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Properties of Molecular Compounds
 
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Molecular compounds are compounds that are composed of molecules (go figure...). In this video we will discuss the following properties 1) Molecular compounds are composed of molecules 2) Molecular compounds are usually liquid or gas 3) Molecular compounds have low melting and low boiling points 4) Molecular compounds do not conduct heat or electricity Thanks for watching. Please 'like' and 'subscribe' Learning more science at www.thescienceclassroom.org
Views: 18322 The Science Classroom
Molecular Compounds
 
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Learn what molecular compounds are and what properties distinguish them from ionic compounds.
Views: 9092 Teacher's Pet
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 653704 Tyler DeWitt
Chemistry 4.2 Properties of Ionic and Covalent Compounds
 
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A comparison of physical properties for ionic and covalent compounds.
Views: 55520 IsaacsTEACH
Properties of Covalent Compounds
 
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The properties of covalent compounds relate to the weak inter-molecular bonds
Views: 15633 VolkScience
CHEMISTRY 101: Molecular Orbital Theory, Bond order, bond strength, magnetic properties
 
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In this example problem, we show how to fill a molecular orbital diagram for a diatomic molecule and use molecular bond theory to compare bond order, bond strength, and magnetic properties (paramagnetic or diamagnetic).
Views: 185040 Matthew Gerner
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Naming Covalent Molecular Compounds
 
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We'll learn how to write names for compounds that are made of two nonmetals, sometimes called binary compounds. Binary compounds made of two nonmetals are called covalent or molecular because the elements are held together with covalent bonds, and they make molecules. In order to name them, we use the element name for the first element in the chemical formula, and then we use the -ide name for the second name in the chemical formula. Greek prefixes to show the number of atoms of each element, and these are put in front of the element names.
Views: 623455 Tyler DeWitt
Chemistry Lesson: Identifying Ionic vs. Molecular Compounds
 
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https://getchemistryhelp.com/learn-chemistry-fast/ The first step in naming chemical compounds is to determine if the compound is ionic or molecular. This quick chemistry lessons shows how to distinguish between the two types.
Views: 36100 GetChemistryHelp
Properties of Water | Hydrogen Bonding in Water | Biology | Biochemistry
 
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Why is water essential for Life to exist on Earth? We are about 60% water - and there are some organisms that are as much as 90% water! What is so important about water? How does it support life? In this video, we discuss the special properties of water that make it the “Solvent of Life.” Chief among these properties is the extensive Hydrogen Bonding between water molecules that make water an extremely cohesive liquid (the molecules stick together). Due to the extensive hydrogen bonding, water has some emergent properties that impact life on Earth in many ways. These include: Cohesion Adhesion High surface tension High specific heat High heat of vaporization Ice Floats (Ice is less dense as a solid than liquid water) For each of these properties, we discuss how they impact living creatures on Earth. ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Shop Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon! We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Tracy Karin Prell. Tracy is an amazing advocate for science communication. Thank you so much, Tracy! ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Directed by Michael Harrison Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Creative Commons Picture Credits Basilisk running on water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Basiliscus_basiliscus_running_on_water_-_pone.0037300.s001.ogv Author: Minetti et al. xylem http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0089934 Author: Boutilier et al 2014 PLOS Meniscus http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0050320 Author: Jingmin et al 2012 PLOS Little girl drinking https://pixabay.com/en/girl-thirsty-drink-fountain-water-2241750/ Author: brisch27 Army scout drinking https://pixabay.com/en/girl-scout-army-thirsty-sensuality-932421/ Author: AdinaVoicu Water drop Macro View http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=173836&picture=water-drop-macro-view Author: JeanBeauford Woman in the Ocean http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=172525&picture=woman-in-the-ocean Author: JeanBeauford Water on fabric https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_droplet_lying_on_a_damask.jpg Author: Petar Milosevic Water strider https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WaterstriderEnWiki.jpg Author: PD Polar bear on ice https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Polar_Bear_AdF.jpg Author: Arturo de Frias Marques Penguins on ice https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pygoscelis_antarctica_trying_to_get_to_iceberg.wmv.ogv Author: Brocken Inaglory Cells (colourized) https://pixabay.com/en/white-blood-cell-cell-blood-cell-543471 Author: skeeze Hydrogen bonds in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Water strider footage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vesimittareita.ogv Author: Uusijani roadrunner https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Greater_Roadrunner_Walking.jpg Author: Jessie Eastland Partially frozen pond http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=15079&picture=partially-frozen-pond Author: David Wagner
Views: 14895 Socratica
Ferrocene [ Metallocene ] ; structure , bonding and properties
 
