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Search results “Psychology articles with abstracts”
How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)
 
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How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention! TIMESTAMPS Find out the requirements 0:55 Pick the right abstract type 1:42 Consider your readers 3:27 Explain the importance of your research 4:10 Explain the problem and your methods 4:45 Avoid copy-pasting 5:19 Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15 Include key phrases and words 7:00 Sum it up 7:49 Editing and proofreading 8:18 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style. -When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces. -Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts. -As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers. -It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract. -Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences. -No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion. -If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help. -An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument. -Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 108908 BRIGHT SIDE
How to Read and Comprehend Scientific Research Articles
 
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This tutorial will discuss how to read a scientific article, how to find the main points of the article, and how to take effective notes.
Views: 106782 umnLibraries
How Scientists Manipulate Research With P-Value
 
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Numbers don’t lie, right? Or are scientists intentionally using statistics to mislead us? Top 5 Things Wrong With Science ►►►►http://bit.ly/1pILTAB Sign Up For The TestTube Newsletter Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1myXbFG Read More: The ASA's statement on p-values: context, process,and purpose http://amstat.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00031305.2016.1154108#aHR0cDovL2Ftc3RhdC50YW5kZm9ubGluZS5jb20vZG9pL3BkZi8xMC4xMDgwLzAwMDMxMzA1LjIwMTYuMTE1NDEwOEBAQDA= “Underpinning many published scientific conclusions is the concept of ‘statistical significance,’ typically assessed with an index called the p-value. While the p-value can be a useful statistical measure, it is commonly misused and misinterpreted.” Evolution of Reporting P Values in the Biomedical Literature, 1990-2015 http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2503172 “In this analysis of P values reported in MEDLINE abstracts and in PMC articles from 1990-2015...almost all abstracts and articles with P values reported statistically significant results, and, in a subgroup analysis, few articles included confidence intervals, Bayes factors, or effect sizes. Rather than reporting isolated P values, articles should include effect sizes and uncertainty metrics.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Lissette Padilla on Twitter https://twitter.com/lizzette DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The TestTube Mailing List: http://dne.ws/1McUJdm
Views: 118902 Seeker
PsycARTICLES Articles
 
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This is a 2.5 min. video on how to access articles from PsycARTICLES and limit results by publication date.
Views: 2422 BCOnlineLibrary
How to write the Results part 1
 
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For science students who speak English as a second or foreign language. Explains the content of the results section, and also some information about figures and tables. Here is a link to the gorilla paper discussed in the video: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168159105004193 Here is a link to the tea paper discussed: http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/9630386
Views: 102031 Steve Kirk
APA Format: Abstract
 
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In this video, we discuss how to format abstracts according to the style guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA). Please download our "APA Format" handout here: http://www.umaryland.edu/media/umb/oaa/campus-life/writing-center/documents/APA-Format.pdf
Dr. Dani Babb - How to determine whether to use an abstract or full article for homework
 
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Dr. Dani Babb, CEO of The Babb Group, author and professor, provides this tutorial for students to understand how to determine whether the abstract is sufficient for their homework, or whether they need to use the full text article from the library.
Views: 281 TheBabbGroup
How to Read an Article
 
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Transcript: This short Library video will show you how to read an academic article for a research-based assignment When selecting articles consider the following: What information do I need for my assignment? Does this article relate to my research topic? Article formats can vary by discipline but here are some general tips to keep in mind. Before you read an article, ask yourself: What is this article's purpose? Who is its intended audience? Skimming refers to reading only the main ideas to get an overall impression of an article. We do this to save time and determine what to read more thoroughly later. Scanning is a reading technique used to find specific information quickly. While scanning we read only to find the answer to a question, ignoring unrelated information. With journal articles use structure to quickly locate relevant information: 1. Read the Title, though note that titles can be misleading 2. Read the abstract [define] 3. figures & illustrations, discussion section conclusion which tell us many things before we read an article in its entirety Some articles are exceedingly dense and are written for a highly specialized audience -- be prepared to rule out difficult articles or to invest a lot of time in understanding the concepts in the articles. Print off the article and jot down brief notes in order to record what you're noticing and thinking about the article as you read. This will help save time later when you can use your notes to quickly find important points in the article without rereading it. Consider noting the following: - The author's underlying assumptions, beliefs and values - Arguments and conclusions - The evidence that's presented to support the arguments You may need a dictionary, encyclopaedia, or other reference sources to assist with important terms and comprehension A useful journal article can lead to other relevant sources. If your article has one, observe the literature review or recommendations for further reading. You should also consult the list of references or end notes at the end of the article to locate related material. Need help? Ask Us. Chat, E-mail, phone, or drop by. This concludes the library video on how to read an academic article.
Views: 25177 U of G Library
Strategies for Reading a Scholarly Article
 
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This video demonstrates some reading strategies for reading and understanding a scholarly article.
Views: 2926 USU Libraries
How to write an Abstract: Some useful tips
 
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First impressions are always important, and in the case of your research paper, it is the abstract that the reader gets to see first. Hence it is important to know how to write the perfect abstract. This video explains the purpose of an abstract, and provides some useful tips to help you write the most effective abstract for your paper.
Views: 143024 Editage Insights
HNFE 2014 Practice Example - Finding A Peer Reviewed Research Article
 
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A final practice walk through of conducting a keyword search in PubMed; using limits to sort by publication date, human subjects; using options to sort by relevance and see abstracts; getting to full text with Get VText; checking the article is a research article (randomized controlled trial); checking the journal is peer reviewed; identifying a recent citation in the reference list; locating that cited article with a summon search; and finishing up on the library course guide page on APA citation resources.
Views: 202 Ginny Pannabecker
Case Report Abstract Writing
 
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Dr. Steffany Moonaz, the Director of Clinical and Academic Research at the Maryland University of Integrative Health gives an in-depth presentation about case report abstract writing. If you have any questions regarding the submission process, you can contact Dr. Steffany Moonaz at [email protected] For more information about research at MUIH, feel free to go to http://muih.edu/academics/research or send an email to [email protected]
Chapter 2: American Psychological Association (APA) Style
 
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The APA referencing style is used by The University of Liverpool's online psychology and doctorate in education programmes. This video will cover: - How to cite and reference multiple sources. - How to create references for multimedia sources - Websites, ejournals, etc. - How students can cite themselves
Views: 3897 UoLstudentcenter
Writing an Abstract for Scholarly Publication
 
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This is a quick tutorial covers tips and best practices for writing an abstract for scholarly publication.
Views: 152 PurdueLibraries
Summarizing a Research Study
 
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Table of Contents: 00:17 - Scientific Literacy in Psychology 00:30 - Scientific Literacy in Psychology 00:55 - Summarizing Research Articles 02:15 - Scientific Writing 03:02 - Scientific Writing 03:36 - Scientific Writing 03:52 - Scientific Writing 04:00 - Scientific Writing 04:25 - Scientific Writing 04:45 - Scientific Writing 04:56 - Scientific Writing 05:30 - Scientific Writing 05:43 - Scientific Writing 06:22 - Assignment 07:02 - Assignment Grading
Views: 628 Robin Musselman
Child Temperament:  How We Start to Become Ourselves | David C Rettew | TEDxBurlingtonED
 
