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Bonds Do NOT Have Energy!
 
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Chemists will tell you that bonds contain energy. In an episode of SciShow Talk Show (link below), Derek from Veritasium says atoms are bonded because they LOSE energy. Derek is definitely closer to the truth, but we take it a step further in this video. SciShow Talk Show episode: http://youtu.be/AAmqeHCFq_8 ________________________________ VIDEO ANNOTATIONS What EXACTLY is Temperature? http://youtu.be/2xaIQjmE5VI Basic FAQs about Black Holes: http://youtu.be/ACCeFVeT984 Why Are Some Things Transparent? http://youtu.be/wDu0KMdDD1I ________________________________ SCIENCE ASYLUM STUFF Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/ScienceAsylum Advanced Theoretical Physics (eBook): https://gumroad.com/l/ubSc Merchandise: http://scienceasylum.spreadshirt.com/ More videos at: http://www.youtube.com/TheScienceAsylum Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ScienceAsylum Twitter: @nicklucid http://twitter.com/nicklucid Instagram: @nicklucid https://instagram.com/nicklucid/ Tumblr: http://nicklucid.tumblr.com/ Google+: http://www.google.com/+Scienceasylum Main Site: http://www.scienceasylum.com/ Vlog: http://www.youtube.com/TheNickLucid ________________________________ COOL LINKS & SOURCES Frame of Essence's video response: http://youtu.be/XEM9TWNcX0M Crash Course video on Cellular Respiration: http://youtu.be/00jbG_cfGuQ UC David ChemWiki: http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Biological_Chemistry/Biochemical_Energy/ATP%2F%2FADP Hyperphysics: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/chemical/bond.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/molecule/boneng.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/organic/sugar.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mechanics/gravpe.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/gpot.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/elepe.html Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_respiration https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_triphosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_diphosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_bond https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binding_energy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibbs_free_energy ________________________________ IMAGE CREDITS Logo designed by: Ben Sharef Stock Photos and Clipart - Wikimedia Commons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page - Openclipart http://openclipart.org/ - or I made them myself... Molecules in Thumbnail: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucose-3D-vdW.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucose-3D-balls.png M&Ms in Thumbnail: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Plain-M%26Ms-Pile.jpg Animated Fire GIFs: http://forum.terasology.org/threads/512x-new-animated-tiles-fire-and-portal-30frames.802/
Views: 31312 The Science Asylum
Bonds DON'T Store Energy - Snatoms
 
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Bonds are not like glow sticks, in that energy is not given off when you break them. Energy is released when bonds form. So for a chemical reaction to be exothermic (to give off energy) then the bonds formed during the reaction must give off more energy than was required to break bonds in the reaction. Music by Kevin MacLeod, http://incompetech.com "Pamgaea"
Views: 8703 Snatoms
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1587514 CrashCourse
Bond Energy & Bond Length, Forces of Attraction & Repulsion - Chemistry
 
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This video provides a basic introduction into bond energy and bond length. It explains how to determine the bond length of a molecule given a graph that shows the potential energy of two atoms and the internuclear distance in nm. It explains why atoms form bonds as they approach each other and why they repel each other when they get too close. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent Bonding
 
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019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 184317 Bozeman Science
Chemical Energetics - Bond breaking and bond making
 
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Energy changes in a reaction in terms of bond breaking and bond making. I am available for private tutoring via Skype or Google+ Hangouts. Send me a message on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/TachyonEd to arrange a lesson today! exothermic, endothermic, bonds, breaking, making, chemical, energetics, energy, energy level diagram, reactants, products, energy change, heat, enthalpy,entropy, heat change, thermodynamics, cells, battery, fuel, nuclear, thermal, thermochemistry, igcse, gcse, ap, ib, cambridge, london, oxford, ucas, uk, 0620, a levels, o levels, ks3, ks4
Views: 33737 Alex Tah
Bond Length and Bond Energy
 