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Ferrocene, its structure, bonding and properties
Views: 3046 Priyanka Jain
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2228818 Khan Academy
Covalent Bonding - Drawing & Properties
 
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Practice covalent compounds (molecular compounds): • H₂O Water (dihydrogen monoxide) • O₂ Oxygen • CO₂ Carbon dioxide • HF Hydrogen fluoride • CH₄ Methane • PCl₃ Phosphorous chloride • H₂S Hydrogen sulfide • CCl₄ Tetrachloromethane • NH₃ Ammonia • CS₂ Carbon disulphide
Views: 724 Angles and Acid
Hydrogen bonding in water | Water, acids, and bases | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Reactants and products in reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/hydrogen-bonding-in-water/v/hydrogen-bonding-in-water?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 256037 Khan Academy
Properties of Water
 
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Explore some properties of water with the Amoeba Sisters! It's all about those hydrogen bonds. Video has handout: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts Terms discussed include adhesion, cohesion, surface tension, specific heat - all made possible by those amazing hydrogen bonds. Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology *We mention that water makes up "3/4 of the Earth's surface" and we wish we had said "nearly" This number is going to be an estimate, but here is a source that puts it around 71%. https://water.usgs.gov/edu/earthhowmuch.html We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 619835 Amoeba Sisters
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1402030 CrashCourse
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1597389 CrashCourse
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 55201 Whats Up Dude
Properties of Ionic and Covalent Compounds
 
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What are the properties of ionic compounds and covalent compounds? Why are these properties different? What gives different compounds different properties?
Views: 12298 PHAChemistry
Water - Liquid Awesome: Crash Course Biology #2
 
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Hank teaches us why water is one of the most fascinating and important substances in the universe. Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Review: Re-watch = 00:00 Introduction = 00:42 Molecular structure & hydrogen bonds = 01:38 Cohesion & surface tension = 02:46 Adhesion = 03:31 Hydrophilic substances = 04:42 Hydrophobic substances = 05:14 Henry Cavendish = 05:49 Ice Density = 07:45 Heat Capacity = 09:10 Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Citations: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/youthdevelopment/components/0328-02.html http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/H2OProperties.html http://www.hometrainingtools.com/properties-water-science-teaching-tip/a/1274/ http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/earth/geophysics/h2o7.htm http://www.robinsonlibrary.com/science/chemistry/biography/cavendish.htm http://chemistry.mtu.edu/~pcharles/SCIHISTORY/HenryCavendish.html http://www.nndb.com/people/030/000083778/ http://www.notablebiographies.com/Ca-Ch/Cavendish-Henry.html TAGS: water, hydrogen, oxygen, molecule, covalent bond, cohesion, adhesion, polarity, hydrogen bond, surface tension, capillary action, hydrophilic, hydrophobic, ionic bond, ion, universal solvent, henry cavendish, chemistry, specific gravity, density, heat capacity, evaporation, biology, crashcourse, crash course, hank green Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2939486 CrashCourse
What Are Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about covalent bonds, when learning about properties of matter. When similar atoms react, like non-metals combining with other non-metals, they share electrons. This is covalent bonding. Non-metals have shells of electrons that are normally half or more than half full of electrons. Since they have a strong attraction for a few additional electrons, it is energetically unfavourable for any of them to lose electrons, so they share electrons by overlapping orbitals. This makes a bonding orbital, or covalent bond, that contains two or more electrons. Covalent bonds can be represented by a dot and cross diagram. These diagrams show only the valence electrons. Covalent bonds are directional, which means they are in a fixed position. The overlap between orbitals mean that the atoms in covalent bonds are very close, and make covalent bonds strong. There are two kinds of covalent structure - small molecules, like water, and giant compounds, like diamond. The electrons in the bonds are evenly shared, which means the bonds are not polarised; there is little attraction between molecules, and forces between molecules are weak. Compounds made from small covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points and are volatile. They also don’t conduct electricity. Carbon and silicon tend to form giant covalent compounds. These bond in the same way, but instead of forming small molecules with one or two bonds, they form four, make up huge lattices or chains of many many linked up atoms. Diamond is a common example, and is made up of Carbon. These compounds have very high melting and boiling points because you have to break covalent bonds rather than intermolecular forces to make them free enough to act like liquids or gases. The covalent bonds hold them rigidly in place in the giant lattice. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals
 