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This talk will start with a very brief description of what child temperament is and how it develops over time. Particular attention will be given to how a child’s temperament can pull from the environment certain qualities that often serve to accentuate traits and propel them to become more extreme. The role of a parent will then be discussed, including issues of labelling children and the important task of being able to “override” natural but sometimes suboptimal parental responses. Finally, there will be a short investigation into what we know about the boundaries between what are called temperament or personality traits and what are called psychiatric symptoms or disorders. David Rettew is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He is the Training Director of the UVM Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship and the Director of the Pediatric Psychiatry Clinic at the UVM Medical Center. He completed his adult and child psychiatry training at Harvard Medical School within the Massachusetts General and McLean Hospital program. Dr. Rettew joined the UVM faculty in 2002 where he divides his time between clinical, teaching and research activities. His main research interest is the role of temperament and personality factors in childhood psychiatric disorders. Dr. Rettew has over 100 published journal articles, chapters, and scientific abstracts on a variety of child mental health topics, including a recent book entitled Child Temperament: New Thinking About the Boundary Between Traits and Illness. He also writes a blog for Psychology Today called the “ABCs of Child Psychiatry.” This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 63921 TEDx Talks
How to use PsycINFO
 
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Demonstration of how to use PsycINFO and some tips on how to effectively search for psychology articles.
Views: 1521 Ross Avilla
What Is A Psychological Assessment?
 
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Are you thinking about seeking the help of a assessment psychology online is psychologist's desktop reference for psychological assessment, testing, and practice resources, with information resources on testing psychologists, mental health professionals, educators, students patients evaluates thinking, learning behaviour. Psychology and psychologist, counseling assessment, tampa florida. Psych central what is psychological assessment? . Psych central psychcentral lib what is psychological assessment url? Q webcache. The assessment may include interviews, observation, testing and consultation with psychological is the extensive purview of psychologistspsychologist reserved for individuals who have met requirements feb 4, 2016 a can be useful when children or young people are having difficulties at school acting developing in ways they assess evaluate information that you give to examiner, which why formal name earn ceus on par assessments demand! 8 2017 7 29 am. What is psychological assessment? Iowa associationpsychological testing par assessment resources, incwhat & evaluation. Index of articles, books, abstracts & resources. In clinical psychological assessment is designed to train students the evidence based practice of and treatment services, llc counseling evaluations, assessments tampa, fl. Recent research on assessing risk of violence studies i've gathered 10 the most common fallacies and pitfalls that plague psychological testing assessment, provided a brief definition discussion therefore, these patients typically are required to complete thorough evaluation, including determine their appropriateness for master education (m. 10 fallacies in psychological assessment ken pope. Psychological assessment? What is psychological Understanding testing and assessment. Integrative a psychological assessment is the attempt of skilled professional, usually psychologist, to use techniques and tools psychology learn either general this mental health quiz screens for 8 common issues15 20 minutes. Ed in clinical psychological assessment. Psychologists use both types of tools to help them arrive at a diagnosis and treatment plan. You can now earn ceu credits on select par assessments through our partnership with the goals of an assessment are (1) to gain a richer, deeper, and or different understanding person's thoughts, emotions, processing, behavior, learning; Psychological involves administration, scoring, interpretation tests; It also requires psychologist prepare written report meet psychological clinical & forensic. Psychological assessment american psychological association. What is psychological assessment psychpagepsychology today. Psychological assessment of the patient undergoing bariatric surgery. Assessment psychology online psychological assessment and testing resources what is a assessment? Sickkids. Googleusercontent search. Testing involves the use of formal tests such as questionnaires or checklists psychological assessment is concer
Views: 115 Bun Bun 1
Sociological Abstracts
 
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A short introduction to using Sociological Abstracts to find journal articles
Views: 655 UTMLibrary
Social Work Abstracts Tutorial
 
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Stockton College | Richard E. Bjork Library Social Work Abstracts offers extensive coverage of more than 850 social work and human services journals dating back to 1965. Produced by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the database provides indexing and abstracts dealing with all aspects of the social work field, including theory and practice, areas of service and social issues and problems.
Views: 1004 RSCLibraryNJ
Psych Intro SP: Feedback from Matthew and Phuong - Dec 2018
 
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Associate Professor Matthew E. Mundy, Director of Education for the School of Psychological Sciences and course mentor Phuong Hua respond informally to learner activity in the online “Introduction to Psychology: Sensation and Perception” course by Monash University on FutureLearn. This is a two week online course offered as part of a program of “Introduction to Psychology” courses: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/introduction-to-psychology #FLPsychIntro. Topics this week include: 00:04 Hi and welcome from Matthew & Phuong. 00:24 Sights and sounds being associated with emotions and memories. * 01:10 Combination of memory and perception. Amygdala. 02:22 Amygdala links to fear and anxiety disorders. * 02:32 Top down and bottom up processing. Genetic involvement in perception. 03:08 Colour blind example 03:35 Prosopagnosia example * 04:35 Week two: auditory system, pain perception, visual illusions, multimodal principles, synesthesia and more. 05:42 Wrap up and goodbye. *Links or References: (NB you may only be able to access some of these links if you are enrolled in the course): (From time to time we provide links to free abstracts and/or research papers, which we offer as optional additional reading for those who may be interested. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) “The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health” (Abstract) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5039451/ (We often provide links to free abstracts from research papers, as optional additional reading. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) “The Role of the Amygdala in Anxiety Disorders” https://www.intechopen.com/books/the-amygdala-a-discrete-multitasking-manager/the-role-of-the-amygdala-in-anxiety-disorders “The amygdala modulates the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing experiences” (Abstract) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15217324 “Neural and genetic foundations of face recognition and prosopagnosia.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19334306 “First report of prevalence of non-syndromic hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA).” (Abstract) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16817175 Preview step 2.7 about visual perception in ‘Psychology and perceptual illusions” https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sensation-perception/3/steps/423445 Upgrade your access: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sensation-perception/3/upgrade Optional upgrade your access if you’d like unlimited access to the course content; and/or if you’d like to receive a Certificate of Achievement; and/or if you’re interested in pursuing the course path through to the “Final Assessment” or online “Graduate Diploma”. About Monash University’s fully online “Graduate Diploma in Psychology” https://online.monash.edu/course/graduate-diploma-psychology Here’s the trailer to explain more about the “Final Assessment”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnvBGokQN2w The next “Final Assessment” 6wk online unit is scheduled to run in April 2019 You may like to subscribe to our YouTube channel so you’re the first to find out when new feedback videos are uploaded: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxj4qAV2yWzYlVH9A6CDl5Q If you have other questions for us about how the courses work, we’re also on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FLPsychIntro Other Monash courses available on FutureLearn: http://www.monash.edu/learning-teaching/massive-open-online-courses Optional follow: @FLPsychIntro on Twitter. Tag #FLPsychIntro in social media.
t is imperative that psychology students learn how to navigate throug
 
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t is imperative that psychology students learn how to navigate through the GCU eLibrary to locate and evaluate relevant primary sources for research. This assignment will assist you in learning how to conduct proper research. Access the GCU eLibrary ProQuest Psych database. Refer to the Library Resource to assist you. Choose a topic to research relevant to this course. Locate 5 relevant articles that are actual research studies on a topic of choice. For only one of the articles, in a Word document, include the following: 1. A summary (250-300 words) of the study. 2. A brief analysis/evaluation (literary contribution and methodology) of the study (250-300 words). Copy and paste the article citations and abstracts into a Word document to submit to the instructor: Rough Draft- Submit the assignment to the instructor by the end of Day Three of Module 1 through email. The instructor will provide feedback on the research articles to ensure they are actual research studies by the end of Module 1. You will use this feedback to revise your search, if necessary. APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.
Views: 0 bnhgxjjx jnghjxj
Your Most Vivid Memories Aren't As Accurate As You Think
 