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052 - Bond Length and Bond Energy In this video Paul Andersen explains how the bond length and bond energy are calculated using an energy distance graph. The strength of the bond is determined by the charges in the constituent atoms. As the charge increases the bond energy increases and the bond length decreases. Increasing numbers of bonds will also increase the energy and decrease the length. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cdang. Deutsch: Prinzip Des Laue-Verfahrens: Ein Einfallender Monochromatischer Röntgenstrahl Trifft Auf Ein Einkristall, Wird an Diesem in Bestimmte Richtungen Gebeugt Und Erzeugt Auf Der Dahinter Liegenden Fotoplatte Ein Beugungsmuster, March 30, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cliche_de_laue_principe.svg. "File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png. "File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png.
Views: 135635 Bozeman Science
Bond enthalpy and enthalpy of reaction | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to bond enthalpy, and how to use bond enthalpies to calculate enthalpy of reaction. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/thermodynamics-chemistry/enthalpy-chemistry-sal/v/2015-ap-chemistry-free-response-7?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/thermodynamics-chemistry/enthalpy-chemistry-sal/v/hess-s-law-example?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 146682 Khan Academy
Why Do Atoms Bond?
 
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SciShow explains what makes atoms bond (and what makes them sometimes seem promiscuous). Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources:
Views: 378857 SciShow
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2221902 Khan Academy
Hydrogen bonding in water | Water, acids, and bases | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Reactants and products in reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/hydrogen-bonding-in-water/v/hydrogen-bonding-in-water?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 255216 Khan Academy
Chemical energy, chemical bonds and chemical reactions
 
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Overview of chemical energy and the energetics of chemical reactions
Views: 18696 SciencePrimer
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 29486 Socratica
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 122610 AtomicSchool
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 39497 Socratica
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1218970 It's AumSum Time
Energy & Chemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #17
 
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Grumpy Professor Hank admits to being wrong about how everything is chemicals. But he now wants you to listen as he blows your mind with a new sweeping statement: everything (yes, really everything this time) is energy. What?! This week, Hank takes us on a quick tour of how thermodynamics is applied in chemistry using his toy trebuchet as an example, because he is a proud nerd. -- Table of Contents Everything Is Energy 0:00 Forms of Energy 1:07 Potential Energy 2:11 Chemical Energy 1:55 Energy Is Constant & Law of Thermodynamics 2:49 System & Surroundings 5:03 Energy Transfer 4:57 Work 3:25 Heat 4:05 Trebuchets 0:48 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 899715 CrashCourse
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 946193 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Energy and Bonding
 
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A video to show and explain the energies and enthalpies of different chemical compounds due to their covalent bonds.
Views: 412 PoETheeds
How atoms bond - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-atoms-bond-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Atoms can (and do) bond constantly; it's how they form molecules. Sometimes, in an atomic tug-of-war, one atom pulls electrons from another, forming an ionic bond. Atoms can also play nicely and share electrons in a covalent bond. From simple oxygen to complex human chromosome 13, George Zaidan and Charles Morton break down the humble chemical bond. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Bevan Lynch.
Views: 372583 TED-Ed
01 Why Do Bonds Form?
 
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The formation of bonds is explained in terms of changes in chemical potential energy as the distance between atoms changes. Forces of attraction and repulsion are referred to. Learners are reminded why noble gases do not form bonds.
Views: 1204 Mindset Learn
Mitochondria: How Our Bodies Produce Energy from Nutrients- Thomas DeLauer
 
