hypertension through dietary means.
Views: 69858 EmpoweRN
Fluid and Electrolite Regulation in Body : Water Homeostasis
 
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Fluid and Electrolite Regulation in Body : Water Homeostasis Fluid and Electrolite System Water Homeostasis The body maintains a balance of water intake and output by a series of negative feedback loops involving the e.... Please Like, Comment, Share and Subscribe!!! Other video in Human Physiology: Why Can't I Stop Eating? Getting Over Overeating http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edEMzie0sgs 8 Brain Exercises to Keep Your Mind Sharp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCPwd2U0IQM Get Moving : 10 Simple Ways To Be More Active in Life http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwz5ntkWjb0 Physiology of Taste : Mechanism of Taste Reception http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikjuF_eQpcA Anatomy and Physiology of The Eye http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJdieKGCAU8 Anatomy and Physiology : The Mechanism How Hearing Works http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wnJv1Ms66c Anatomy and Physiology of Skeletal Muscle http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6ayIYn8iUM Physiology of Smell : How Smell Works (Olfactory Sensation) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JrjMWoRr8M Structure and Function of Human Respiratory System http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeO5xZ__sl0 Anatomy and Circulation of the Heart http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fQbPMDtLZI
Views: 79 Funny Pictures
Chapter 20 - Fluid and Electrolyte Balance
 
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The Human Body in Health & Disease, Thibodeau. Chapter 19 Vodcast MCO 150: Medical Specialties & Pathophysiology Central Maine Community College Taught by: Sarah Varney, RN, BSN, CCRN
Views: 48224 Sarah Varney
Acid Base Balance, Animation.
 
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Acid base regulation basics, pulmonary regulation and renal handling of acid-base balance. This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here : https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/urology ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by Sue Stern. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: https://www.patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia/posts All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. pH is an indicator of acidity. The body’s blood pH is strictly regulated within a narrow range between 7.35 and 7.45. This is because even a minor change in acidity may have devastating effects on protein stability and biochemical processes. Normal cellular metabolism constantly produces and excretes carbon dioxide into the blood. Carbon dioxide combines with water to make carbonic acid which dissociates into hydrogen ions and bicarbonate. This equilibrium is central to understand acid-base regulation. CONTINUED carbon dioxide production by all cells of the body drives the equilibrium to the right to generate more hydrogen ions. Because pH is basically a function of hydrogen ion concentration, more hydrogen means higher acidity and lower pH. Normal metabolism, therefore, constantly makes the blood more acidic. The body must react to keep the blood pH within the normal limits. This is achieved by 2 mechanisms: - Elimination of carbon dioxide through exhalation. The amount of carbon dioxide exhaled by the lungs is regulated in response to changes in acidity. A decrease in pH is sensed by central or arterial chemoreceptors and leads to deeper, faster breathing; more carbon dioxide is exhaled, less hydrogen is made, blood acidity decreases and blood pH returns to normal. Pulmonary regulation is fast, usually effective within minutes to hours. - Excretion of hydrogen ions and reabsorption of bicarbonate through the kidneys. The kidneys control blood pH by adjusting the amount of excreted acids and reabsorbed bicarbonate. Renal regulation is slower; it usually takes days to respond to pH disturbances. Pathologic changes may cause acid-base disturbances. Acidosis refers to a process that causes increased acidity, while alkalosis refers to one that causes increased alkalinity. It’s not uncommon for a patient to have several processes going on at once, some of them in opposite directions. The resulting plasma pH may be normal; too acidic, called acidemia; or too basic, called alkalemia. Acidosis may result from inadequate function of the lungs which causes arterial carbon dioxide to accumulate. This is RESPIRATORY acidosis. On the other hand, METABOLIC acidosis may result from excessive production of metabolic acids, decreased ability of the kidneys to excrete acids, ingestion of acids, or loss of alkali. Metabolic acidosis is characterized by primary decrease in plasma bicarbonate.
Views: 111261 Alila Medical Media
Body fluids (Nursing Science By Tarun Saini)
 