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We all have memories that seem like they happened yesterday, but can you really trust them? Hosted by: Brit Garner ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Will and Sonja Marple, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/001002777790018X http://nwkpsych.rutgers.edu/neuroscience/publications/sharot-2004.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4024154/ http://pure.au.dk//portal/files/46131849/Bohn_Berntsen.PleasantnessBias.pdf https://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/09/memories.aspx http://911memory.nyu.edu/abstracts/talarico_rubin.pdf http://911memory.nyu.edu/abstracts/talarico_rubin.pdf http://psych.wustl.edu/memory/Roddy%20article%20PDF's/Roediger%20&%20McDermott%20(1995)_JEPLMC.pdf http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/schacterlab/files/hirst_etal_jepgeneral_2015.pdf https://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/09/memories.aspx https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ulterior-motives/201506/the-consistency-flashbulb-memories Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Magicube.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_F._Kennedy,_White_House_color_photo_portrait.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Martin_Luther_King_Jr_with_medallion_NYWTS.jpg https://images.nimh.nih.gov/public_il/image_details.cfm?id=87 https://images.nimh.nih.gov/public_il/image_details.cfm?id=653 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Berlin_wall_1988.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Maps_of_West_Germany#/media/File:West_Germany_1956-1990.svg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crane_removed_part_of_Wall_Brandenburg_Gate.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Truncated_Alternated_Cubic_Honeycomb.svg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MRI_brain.jpg
Views: 87665 SciShow Psych
Paper \xc2\xa0(52 points)\r\nDue April 6, 2016\r\nPaper Topic:\r\nCri
 
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Paper  (52 points) Due April 6, 2016 Paper Topic: Critically review a psychology research article which you select. You may use articles from Psychological Abstracts (use library databases: PsychINFO or PubMed) or  select an article from a set of articles placed on reserve at the library for this course. • Describe the problem or question the paper seeks to answer (What was the hypothesis?). • Describe the methods used to collect the data and perform the study (using terminology appropriate for describing experimental research methods (see Chapter 2 of the textbook). • Describe the findings of the researchers. Were these findings reasonable based upon their methods, sampling, and analysis of the results? • How might the researchers improve their study? • What other explanations exist for their results? • What is the relevance of this research? (How does it relate to everyday life, social interaction, child development, or major issues in psychology, etc.?) Feel free to do further research (e.g. look at papers which support the authors conclusions or which contradict them).     Guidelines for Psychology 200 Paper for Sections J and KM Spring 2016 The purpose of this paper assignment is to improve the students skill in written communication in the discipline of psychology. The paper will be worth 52 points. The written papers will be judged on both content and grammar in awarding points. Late papers will not be accepted. All papers are due on April 6, 2016. Papers should be typed, double-spaced, using 1 inch margins with a font size of 12 points. Your paper should be a minimum of 750 words (3-4 pages in length). Each paper must include a title page, the body of the paper (3-4 pages), and a bibliography (including works cited) page. Title Page     Your Paper Title     Your Name     Course :
Views: 0 bnhgxjjx jnghjxj
Biological Psychology (journal) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_Psychology_(journal) 00:00:41 Abstracting and indexing Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7265992267113488 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biological Psychology is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering biological psychology published by Elsevier. The editor-in-chief is Ottmar V. Lipp (University of Queensland). Biological Psychology publishes research on the biological aspects of psychological states and processes, including electrophysiology, biochemical assessments during psychological experiments, and biologically induced changes in psychological function.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Finding Empirical Studies in psycINFO & psycARTICLES
 
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This short tutorial focuses on how to search for empirical research in two EBSCOhost databases, pyschINFO & psycARTICLES. TRANSCRIPT: In this short tutorial, we’ll go over how to find empirical studies within PsycArticles and PsychInfo, two EBSCOhost databases. To access the Sullivan Library databases from Dominican College’s homepage, hover over Academics in and then click on The Sullivan Library. Next, choose Databases within the Find menu. Databases are online platforms that provide access to abstracts and full-text articles from scholarly journals, trade journals, magazines, and other publications, usually all of the same or similar discipline. To organize databases by discipline, click on All Subjects and scroll down to find Psychology & Sociology. From here, choose PsycArticles. To search both PsycArticles and PsycInfo at once, click on Choose Databases. EBSCO is a company that hosts a variety of different databases, and you’ll see that you have the option of searching many or all of them at the same time. For now, check off PsycInfo and click OK. To find empirical research studies, you must use the advanced search, NOT the basic search. Scroll down to find search filters. In the methodology section, choose Empirical Study. Empirical studies use observational techniques and quantitative measurements to conduct experiments and collect data. Also tick off Peer-Reviewed. Articles that have been published in peer-reviewed journals are typically high quality; this is because experts, such as scholars and practitioners in the field of psychology, have vetted and edited each article before publication and deemed it appropriate for that particular journal. You might also want to check off Linked Full Text. This will filter out search results where only the abstract is available to read, and not the article in its entirety. Leaving this un-checked is useful when you have time to request full-text articles through interlibrary loan Now let’s try a sample search. Let’s say you’re researching the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on veterans with PTSD. On the advanced search page, it’s best to break up your key terms by using different fields separated by the search operator AND. In the first field, you would type “cognitive behavioral therapy” in quotation marks, to keep the phrase together. In the next field, veterans. And in the last, “posttraumatic stress disorder.” If you were searching on the basic search page, your search string would look like this. We have 24 results. Remember, these are records of peer-reviewed, full-text, empirical research articles—the filters you initially chose to search through. You’ll see on the left that there are more filters you can employ should you feel the need to. For example, if you only wanted to see articles published within the last five years, you could change the publication date. That cuts your search results in half. These records contain a lot of information, like article title, authors, journal title, volume, and issue, page numbers, and more. You can also read the article’s abstract, or comprehensive summary, by clicking this icon. The abstract can help you decide whether or not to read the full-text of the article. Click on an article title to find even more information and tools, and sometimes even the HTML full-text below. A link to the PDF full-text should be located in the upper left corner of the page. Opening the PDF allows you to download a copy from your browser to your computer, or to print the full-text. Alternatively, you could email the article to yourself to read later by using this email tool. Be sure to send the PDF attachment and to choose the APA citation. Always double check that database-generated citations are correctly formatted; they very often are not. If you've created an account with EBSCO, you can save the article to a folder to read at another time, as well. This is a good option if you'll be reading many different articles and would like to organize them into sub-folders. To create an account, click Sign In and then Create a New Account. If you have further questions or need any help at all, never hesitate to contact the Sullivan Library via email, phone, or chat. Or, stop by to see us in real life! Thanks for watching.
How To Prepare an Oral Research Presentation
 
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Learn how to prepare an oral presentation of your research! For more tips and advice visit urca.msu.edu
Your Asthma and Allergies Aren't Causing Mental Illness
 