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Donate here: http://www.aklectures.com/donate.php Website video link: http://www.aklectures.com/lecture/bonding-and-antibonding-molecular-orbitals Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/aklectures Website link: http://www.aklectures.com
Views: 151800 AK LECTURES
Intermolecular Forces and Boiling Points
 
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Why do different liquids boil at different temperatures? It has to do with how strongly the molecules interact with each other. Find out all the different ways, and how to use them to make predictions about matter! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 467219 Professor Dave Explains
Properties of Ionic and Molecular Compounds Lab
 
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Mrs. Beasley's 4th Block Chemistry Lab
Views: 355 Rhonda Beasley
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1235475 It's AumSum Time
Atoms Bonding Song
 
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Here is a song I created for my 6th grade science students. I hope you enjoy Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Stable atoms, electrons don't leave, outer shell complete Lose one, gain one if it's an unstable one , yes then Most atoms have many shells, hey When it's full begins a new one 2, 8, 18, 32, shell numbers Electron configuration How many electrons you want? Yeah, covalent, it's sharing The covalent bond Molecules formed, elements and compounds Sometimes the atoms share more electrons Share two with partners, a double bond Covalent bonds strong, attraction's not Molecules spread from heating break apart These substances boy, low melting point But giant molecules hold on real strong Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding... Ionic bond gained or lost one It's got power electrical charges Not equal positive charged protons Or negative charged electrons these "Ions" If it's positive, it's a cation Lost electrons yes, this atom is But this one has gained is negative Anion has more electrons than protons Ionic bonds are formed When cations and anions come together now Attracted to each other ionic compound Made of metal also non-metals These compounds not separate molecules See them gathered in ionic lattice High boiling points, high melting points Weak forces molecular lattices Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding... Metallic bonding, metallic bonding Types of bonding metallic elements Cling together, metallic lattice Gotta see the regular arrangement Metal cations with free electrons You know they're traveling by them Atoms clinging, they're clinging Free electrons allow them sticking Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding Sometimes atoms are bonding
Views: 109352 ParrMr
Boiling points of organic compounds | Structure and bonding | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to analyze the different boiling points of organic compounds using intermolecular forces. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/solubility-of-organic-compounds-redo?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
 
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Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
Views: 1568049 CBSE Udaan XI
Ionic Compounds and their properties | The Chemistry Journey | The Fuse School
 
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Learn the basics about Ionic Compounds, how they are formed and what their properties are. At Fuse School, teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. Our OER are available free of charge to anyone. Make sure to subscribe - we are going to create 3000 more! Fuse School is currently running the Chemistry Journey project - a Chemistry Education project by The Fuse School sponsored by Fuse. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Be sure to follow our social media for the latest videos and information! Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseschool Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fuseschool Google+: http://www.gplus.to/FuseSchool Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/virtualschooluk Email: [email protected] Website: www.fuseschool.org This video is distributed under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
Metallic Bonding
 
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021 - Metallic Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how metallic bonding structure creates the different properties of metals. The electron sea model explains how the positive nuclei are locked into a negative sea of delocalized electrons. This sharing of electrons creates metals that are good conductors, malleable, ductile and non-volatile. A shell model can be used to explain certain properties of metals (like melting point). Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:A Plug.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A_plug.jpg. "File:Blacksmith Working.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blacksmith_working.jpg. "File:Ductility.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ductility.svg. "File:Gallium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 13, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gallium_crystals.jpg. "File:Hot Metalwork.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hot_metalwork.jpg. "File:Kanazawa Gold Factory.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kanazawa_Gold_Factory.jpg. "File:Steel Wire rope.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 18, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Steel_wire_rope.JPG. Muskid. English: Scheme for Metallic Bonding, May 2, 2012. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metallic_bonding.svg.
Views: 230689 Bozeman Science
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 327624 Beverly Biology
Elements, Atoms, Molecules, Ions, Ionic and Molecular Compounds, Cations vs Anions, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the difference between elements, atoms, molecules, and ions. It also explains how to distinguish ionic and molecular compounds also known as covalent compounds. Atoms are electrically neutral and contain equal number of protons and electrons. Ions have a net charge and contain a different number of protons and electrons. Positively charged ions are known as cations and negatively charged ions are known as anions. Atoms and Ions have the same number of neutrons. A molecule is particle consisting of multiple atoms. Pure elements are substances composed of one type of atom where as a compound is made up of different types of atoms. Ionic compounds consist of metals and nonmetals and contain ions with charges. Covalent compounds or molecular compounds usually consist of nonmetals.
Properties of Ionic Compounds
 