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basics of body fluids
Views: 12172 Tarun Saini Lectures
AP Biology Lecture 6: Body Fluid Regulation and Excretory System
 
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Body Fluid Regulation and Excretory System
Views: 21 ThatBioDude
NEET / AIIMS 2019 - Human Physiology: Body fluids & Circulation Lecture - 8
 
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1. Double circulation 2. Pulmonary circulation 3. Systemic circulation 4. Control of Heart 5. Neural control on heart 6. Chemical control of heart 7. Heart diseases 8. Hypertension 9. Coronary artery disease 10. Angina pectoris 11. Heart failure
Cardiac Cycle - Body Fluids and Circulation- Class XI (Meritnation.com)
 
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Visit http://www.meritnation.com for more videos for your class! Body Fluids and Circulation Blood Lymph (Tissue Fluid) Circulatory Pathways Double Circulation Regulation of Cardiac Activity Disorders of Circulatory System Multimedia Video Tutorials for Class 11 CBSE, ICSE & State Boards students by http://www.Meritnation.com, India's leading online education portal for students of classes 1-12. See how you can use Meritnation's Multimedia Resources, Practice Tests, Interactive Exercises & Expert Help to score high in school.
Views: 171867 Meritnation
Acid-base balance: The physiology
 
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This a brief overview and explanation of the acid-base balance physiology and mechanisms of maintaining it. For the slides and notes please visit: https://www.letstalkmed.com/vid-acid-base-physiology If you have any questions or comments please contact us through: [email protected]
Views: 88528 Lets Talk Medicine
√ Salt and Water Concentrations in Blood | Biology
 
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#iitutor #Biology #ChemicalCompositionOf Blood https://www.iitutor.com In this video: Salt and water balance in the bloodstream, Osmoreceptors, Anti-diuretic Hormone, and Aldosterone Hormone. To maintain the water concentration in our blood, you must drink 2.0 L of water a day or obtain these fluids from our food. For example foods high in water include: Watermelon, Zucchini Cucumber, Most fruits and Vegetables. We lose 2 L of water per day through perspiration, urine, exhaled air and exercise. A drop in fluid intake will cause thirst. A drop in fluid beyond 10% of body mass can cause death. A decrease in the concentration of sodium ions in the bloodstream leads to a decrease in blood volume. This can cause many symptoms including fatigue, nausea, thirst and feeling faint. When you eat salty foods such as chips, what do you feel like doing after? Often people feel thirsty and want to drink water. This is to even out the salt and water balance. Water is drawn to salt. Water is a really good solvent which means it likes to dissolve substances, like salt. Water is attracted to salt. So when there is a high salt concentration in the body, from foods, you will also experience more water retention. When there are more salts present in the bloodstream, there will also be a higher amount of water retention. This is why on some diets, a tactic is to cut the salt out completely – the weight you may lose is water. This is not a healthy way to lose weight as water is needed in the body – and also salt in moderation. An osmoreceptor is a sensory receptor primarily found in the hypothalamus of most endothermic organisms that detect changes in osmotic pressure. Osmoreceptors detect changes in the blood water and salt concentrations in body cells and tissues. The hypothalamus detects in the blood a decreased amount of water by an increase in blood concentration (thicker blood). When we become dehydrated, by decreasing water intake or increasing water loss, water is lost from our bloodstream. This increases it is osmotic pressure and the cells become hypertonic. Water levels are unbalanced when cells are hypertonic. More water (and potentially salt – if levels are low) is needed to balance the cells. If salt is inside the cell, water will follow. We aim for our cells to have an isotonic balance. An equal amount of water on each side so cells are nourished, but not overfull. If you consume too much water it can be detrimental to your body as it puts the cells under stress with too much water. When under this amount of pressure cells can burst (and therefore die). When we become dehydrated (by sweating for example), it causes the blood to be more concentrated (thicker) which pulls water into the blood from the cells as the osmotic pressure has increased. The cells of the hypothalamus shrink. This is when the hypothalamus sends a message to the pituitary gland to release more Antidiuretic Hormone into the blood. The hypothalamus also sends a message to make you feel thirsty. Drinking water is a behavioural response that decreases osmotic pressure. Adjustments to the concentration of water and salts within the urine takes place mainly in the distal parts of the kidney tubules and the collecting tubules, by alterations to the permeability of the membranes of cells lining the nephron walls. These changes in permeability are brought about by two main hormones: Aldosterone brings about retention (conservation) of salts within the body. ADH (anti-diuretic hormone) brings about water reabsorption (conservation) within the body. When a mammal begins to dehydrate, blood volume drops and this is detected in the hypothalamus of the brain. It stimulates the pituitary gland to release the hormone ADH, which acts on the nephrons of the kidneys to increase the reabsorption of water. The Antidiuretic Hormone works by making the kidneys more permeable to water. This means the kidneys allow more water to be reabsorbed in the body. When water levels are restored, there is less ADH produced, meaning less water is reabsorbed by the kidneys. Aldosterone (SALT regulation) is a steroid hormone secreted by the cortex of the adrenal gland. Its function is to regulate the transfer of sodium and potassium ions in the kidney. A decrease in the concentration of sodium ions in the bloodstream leads to a decrease in blood volume and this stimulates cells in the cortex of the adrenal gland (above the kidney) to secrete the hormone aldosterone. If sodium ions (salt) are in lower than normal concentration in the blood, less sodium is excreted in the urine as these ions are moved from the nephron into the surrounding capillaries by active transport. As water is attracted to sodium it also moves as a result. This increases the blood volume and so maintains blood pressure, as well as the sodium ion levels of the body fluids.
Views: 5669 iitutor.com
USMLE Renal 8: Fluid Compartments, Shifts and Graphs!
 