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You may have read headlines suggesting that if you have allergies, you might be at greater risk of developing mental illness. But don't panic just yet. Hank unpacks these findings on this week's SciShow News Hosted by: Hank Green Head to https://scishowfinds.com/ for hand selected artifacts of the universe! ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Jerry Perez, Lazarus G, Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00133/full https://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2018-04/f-aah041718.php http://www.aaaai.org/about-aaaai/newsroom/asthma-statistics https://nationaleczema.org/research/eczema-facts/ http://www.aaaai.org/about-aaaai/newsroom/allergy-statistics https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19171465 http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1981/pdf/1981-v10n04-p249.pdf https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919220107.htm https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3885302/ http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/s41557-018-0046-3 https://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2018-04/giom-fan041918.php http://cyberbridge.mcb.harvard.edu/mitosis_4.html http://www.ub.edu/gesq/dna/abstracts/review_Benabou.pdf
Views: 78446 SciShow
Psychology in the Social Imaginary of Neoliberalism
 
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Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete Greece,00302841026182,00306932607174,[email protected], https://plus.google.com/communities/1... , ,https://plus.google.com/u/0/+Alexandr... , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQH2... , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTRE... , https://twitter.com/g_orl?lang=el, https://www.instagram.com/alexandross...,https://gr.pinterest.com/alexsfakianakis/medicine-by-alexandros-g-sfakianakis/, Special Issue: Psychology in the Social Imaginary of Neoliberalism by Jacy Young via Advances in the History of Psychology 76362_photo.jpg AHP readers may be interested in the most recent issue of Theory & Psychology, a special issue devoted to “Psychology in the Social Imaginary of Neoliberalism.” Guest edited by Wade Pickren (right), the articles in the issue are currently available open access. Full titles, authors, and abstracts below. “Psychology in the social imaginary of neoliberalism: Critique and beyond,” by. Wade E. Pickren. Abstract: This is an introduction to the special issue on the impact of neoliberalism on the sociality, politics, and governmentality of contemporary psychological life. The articles suggest that Euro-American psychology writ large has not been a force for human freedom. Still, the articles are additional evidence of the historical and current lines of resistance and activism that indicate a move toward an emancipatory psychology. “Homo neoliberalus: From personality to forms of subjectivity,” by Thomas Teo. Abstract: Based on a Neo-Sprangerian approach to forms of life in Western cultures, and drawing on humanities-based ideas about personality, a critical-hermeneutic description of a neoliberal form of life and its corresponding form of subjectivity is presented. In the neoliberal form of subjectivity, the self becomes central, but in a way that the distinction between an ego and the self is no longer relevant. Neoliberal thinking is reduced to utilitarian, calculating thinking in all domains of life from work, to interaction, and to identity. Feeling is considered to be more relevant than thinking and is used to manage stress while aiming for happiness, which is core to this subjectivity. It is argued that agency is reduced to self- and family-interests while consequences for the conduct of life are presented. Concepts such as new nihilism, reduction of individuality, and (im)possibility of resistance in neoliberalism are discussed. “Neoliberalism and IQ: Naturalizing economic and racial inequality,” by Andrew S. Winston. Abstract: How did IQ become an important means of naturalizing economic and racial inequality and supporting neoliberal visions of a fully privatized, free market society? I show how post-WWII neoliberals and libertarians could employ ideas of “innate intelligence” to promote the reduction of government funding of social programs. For extreme libertarian economist Murray Rothbard, inequality among individuals and ethnicities was self-evident from human history and the a priori examination of the “natural order,” but IQ data could also be employed in the fight against “egalitarianism.” Any attempt to interfere in this “natural order,” such as civil rights legislation, was viewed as inherently evil. For libertarian Charles Murray and more mainstream neoliberals such as Milton Friedman, empirical research on intelligence was an effective means of influencing public perception and policy on welfare, affirmative action, and immigration. I discuss recent work on “national intelligence” in relation to neoliberal projects and enduring fears regarding reproduction and family. “Feminism, psychology, and the gendering of neoliberal subjectivity: From critique to disruption,” by Alexandra Rutherford. Abstract: Numerous feminist scholars have argued that women, especially young women, have been constructed as ideal neoliberal subjects. Informed by Foucauldian approaches that extend neoliberalism beyond a set of free market principles to a dynamic that creates new forms of subjectivity, these scholars have demonstrated the elisions between “postfeminism” and neoliberalism in the positioning of young women as consumers, self-helpers, and “empowered” agents par excellence. The psy-disciplines have actively participated in the gendering of neoliberal subjectivity and I selectively review feminist critiques of this complicity. These critiques problematize discourses of empowerment, agency, and choice, even as they have seeped into feminist psychology itself. I then consider the theoretical resources that are available within and beyond feminist psychology to disrupt and even displace neoliberal forms of subjectivity. Building on insights from psychosocial studies, intersectional and decolonial approaches, and critical history and conjunctural thinking, I brainstorm some alternative
Biblical Series I: Introduction to the Idea of God
 
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Lecture I in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories series from May 16th at Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto. In this lecture, I describe what I consider to be the idea of God, which is at least partly the notion of sovereignty and power, divorced from any concrete sovereign or particular, individual person of power. I also suggest that God, as Father, is something akin to the spirit or pattern inherent in the human hierarchy of authority, which is based in turn on the dominance hierarchies characterizing animals. Q & A Starts: 1:57:25 Producer Credit and thanks to the following $200/month Patreon supporters. Without such support, this series would not have happened: Adam Clarke, Alexander Meckhai’el Beraeros, Andy Baker, Arden C. Armstrong, Badr Amari, BC, Ben Baker, Benjamin Cracknell, Brandon Yates, Chad Grills, Chris Martakis, Christopher Ballew, Craig Morrison, Daljeet Singh, Damian Fink, Dan Gaylinn, Daren Connel, David Johnson, David Tien, Donald Mitchell, Eleftheria Libertatem, Enrico Lejaru, George Diaz, GeorgeB, Holly Lindquist, Ian Trick, James Bradley, James N. Daniel, III, Jan Schanek, Jason R. Ferenc, Jesse Michalak, Joe Cairns, Joel Kurth, John Woolley, Johnny Vinje, Julie Byrne, Keith Jones, Kevin Fallon, Kevin Patrick McSurdy, Kevin Van Eekeren, Kristina Ripka, Louise Parberry, Matt Karamazov, Matt Sattler, Mayor Berkowitz , Michael Thiele, Nathan Claus, Nick Swenson , Patricia Newman, Pisit Mongkolsiriwattana, Robb Kelley, Robin Otto, Ryan Kane, Sabish Balan, Salman Alsabah, Scott Carter, Sean C., Sean Magin, Sebastian Thaci, Shiqi Hu, Soheil Daftarian, Srdan Pavlovic, Starting Ideas, Too Analytical, Trey McLemore, William Wilkinson, Yazz Troche, Zachary Vader --- SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL --- Direct Support: https://www.jordanbpeterson.com/donate Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson --- BOOKS --- 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos: https://jordanbpeterson.com/12-rules-for-life/ Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief: https://jordanbpeterson.com/maps-of-meaning/ --- LINKS --- Website: https://jordanbpeterson.com/ 12 Rules for Life Tour: https://jordanbpeterson.com/events/ Blog: https://jordanbpeterson.com/blog/ Podcast: https://jordanbpeterson.com/podcast/ Reading List: https://jordanbpeterson.com/great-books/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpeterson Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jordan.b.peterson/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drjordanpeterson --- PRODUCTS --- Self Authoring Suite: https://selfauthoring.com/ Understand Myself personality test: https://understandmyself.com/ Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson
Views: 3986505 Jordan B Peterson
Psych Intro SP: Feedback from Matthew and Phuong - Sept 2018
 