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In this video we will talk about 4 properties of ionic compounds 1) Ionic compounds are solid crystals at room temperature 2) Ionic compounds have high melting and boiling points 3) Ionic compounds are hard but brittle 4) Ionic compounds conduct electricity when they are liquid or dissolved Please like and subscribe. Find more science at www.thescienceclassroom.org
Views: 40449 The Science Classroom
Find bond order and magnetic property of a molecule in seconds
 
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Learn a quick method to mid out the bond order and also the magnetic property of a molecule by chemistry expert Mr.Gaurav Jhaa www.chemistryconcept.com/questions
Views: 491 ChemistryConcept
6.2 Covalent Bonding and Molecular Compounds
 
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6.2 covers the formation and characteristics of covalent bonds and gives tutorials for electron dot and Lewis notation.
Views: 4253 Peer Vids
Properties of covalent compounds
 
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Description of the properties of covalent compounds for grade 10 science.
Views: 4242 Swanson Does Science
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Polar Bonds and Molecules
 
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Learn about what makes polar bonds polar and how intermolecular forces like hydrogen bonding occur.
Views: 37494 Teacher's Pet
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2192533 CrashCourse
Matric part 1 Chemistry, Nature of Bonding & Properties - Ch 4 - 9th Class Chemistry
 
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ilmkidunya.com has brought to you Lecture of Sibghat Ullah on "9th Class Chemistry Chapter 4 Structure of Molecules. Topic 4.5 Nature of Bonding & Properties". In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Ionic Compounds For more videos of Sibghat Ullah visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study , https://www.instutor.com This lecture is specially recorded for students of 9th class, 9th class from all Punjab Boards and is based on the current curriculum of study for Chemistry book. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 7122 ilmkidunya
Lecture 2.23 Metallic Bonding and Properties of Solids
 
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Classification of properties of Metallic Solids, Molecular Solids, and Ionic Solids.
Views: 638 MrGrodskiChemistry
Ionic Compounds Vs. Molecular Compounds: Know the Key Differences
 
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Chemistry though interesting, is a bit complicated to understand. Complete with formulas, properties, reactions, compounds, molecules and a lot more similar terms, it's natural to be confused at times. So, to put an end to your confusion, we present to you, the differences between ionic and molecular compounds. For more on the comparison between ionic and molecular compounds, visit: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/ionic-compounds-vs-molecular-compounds.html
Views: 4888 Buzzle
National 5: Bonding and Properties
 
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This video covers ionic, covalent molecular, covalent network and metallic bonding. It looks at the structures produced by each type of bonding and what the formula represents. It also covers shapes of covalent molecules. Properties due to bonding are examined; melting and boiling points, conductivity and solubility. Welcome to Miss Adams Chemistry! This channel is dedicated to tutorials and lessons covering the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence Qualifications in Chemistry. This channel is run by Miss Adams, a Scottish Chemistry Teacher. Subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU32Og7N9VTUWL1qfJOPZxA -----------------FOLLOW ME ----------------- Twitter: @MissAdamsChem
Views: 1665 Miss Adams Chemistry
Peptide bond
 
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This lecture explains about peptide bond formation and about the ramachandran plot and protein structure analysis of the peptide bonds. A peptide bond is a chemical bond shaped between two molecules when the carboxyl crew of 1 molecule reacts with the amino team of the opposite molecule, releasing a molecule of water (H2O). This can be a dehydration synthesis reaction (often referred to as a condensation reaction), and most often happens between amino acids. The ensuing CO-NH bond is known as a peptide bond, and the resulting molecule is an amide. The four-atom functional group -C(=O)NH- is referred to as an amide team or (in the context of proteins) a peptide crew. Polypeptides and proteins are chains of amino acids held together via peptide bonds, as is the backbone of PNA. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 31400 Shomu's Biology
Types of Bonds Lab
 
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This is a high school Chemistry experiments that examines ionic and covalent compounds. We use three different test to compare the ionic and covalent compounds. We use melting point, solubility in water, and conductivity.
Views: 38141 Bryan Moss
Properties of compounds Containing Hydrogen Bonding  ( Solubility of hydrogen-Bonded Molecules)
 
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Properties of compounds Containing Hydrogen Bonding Solubility of hydrogen-Bonded Molecules Liquid and Gases Chapter No.4 Chemistry Part 1
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
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This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 109601 Crash Chemistry Academy

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