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Click Here to Subscribe: http://Bit.ly/ThomasVid Website: http://ThomasDeLauer.com Mitochondria: How Our Bodies Produce Energy from Nutrients - Thomas DeLauer… Mitochondria are known as the powerhouses of the cell and are found in the cells of every complex organism. Mitochondria are organelles that act like a digestive system which takes in nutrients, breaks them down, and creates energy rich molecules for the cell. They are the parts of cells that turn sugars, fats and proteins that we eat, into forms of chemical energy that the body can use to carry on living and they produce about 90% of the chemical energy that cells need to survive. Structure: They are made of two membranes: The outer membrane covers the organelle and contains it like a skin - The inner membrane folds over many times and creates layered structures called crista. The fluid contained in the mitochondria is called the matrix. The folding of the inner membrane increases the surface area inside the organelle - since many of the chemical reactions happen on the inner membrane, the increased surface area creates more space for reactions to occur. Cellular Respiration in Mitochondria: The matrix is filled with water and proteins (enzymes) - Those proteins take organic molecules, such as pyruvate and acetyl CoA, and chemically digest them. Proteins embedded in the inner membrane and enzymes involved in the citric acid cycle ultimately release water and carbon dioxide molecules from the breakdown of oxygen and glucose. The mitochondria are the only places in the cell where oxygen is reduced and eventually broken down into water. Mitochondria are also involved in controlling the concentration of calcium (Ca2+) ions within the cell - they work closely with the endoplasmic reticulum to limit the amount of calcium in the cytosol. Multiple Other Functions of the Mitochondria: As Energy Converters- Mitochondria, using oxygen available within the cell convert chemical energy from food in the cell to energy in a form usable to the host cell. The process is called oxidative phosphorylation and it happens inside mitochondria. In the matrix of mitochondria the reactions known as the citric acid or Krebs cycle produce a chemical called NADH. NADH is then used by enzymes embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) - In ATP the energy is stored in the form of chemical bonds. These bonds can be opened and the energy redeemed. In return the host cell provides physical protection and a constant supply of food and oxygen. As Determinators- Recent research indicates that in addition to converting energy mitochondria play quite a large part in determining when a cell will die by ordinary cell death (necrosis) or programmed cell death (apoptosis.) In apoptosis the mitochondrion releases a chemical, cytochrome c, and this can trigger programmed cell death. Mitochondria are also thought to influence, by exercising a veto, which eggs in a woman should be released during ovulation and which should be destroyed by programmed cell death (apoptosis.) This is part of a process called atresia - in this process mitochondria and the nucleus of the cell in which the mitochondria reside, are screened for biochemical compatibility. The pairs that are incompatible are shut down by programmed cell death. References: 1) https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/mitochondria-14053590 2) Andrew Rader Studios. (n.d.). Biology4Kids.com: Cell Structure: Mitochondria. Retrieved from http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell_mito.html 3) Mitochondrion – much more than an energy converter | British Society for Cell Biology. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://bscb.org/learning-resources/softcell-e-learning/mitochondrion-much-more-than-an-energy-converter/ 4) Mitochondria. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Biology/mitochondria.html 5) What are Mitochondria? | MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.mrc-mbu.cam.ac.uk/what-are-mitochondria
Views: 37458 Thomas DeLauer
Chemical Bonds
 
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This clip provides an overview of chemical bonds, explaining that a chemical bond is not a physical structure but an energy relationship that involves interactions between the electrons of the reacting atoms. The clip also discusses the various types of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent and hydrogen).
Views: 1137 INTELECOM
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
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Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 119620 AtomicSchool
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 52994 Whats Up Dude
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1392862 CrashCourse
Introduction to Bond Energies (enthalpies)
 
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Bond breaking = endo = energy absorbed = COLD Bond making = exo = energy released = HOT If a reaction is overall exothermic then more energy was released than absorbed. Stop reading here. (OK if red is the hot water tap and blue is the cold water tap - isn't red light low energy and blue light high energy?)
Views: 64696 Richard Thornley
PHYSICISTS ARE FOOLS PART 4: ATOMS, LIGHT, CHEMICAL BONDS
 
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HOW ENERGY AND MATTER COMBINE TO FORM ATOMS,TRANSMIT LIGHT, AND FORM COVALENT CHEMICAL BONDS
Views: 39 Richard Rose
Enthalpy: Crash Course Chemistry #18
 
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Energy is like the bestest best friend ever and yet, most of the time we take it for granted. Hank feels bad for our friend and wants us to learn more about it so that we can understand what it's trying to tell us - like that any bond between two atoms contains energy. How much energy? That's not the simplest question to answer, but today Hank will answer it (kinda), by teaching us about a nifty little thing called enthalpy. If you are paying attention to this episode you'll learn what the state function is, and how it varies from a path-dependent function; why enthalpy change is different from heat; that bonds are energy and to form and break them they release and absorb heat to and from their environment. You'll get the quickest introduction to calorimetry ever (more on that in upcoming episodes) and learn the power of Hess's Law and how to use Germain Hess's concept of the standard enthalpy of formation to calculate exactly how much heat is produced by any chemical reaction. So much to learn! Let's get started! -- Table of Contents State Function 1:50 Path-Dependent Function 1:15 Enthalpy 2:58 Bonds are Energy 5:10 Colorimetry 5:36 Hess' Law 6:19 Standard Enthalpy of Formation 7:24 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1516287 CrashCourse
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 209512 Professor Dave Explains
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
01:02:51
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Scientists Get First Glimpse of a Chemical Bond Being Born
 