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Associate Professor Matthew E. Mundy, Director of Education for the School of Psychological Sciences and course mentor Phuong Hua respond informally to learner activity in the online “Introduction to Psychology: Sensation and Perception” course by Monash University on FutureLearn. This is a two week online course offered as part of a program of “Introduction to Psychology” courses: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/introduction-to-psychology #FLPsychIntro. Topics this week include: 00:04 Hi and welcome. Introductions from Matthew & Phuong. 00:23 Almost 1,000 learners. Great questions etc. 00:48 What is sensation & perception reflection. Senses discussed. 01:34 Smell and memory. Evoking emotional memory. Amygdala. Flash bulb memories. * 03:01 Children learn better when using multimodal stimuli. * 04:09 Using senses as cues. Perfume example. * 04:29 Perception process discussion: stimulus, recognition, perception, action. 04:50 Bottom up and top down processing. Predominance / prevalence reflection. 05:38 Bottom up example: Facial recognition. The own-race effect. * 07:02 Qualitative v quantitative methods used in psychophysics discussion. 08:56 Next week: More about the senses. Visual perceptions. Gestalt principles. 09:37 Visual perception. Perceptual illusions discussion, leading into next week. * 10:24 Phuong and Natalie will continue to moderate and mentor to the end of the course. 10:31 Thanks and goodbye. *Links or References: (NB you may only be able to access some of these links if you are enrolled in the course): (From time to time we provide links to free abstracts and/or research papers, which we offer as optional additional reading for those who may be interested. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) “Learning through Multi-touch Interfaces in Museum Exhibits: An Empirical Investigation” https://www.researchgate.net/publication/256364429_Learning_through_Multi-touch_Interfaces_in_Museum_Exhibits_An_Empirical_Investigation “The Effects of Olfactory Environmental Cues on Prospective Memory” http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1541931213601409?journalCode=proe “The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5039451/ “A holistic account of the own-race effect in face recognition” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15110726 Be sure to comment in step 2.7 about visual perception in ‘Psychology and perceptual illusions” https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sensation-perception/2/steps/396203 “Introduction to Psychology: Sensation and Perception” by Monash University is a two week online course offered as part of a program of “Introduction to Psychology” courses on the @FutureLearn platform. The next run of ‘Sensation and Perception” will start 3 December 2018. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sensation-perception?utm_campaign=monash_university_sensation_perception_september_2018&utm_medium=organic_social&utm_source=youtube “Introduction to Psychology” course page – to access all the courses in this suite: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/introduction-to-psychology About Monash University’s fully online “Graduate Diploma in Psychology” https://online.monash.edu/course/graduate-diploma-psychology Here’s the trailer to explain more about the “Final Assessment”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnvBGokQN2w NB: The next “Final Assessment” is scheduled for March/April 2019 to line up with Other Monash courses available on FutureLearn: http://www.monash.edu/learning-teaching/massive-open-online-courses Optional follow: @FLPsychIntro on Twitter. Tag #FLPsychIntro in social media.
Psychology and Alchemy | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychology_and_Alchemy 00:01:19 1 Overview 00:04:04 2 Content 00:06:48 3 Part I. Introduction to the Religious and Psychological Problems of Alchemy 00:08:37 4 Part II. Individual Dream Symbolism in Alchemy 00:09:42 5 Part III. Religious Ideas in Alchemy 00:11:06 6 Quotations 00:18:43 7 Editions Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7249575377514316 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Psychology and Alchemy is Volume 12 in The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, a series of books published by Princeton University Press in the U.S. and Routledge & Kegan Paul in the U.K. It is study of the analogies between alchemy, Christian dogma, and psychological symbolism.Alchemy is central to Jung's hypothesis of the collective unconscious. This book begins with an outline of the process and aims of psychotherapy as seen by Jung. It then moves on to work out the analogies mentioned above and his own understanding of the analytic process. Jung reminds us of the dual nature of alchemy, comprising both the chemical process and a parallel mystical component. He also discusses the seemingly deliberate mystification of the alchemists. Finally, in using the alchemical process to provide insights into individuation, Jung emphasises the importance of alchemy in relating to us the transcendent nature of the psyche.Detailed abstracts of each chapter are available online.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
The Importance of Research Methods in Introductory Psychology
 
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In this keynote address from the 2012 APA/Clark University Workshop for High School Teachers, Randy Smith, PhD, of Lamar University, stresses the importance of teaching research methods in the psychology classroom, emphasizing its role as the base for psychology as a discipline. He highlights the close link between critical thinking and research methods, suggesting that an emphasis on thinking critically will help psychology students better understand research methods. This video was supported by a grant from the American Psychological Foundation, thanks to generous support from Lee Gurel, PhD.
Stanford Seminar - Unethical Algorithms of Massive Scale
 
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EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Seminar Unethical Algorithms of Massive Scale: New Data, a New Discovery, a New Tracking System, and a New Organization Speaker: Robert Epstein, The Sunlight Society and The American Institute for Behaviorial Research and Technology The Internet has made possible new means of manipulating opinions, purchases and votes that are unprecedented in human history in their effectiveness, scale and clandestine nature. Whether closely guided by human hands or operating independently of their creators, these algorithms now guide human decision making 24/7, often in ways that have ethical consequences. Biased search rankings, for example, have been shown to shift the voting preferences of undecided voters dramatically without any awareness on their part that they are being manipulated (the Search Engine Manipulation Effect, or SEME). Recent research shows that SEME can impact a wide range of opinions, not just voting preferences, and that multiple searches increase SEME's impact. New experiments also help to explain why SEME is so powerful and demonstrate how SEME can be suppressed to some extent. In 2016, new research also demonstrated that search suggestions (in "autocomplete") can also be used shift opinions and votes (the Search Suggestion Effect, or SSE). Demonstrating these possibilities in research is one thing; do search engine companies actually show people search suggestions or search results that are biased in some way? In 2016, AIBRT researchers recruited a nationwide network of field agents whose election-related searches were collected and aggregated for six months before the November election, thus preserving 13,207 searchers and the 98,044 web pages to which the search results linked. This unique data set revealed that that search results were indeed biased toward one candidate during most of this period in all 10 search positions on the first page of search results - enough, perhaps, to shift millions of votes without people's knowledge. Based on the success of this tracking effort, in early 2017, experts in multiple fields and at multiple universities in the US and Europe came together to creates The Sunlight Society (http://TheSunlightSociety.org), a nonprofit organization devoted to creating a worldwide ecosystem of passive monitoring software that will reveal a wide range of online manipulations as they are occurring, thus providing a means for identifying unethical algorithms as they are launched. About the Speaker: Robert Epstein is Senior Research Psychologist at the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology (AIBRT) in Vista, California, as well as the former editor-in-chief of Psychology Today magazine and the founder and director emeritus of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. A Ph.D. of Harvard University, he has published 15 books on artificial intelligence, creativity, stress management, and other topics, as well as more than 250 scientific and popular articles in publications such as Science, Nature, Psychological Science, TIME, Discover, U.S. News & World Report, and Scientific American Mind, where Dr. Epstein is a contributing editor. Dr. Epstein is also the founding director of the Loebner Prize Competition in Artificial Intelligence, an annual Turing Test that has been conducted since 1990. A thought leader in the behavioral sciences, Dr. Epstein is interviewed by journalists between 50 and 100 times a year. You can follow him on Twitter at @DrREpstein. For more information, see http://drrobertepstein.com . For more information about this seminar and its speaker, you can visit http://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/170607.html Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series provided by the Stanford Computer Forum. Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 2879 stanfordonline
A day in the life...Dr Emma Meaburn
 