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Welcome to LY Med, where I go over everything you need to know for the USMLE STEP 1, with new videos every day. Follow along with First Aid, or with my notes which can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mt1jrikc24022py/AADNAVG8cAj4Su7xFO74fLBka?dl=0 Continuing renal physiology! This video will illustrate the importance of fluid compartments and balance in the body. Your body is made of about 60% water! 40% is found intracellular, while the rest is extracellular (and can be further divided into plasma and interstitial fluid). We know this is the case because we are able to measure fluid levels in the body. For example, we can measure total body water with heavy water (D20). Then we can measure ECF with mannitol or inulin. By subtracted the two we are left with intracellular fluid. Also important to know: know the ions that are found in each compartment! For example, inside the cell the major cation is potassium, while the major anion is phosphate. Extracellular anions include albumin and the major cation is sodium. That's all some background information. The real meat of this video deals with fluid shifts. You see, fluid changes happens in your ECF, and if there is osmotic changes here it can lead the ICF to move. We will discuss the chart they commonly like to test people with - fluid compartment chart. We will discuss different situations and explain the role it plays in shifting fluid in our body! These will include infusion of isotonic saline, hypertonic saline, hypotonic saline, diarrhea, water deprivation, adrenal insufficiency (Addison's), and SIADH. Done with this! Our next video will be on acid-base balance!
Views: 3032 LY Med
Introduction to buffers | Water, acids, and bases | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to pH and the pH scale. Examples of calculating pH of pure water, bleach, and orange juice. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/acids-bases-and-ph/v/buffer-system?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/acids-bases-and-ph/v/bronsted-lowry-definition-of-acids-and-bases?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 417013 Khan Academy
Body fluids 4, Haemorrhage and fluid compartments
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 Blood volume is restored after hemorrhage via the mechanism of transcapillary refill.
Views: 7358 Dr. John Campbell

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