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Scientists have used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get the first glimpse of the transition state where two atoms begin to form a weak bond on the way to becoming a molecule. This fundamental advance, reported Feb. 12 in Science Express and long thought impossible, will have a profound impact on the understanding of how chemical reactions take place and on efforts to design reactions that generate energy, create new products and fertilize crops more efficiently. “This is the very core of all chemistry. It’s what we consider a Holy Grail, because it controls chemical reactivity,” said Anders Nilsson, a professor at the SLAC/Stanford SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis and at Stockholm University who led the research. “But because so few molecules inhabit this transition state at any given moment, no one thought we’d ever be able to see it.”
Sigma and Pi Bonds: Hybridization Explained!
 
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Sigma bonds are the FIRST bonds to be made between two atoms. They are made from hybridized orbitals. Pi bonds are the SECOND and THIRD bonds to be made. They are made from leftover "p" orbitals. Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 1215196 chemistNATE
Ionic Bond | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1052899 It's AumSum Time
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1211726 kosasihiskandarsjah
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic Bonding Part 2
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll look at the details of ionic bonding, using sodium chloride as an example. Both atoms have unfilled valence shells, which are the outermost energy level. Electrons are transferred from the metal to the nonmetal, creating ions with an opposite charge. The atoms are then held together because of the attraction between the opposite charges.
Views: 436130 Tyler DeWitt
Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals, Sigma and Pi Bonds, Sp Sp2 Sp3, Organic Chemistry, Bonding
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains the hybridization of atomic orbitals. It discusses how to determine the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule as well determining if a carbon is sp, sp2, or sp3 hybridized. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Valence Bond Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UP4LhDhoUE Molecular Orbital Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P21OjJ9lDcs Orbitals, Atomic Energy Levels, & Sublevels Explained! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sLXUr2HWIs How To Receive Tutoring and Get Paid At The Same Time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8A8JTpOWCQ Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Excel For Beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK-uNYuvcag Here is a list of topics: 1. Atomic Orbitals - S, px, py, and pz orbitals 2. Hybrid Orbitals vs Unhybridized Orbitals 3. Sp, Sp2, and SP3 hybridized Orbitals 4. S character vs P Character 5. Bond Strength of Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 6. Bond Length of Triple Bonds and Single Bonds 7. Sigma Bonds vs Pi Bonds 8. More Examples on Structure and Bonding 9. Electron Configuration of Carbon and Valence Bond Theory 10. Electron Configuration of Hybrid Orbitals - sp sp2 and sp3 11. dsp3 and d2sp3 hybridization 12. Hybridization of Lone pairs - Localized vs Delocalized Electrons 13. Hybridization of Lone pairs in resonance structures 14. Sigma and Pi Bonds In Single, Double, and Triple Bonds 15. Sigma Bonds and Overlap of Atomic Orbitals 16. Mixing Atomic Orbitals to form Hybrid Orbitals 17. Unhybridized P orbitals and pi bonding 18. Structure of Ethane With Hybrid Orbitals 19 Ethene or Ethylene Hybridization and Atomic Orbitals 20. Molecular Orbital Theory 21. Structure & Bonding of Ethyne or Acetylene - sigma and pi bonds 22. valence bond theory
Electron Shells & Chemical Bonds - Anatomy & Physiology - 3.5
 