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As part of Science Week 2017, Dr Emma Meaburn from the Department of Psychological Sciences at Birkbeck gives an insight into a day in the life of a scientist. I get up at … 6am (or 6.30 am, if I am lucky), when I am woken by my children. The next two hours are a whirl of breakfast, loudness, finding lost shoes, cajoling, cuddles and probably some light bribery before I leave the house at 8.15am. I drop the youngest child off at nursery on my way to the train station, and typically arrive at Birkbeck by about 9.30am. My research … looks at the genetic contributions to individual differences in psychological traits and disorders. We all differ, and I am interested in how these differences are influenced by differences in our DNA and how the information stored in our DNA is used. I teach on … the BSc Psychology degree program, where I co-convene and co-teach a large first year ‘Research Methods’ module that provides psychology students with a basic grounding in the principles of experimental design and statistics. Undergraduate students can sometimes be surprised that research methods form a core element of the program, and we work hard to make it accessible and relevant to the students’ current knowledge and career aspirations. I also teach on the final year “Genetics and Psychology” optional module. This is always enjoyable as I get to talk about my own research findings and that of my colleagues, and expose the students to the newest methods and insights from the field of behavior genetics. I am also responsible for … quite a few things! Broadly, my job falls into three categories; research, teaching and service. As part of my research activities I am responsible for running a lab and the admin that comes with it; writing ethics applications; PhD student supervision, training and mentorship; securing funding (writing and revising grant applications); dissemination of my research via conference attendance, giving invited talks, publishing my work in peer reviewed articles and public engagement activities. Behavior genetics is a fast-paced field, and I stay informed about new developments and methods as best I can by reading the literature, speaking to colleagues and collaborators, organizing and attending conferences and (occasionally) training workshops. I also peer review grants and manuscripts; supervise undergraduate (about four per year) and graduate student research projects (about two per year); sit on the academic advisory board and postgraduate research committee, and I am a member of the management committee of the University of London Centre for Educational Neuroscience, which provides a unified research environment for translational neuroscience. My typical day … doesn’t really exist! One of the best aspects of academic life is that each day is different. If I am teaching in the evening, typically I will meet with my PhD students (or project students) in the morning where we discuss the past week’s progress, go over new results and edits of conference abstracts and manuscript drafts. Then there is at least an hour of email and admin tasks such as paying invoices, tracking lost lab orders, or hurriedly writing a PhD application, before heading to the gym for an hour of ‘me’ time. I’ll then undo all my hard work by grabbing a hearty lunch from one of the many fantastic food places around Birkbeck, before attending a departmental seminar or journal club. That leaves me with a couple more hours to squeeze in research and research admin before preparing for the evening’s class. Once the class is over (at about 8.30pm), I head back to my office for 30 minutes of emails before catching the tube home. All being well, I’ll get home around 9.30/10pm, check on my (mostly) sleeping family, and do 30 minutes of life chores before collapsing into bed. I became a scientist… because I had always loved science and by my late teens I had developed a keen interest in what was then known as the “Nature Versus Nurture’ debate. I think this interest was sparked by my own experiences and reflections as a fostered child (I was separated from my biological parents at six months of age), and when I finally studied genetics as an undergraduate student in human biology at King’s College London, my mind was made up – I was going to be a geneticist! My greatest professional achievement… has been establishing myself as a research active academic and developing my own research program, in a field where academic positions at renowned institutions like Birkbeck are few and far between and competition is fierce. I get to work in a research field that is dynamic, challenging and interesting, and in a supportive, autonomous and friendly environment. For more information - http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/bbkcomments/2017/04/04/a-day-in-the-life-of-dr-emma-meaburn Department of Psychological Sciences - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/psychology #BBKScienceWeek - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/scienceweek .
PsycARTICLES: Abstracts & Methodologies
 
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This is a 3 min. video on how to find and use article abstracts and methodology searches in PsycARTICLES.
Views: 645 BCOnlineLibrary
Stanford Seminar - How to Design Addictive Games
 
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EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Seminar How to Design Addictive Games Speaker: Chuck Clanton, Aratar A great game seduces its player into flow state. Since we know a lot about what flow state is and what it requires, you might imagine that game's design to be a lot of work, but not mysterious. Yet 99% of all games fail. The vast majority of game designers have never designed an addictive game. In HCI research, games are analyzed based on flow state properties but that's descriptive, not prescriptive. Designing such games remains mystical. Like other performing arts, game design needs accident, luck, inspiration, perspiration, and knowledge. I would like to justify my being invited to talk so on top of the skeleton of flow, I will add some meat that you would not likely hear from anyone else. I will talk about what I learned playtesting my own work and what I was taught by great game designers, in creating games that were indeed addictive. As such, this will be a very idiosyncratic and personal introduction to the art of designing irresistible engagement. About the Speaker: Chuck Clanton is a software user experience designer, who likes working on new problems. He invented touch screen interactions on the star7 at FirstPerson in 1991-2, avatar-centric communication in virtual worlds in 2000-2004 (which won a technical Emmy award), and very effective "adver-gaming" on floor and wall displays using 3d gestures in space in 2004-8 (prior to Microsoft's Kinect). Around 1995, he decided that he needed to know the secrets of game designers. He went to Electronic Arts UK Studio outside London where he user tested every game from the studio. He eventually worked on the design of four platinum games: Populous the Beginning, Sim Theme Park, Dungeonkeeper II, and the first Harry Potter for advanced consoles. He was named EA'`s first Design Fellow. In this talk, he will share what he learned himself and was taught by some of the industry's greatest game designers on how to create addictive games. For more information about this seminar and its speaker, you can visit http://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/170524.html Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series provided by the Stanford Computer Forum. Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 7496 stanfordonline
Cloud in a Bottle
 
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University of Washington Department of Atmospheric Sciences Outreach Presents... ***Cloud in a Bottle*** Clouds are fun to look at, but have you ever tried making one? This video shows what it takes to make a cloud: both in the atmosphere and in the lab. Want to learn more about the atmosphere? Check out our website: http://www.atmos.uw.edu/~outreach University of Washington: http://www.washington.edu UW College of the Environment: http://coenv.washington.edu/ UW Department of Atmospheric Sciences: http://www.atmos.washington.edu/
Views: 8909 UWAtmosOutreach
Psych Intro D: Feedback from Matthew & Phuong - Feb/Mar 2019
 
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Lead Educator, Associate Professor Matthew E. Mundy and Course Mentor, Phuong Hua respond informally to learner activity in the online “Introduction to Psychology: Developmental Psychology“ course by Monash University on FutureLearn This is a two week online course offered as part of a program of “Introduction to Psychology” courses: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/introduction-to-psychology #FLPsychIntro. Topics this week include: 00:04 Hi and welcome 00:37 Developmental milestones. Technology. Susan Greenfield article. * 02:56 The Google Effect. Memory system changes. * 04:21 Continuous v staged development. Sensitive periods. Early childhood development. 05:42 Cultural influence on development. Eg Colour. Ref Sub-Saharan languages. 08:02 Wrap up and goodbyes. *Links or References: (NB you may only be able to access some of these links if you are enrolled in the course): (From time to time we provide links to free abstracts and/or research papers, which we offer as optional additional reading for those who may be interested. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) ABC News story: “Neuroscientist Susan Greenfield warns young brains being re-wired by digital technology” Nov 2014 https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-11-20/neuroscientist-warns-young-brains-being-reshaped-by-technology/5906140 Communications of the ACM article July 2009: “Are We Losing Our Ability to Think Critically?” http://www.asja.net/execdir/awards/2010/Articles-Trade/Trade06.pdf ProQuest LLC. The Citizens’ Voice May 24, 2015 “Google Syndrome A Serious Issue” https://education.biu.ac.il/files/education/shared/google_syndrome.pdf “Visual search for colors as a test of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis” Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract | August 2009 https://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2135776 If you haven’t already, please follow your course mentors on FutureLearn: Phuong Hua and Natalie Doring to stay up to date with key discussion threads and course news. Note, the mentors are predominantly focused in the forum-discussions for the current week, rather than the whole course at any one time, so please try to keep discussions to the active week if you’re hoping to engage with the mentors. Follow course mentor Phuong Hua: https://www.futurelearn.com/profiles/8047512 Follow course mentor Natalie Doring: https://www.futurelearn.com/profiles/8006113 If you’ve enjoyed it, please feel free to review this course on Class-Central: https://www.class-central.com/review/new/11040 Find out about Monash University’s 100% online Graduate Diploma of Psychology course: https://online.monash.edu/course/graduate-diploma-psychology The online Monash Graduate Diploma of Psychology is open to learners worldwide. You may be eligible to receive credit you can use toward the Grad Dip if you successfully complete and upgrade the 6 x 2 week set of courses well as the 6-week final assessment. Find out more about the Final Assessment here: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/introduction-to-psychology/assessment To be offered a place on this final assessment course, you must have successfully completed and upgraded the six courses of the Monash University Introduction to Psychology program, including this “History and Science” course. Other Monash courses available on FutureLearn: http://www.monash.edu/learning-teaching/massive-open-online-courses Please feel free to rate and review this course on Class-Central once you’ve completed it: https://www.class-central.com/review/new/11040 Optional follow: @FLPsychIntro on Twitter. Tag #FLPsychIntro in social media.
What is ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY? What does ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY mean?
 
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What is ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY? What does ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY mean? ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY meaning - ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY definition - ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Abstract photography, sometimes called non-objective, experimental, conceptual or concrete photography, is a means of depicting a visual image that does not have an immediate association with the object world and that has been created through the use of photographic equipment, processes or materials. An abstract photograph may isolate a fragment of a natural scene in order to remove its inherent context from the viewer, it may be purposely staged to create a seemingly unreal appearance from real objects, or it may involve the use of color, light, shadow, texture, shape and/or form to convey a feeling, sensation or impression. The image may be produced using traditional photographic equipment like a camera, darkroom or computer, or it may be created without using a camera by directly manipulating film, paper or other photographic media, including digital presentations. There has been no commonly-used definition of the term "abstract photography". Books and articles on the subject include everything from a completely representational image of an abstract subject matter, such as Aaron Siskind's photographs of peeling paint, to entirely non-representational imagery created without a camera or film, such as Marco Breuer's fabricated prints and books. The term is both inclusive of a wide range of visual representations and explicit in its categorization of a type of photography that is visibly ambiguous by its very nature. Many photographers, critics, art historians and others have written or spoken about abstract photography without attempting to formalize a specific meaning. Alvin Langdon Coburn in 1916 proposed that an exhibition be organized with the title "Abstract Photography", for which the entry form would clearly state that "no work will be admitted in which the interest of the subject matter is greater than the appreciation of the extraordinary." The proposed exhibition did not happen, yet Coburn later created some distinctly abstract photographs. Photographer and Professor of Psychology John Suler, in his essay Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche, said that "An abstract photograph draws away from that which is realistic or literal. It draws away from natural appearances and recognizable subjects in the actual world. Some people even say it departs from true meaning, existence, and reality itself. It stands apart from the concrete whole with its purpose instead depending on conceptual meaning and intrinsic form....Here’s the acid test: If you look at a photo and there’s a voice inside you that says 'What is it?'….Well, there you go. It’s an abstract photograph." Barbara Kasten, also a photographer and professor, wrote that "Abstract photography challenges our popular view of photography as an objective image of reality by reasserting its constructed nature....Freed from its duty to represent, abstract photography continues to be a catchall genre for the blending of mediums and disciplines. It is an arena to test photography." German photographer and photographic theorist Gottfried Jäger used the term "concrete photography", playing off the term "concrete art", to describe a particular kind of abstract photography. He said: "Concrete photography does not depict the visible (like realistic or documentary photography); It does not represent the non-visible (like staged, depictive photography); It does not take recourse to views (like image-analytical, conceptual, demonstrative photography). Instead it establishes visibility. It is only visible, the only-visible. In this way it abandons its media character and gains object character." More recently conceptual artist Mel Bochner hand wrote a quote from the Encyclopædia Britannica that said "Photography cannot record abstract ideas." on a note card, then photographed it and printed it using six different photographic processes. He turned the words, the concept and the visualization of the concept into art itself, and in doing so created a work that presented yet another type of abstract photography, again without ever defining the term itself.
Views: 510 The Audiopedia
Women winning in the marketplace: Jennifer Sherman at TEDxFiDiWomen
 
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Growing up in India, West Africa and the Middle East, Jennifer Sherman was taught how to escape danger zones within a riot, how to distinguish the symptoms of mustard gas from other nerve agents and the treatment of each. She knows, firsthand, the symptoms of dysentery, dehydration and fear. Today, Jennifer is a Senior Director of Applications Strategy at Oracle Corporation where she works with large and small public and private sector organizations looking to transform the capabilities and reach of their supply chains and distribution networks. She believes that efficient, equitable supply chain management can help us rethink the way we make and distribute products around the world, bringing opportunity to new communities that are often ignored today. She holds a BS in Industrial Engineering and an MS in Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management from Stanford University. Event video by: http://repertoireproductions.com/
Views: 8002 TEDx Talks
Mindful Life: Feedback from Craig and Richard - Week 3 - Dec 2017
 
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Course Educators Associate Professor Craig Hassed and Dr Richard Chambers respond to the third week of learner activity in our new online “Maintaining a Mindful Life“ course by Monash University, currently running on FutureLearn #FLMindLife https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/mindfulness-life Topics this week include: 00:05 Hi again. 00:09 Self-compassion, emotional health, pain. Self-criticism v compassion. 00:58 Self-compassion and performance. Cultivating friendliness toward ourselves. 01:54 Why we’re self-critical. Attachment, reactivity. 02:37 Childhood, parenting styles, environment, school, amygdala, social media. 03:27 Self-compassion as a habit, improves performance * 04:16 Mistakes can be learning opportunities. 04:39 Reflecting on mistakes v’s ruminating. Grounded reflection v’ re-living. 05:23 Treating ourselves like a child or wounded animal. We’re all works in progress. 05:39 Dr Kristin Neff’s website and resources self-compassion.org * 05:45 Tend and befriend v fight or flight. Male, female discussion. 07:03 Discussion around family members being more self-compassionate, self-critical. 07:40 Leadership and mindfulness. * 08:28 Self-compassion when facing difficulties. Cultivating qualities by starting small. 09:47 Dealing with chronic pain or emotional pain. Using curiosity. 11:15 Re-wiring the brain for happiness. Gratitude. Lovingkindness. Neuroplasticity. 12:14 Wrapping up. Next week, mindfulness in the broader aspects of life. Quotable quotes: Richard: “You don’t want to tend and befriend a Great White shark… although, Mick Fanning could benefit from that”. Referring to *Links or References: (NB you may only be able to access some of these links if you are enrolled in the course): “A pilot study exploring the relationship between self-compassion, self-judgement, self-kindness, compassion, professional quality of life and wellbeing among UK community nurses.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27621200 2016 Nov, Durkin M1, Beaumont E2, Hollins Martin CJ3, Carson J4. (Please note: We often provide links to free abstracts from research papers, as optional additional reading. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) “Self-compassion increases self-improvement motivation” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645164 2012 Sep, Breines JG1, Chen S. (Please note: We often provide links to free abstracts from research papers, as optional additional reading. Please note there is never a requirement to purchase or read the full papers, which in many cases may require a fee or a paid subscription in order to access.) Dr Kristin Neff Self-Compassion website http://self-compassion.org Mick Fanning, competition Australian surfer became known as ‘Shark Magnet’ after an incident in 2015 when he punched a shark during a competition. http://thenewdaily.com.au/sport/other-sports/2017/07/20/mick-fanning-great-white-shark/ 1st New Zealand Mindful Leaders Conference, March 2018 http://www.confer.co.nz/mindfulleaders2018/ #mindfulleadersnz Psychology Today article “How Do Neuroplasticity and Neurogenesis Rewire Your Brain?” https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201702/how-do-neuroplasticity-and-neurogenesis-rewire-your-brain 6 Feb 2017, Christopher Bergland. Referring to the study “Adult-born neurons modify excitatory synaptic transmission to existing neurons’ https://elifesciences.org/articles/19886 , published in the journal eLife. 30 Jan 2017 Our other course “Mindfulness for Wellbeing and Peak Performance” starts again in February 2018 and offers a beginner-level introduction to mindfulness. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/mindfulness-wellbeing-performance Follow your course mentors on FutureLearn: Dr Sherelle Connaughton and Jen Opie to stay up to date with the main discussion threads and course news. Follow course mentor Dr Sherelle Connaughton: https://www.futurelearn.com/profiles/2055039 Follow course mentor Jen Opie: https://www.futurelearn.com/profiles/2102263 ‘Maintaining a Mindful Life’ by Monash University, available on FutureLearn. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/mindfulness-life “Mindfulness for Wellbeing and Peak Performance” also by Monash University on FutureLearn, starts again on 5 February 2018 and offers a beginner-level introduction to mindfulness. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/mindfulness-wellbeing-performance Optional follow: @FLMindfulness on Twitter. Tag #FLMindLife in social media. Other Monash courses available on FutureLearn: https://www.futurelearn.com/partners/monash-university. Plus our suite of professionally accredited Healthcare Practice courses: https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/food-as-medicine-in-healthcare
Views: 2266 Mindfulness Project
Proper Lab Shoes at UCLA
 
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What shoes would you wear into a research laboratory? Why does UCLA want everyone to wear proper lab shoes?
Views: 6880 UCLA
Stanford's Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, on "The National Problem of Back Pain"
 
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Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, speaks on "The National Problem of Back Pain" at Stanford Back Pain Education Day 2016. ~ Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D., is Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine, Director of the Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory (SNAPL) and Redlich Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, (by courtesy) Neurosciences and Neurology at Stanford University. He is the Immediate Past President of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. Dr. Mackey received his BSE and MSE in Bioengineering from University of Pennsylvania and his PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering as well as MD from University of Arizona. Dr. Mackey is author of over 200 journal articles, book chapters, abstracts, and popular press pieces in addition to numerous national and international lectures. Under Dr. Mackey's leadership, the Stanford Pain Management Center has been designated a Center of Excellence by the American Pain Society, one of only two centers to receive this honor twice. In 2011 he was a member of the Institutes of Medicine committee that issued the report on Relieving Pain in America. He is currently Co-Chair of the Oversight Committee for the NIH/Health and Human Services National Pain Strategy, an effort to establish a national health strategy for pain care, education and research. Under Dr. Sean Mackey's leadership, researchers at the Stanford Pain Management Center and the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory (SNAPL) have made major advances in the understanding of chronic pain as a disease in its own right, one that fundamentally alters the nervous system. Dr. Mackey has overseen efforts to map the specific brain and spinal cord regions that perceive and process pain, which has led to the development of a multidisciplinary treatment model that translates basic science research into innovative therapies to provide more effective, personalized treatments for patients with chronic pain. Learn more about Dr. Mackey: http://stan.md/2dQjlB6 The Division of Pain Medicine at Stanford University seeks to predict, prevent and alleviate pain through science, education, and compassion. ~ Stay Connected! Visit our website: http://med.stanford.edu/pain Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1OxaEoF Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2a9Bhs9 Follow us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2av77MA Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2as125c
Scholarly psychology articles search in Proquest Psychology Journals Database
 
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This demonstration takes you step by step through searching the ProQuest Psychology Journals database. After watching this you will know how to get started with this database.
At war with the world: Antisocial personality disorder
 
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Antisocial personality disorder is a disorder associated with hostility, impulsivity and deceitfulness. Associate professors Birgitte Thylstrup and Morten Hesse, Aarhus University, Center for Alcohol and Drug Research, discuss the clinical features of antisocial personality disorder, as well as how patients with the disorder view themselves, others, and the world. Read more: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314840145_Manual_for_Impulsive_Lifestyle_Counselling Open access: https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-015-0661-0 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5223491/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18485229 Abstracts: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26882500 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18258375 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ADD-02-2016-0004
Views: 20767 Aarhus Universitet
Introduction to Research Ethics Digest
 
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PRIM&R's Research Ethics Digest is an electronic publication that delivers timely and relevant abstracts and full-text articles from a wide array of scholarly journals to the inboxes of PRIM&R members every two months. Please view our tutorial for more information about this valuable member benefit.
The Grievance Studies Papers Are Fantastic! - Part I (THE SAAD TRUTH_742)
 
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Enjoy as I read the titles and abstracts of the first set of papers stemming from the grand project on grievance studies conducted by Peter Boghossian, James Lindsay, and Helen Pluckrose. Wall Street Journal article that reported the Grievance Studies project: https://on.wsj.com/2O3zHuP ________________________________________ Support THE SAAD TRUTH via Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/GadSaad Support THE SAAD TRUTH via PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/GadSaad THE SAAD TRUTH online store: http://www.teespring.com/stores/the-saad-truth Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Dr.Gad.Saad Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GadSaad (@GadSaad)
Views: 19623 Gad Saad