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Electron Shells & Chemical Bonds - Anatomy & Physiology - 3.5 Visit: http://academyofone.org Forum: http://www.academyofone.org/forums/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Academyofone1 Article: http://www.academyofone.org/electron-shells-chemical-bonds-anatomy-physiology-3-5/ Royalty free music licensed by http://www.stockmusic.net Royalty free photos licensed by http://mbsy.co/Bigstock/19003404 (Affiliate Link) Script: When you hang out with someone for a long period of time you will get to know them very well. You start to feel the other person’s emotions. You start to form a friendship bond. This is great and this makes life worth living and... Wait... I just thought of something. You know who else has a bond... atoms. What’s going on everybody! My name is Jack Jenkins and this is Academy of One. Today I am going to talk about electron shells & chemical bonds. Molecules are formed when atoms come together and they stay together. They stay together thanks to a special connection scientist call a chemical bond. A chemical bond is formed when the electrons of two atoms come together. See, electrons form around the nucleus. For this video we will use the wrong but simple orbital model. The term for the space that electrons occupy is called electronic shells. There are seven known shells. K, l, m, n, o, p and q. Each of these different shells have different energy levels. The closer it is to the nucleus, the weaker the potential energy level is. This is because the father away the electron is the less force the nucleus is putting on it. So electrons in the shell k has a very low potential energy level compared to those in q. Really quick, you will hear electron shells and energy levels interchanged in some textbooks and with some people. So when you hear energy levels just think of electron shells. Electron shells are rather big spaces. To make it easier we separate the space within it. We call each individual space within an electron shell a subshell. Each shell has one or more subshells within it. For example, shell k has one subshell in it... s. S has space to hold two electrons in it. I want a list of non-ionic elements that can fit inside of shell k. Non-ionic elements are elements that haven’t lost or gained electrons. The only elements that can fit within the s subset is Hydrogen and helium. Hydrogen only has one electron so that fits in k. Helium has two electrons and that fills up shell k and subset s. Any other elements would need to take another shell because there ain’t no room for their electrons. Subshells come in different shapes and sizes. The first subshell is s. S, as we just learned, has the capacity to hold two electrons. Next up is subshell p. Subshell p has enough space to fit six electrons. Subshell d can fit up to fourteen electrons. Lastly there is subshell g which can fit up to eighteen electrons. As we move further away from the nucleus, the more space we have for the shells hence the more space we have for more subshells. Shell k has one subshell, s, and can fit only two electrons. Shell l has two subshells a s subshell and a p subshell. Since s can hold two electrons and p can hold six the total number of electrons shell l can have is eight. This pattern continues on for the rest of the shells. If you want more information on subshells and shells as well as more examples of elements within subshells go to academyofone.org and sign up to the upcoming course on chemistry. So what happens if we have hydrogen? Hydrogen has one atom so there is just one atom floating in the s sub-shell. That’s bad. That s subshell wants to be filled up. So the s subshell sees another hydrogen with a lonely s shell and decides to team up together. The electrons combine to form a molecule of hydrogen. This is basically what we call our chemical bond. The bonding of lonely electrons. This also helps explain why you usually see hydrogens in pairs. Because otherwise it will be lonely. There are a bunch of different types of chemical bonds. The first one is an ionic bond. I already said what an ion was. An ion is when an atom losses or gains an electron. When it loses an electron we call it a cation and the atom becomes positive. When the atom gains an electron we call it an anion and the atom becomes nega-tive. An ionic bond is when an atom forms by transferring an electron to another atom. An example is with sodium chloride. A sodium will give the chloride an electron to fill up its subshell. This will make the chloride negative and the sodium positive. Opposites attract so the sodium will pull the chloride to it and they will be connected. It’s like putting magnets of opposite poles together.
Views: 707 Academy of One
CHEMISTRY 101: Molecular Orbital Theory, Bond order, bond strength, magnetic properties
 
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In this example problem, we show how to fill a molecular orbital diagram for a diatomic molecule and use molecular bond theory to compare bond order, bond strength, and magnetic properties (paramagnetic or diamagnetic).
Views: 181564 Matthew Gerner
√ Bonding in carbon compounds | Energy | iitutor
 
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https://www.iitutor.com/ In organic compounds carbon atoms almost always form four bonds. This suggests that the carbon atom’s four valence electrons are all involved in bonding. An examination of simple carbon-base molecules like methane (CH4) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) indicates that in these compounds the carbon atom forms four identical single covalent bonds and that the angles between the bonds are 109.5 . It can be predicted from the valence shell electron pair is required to minimise the electrostatic repulsion between them. The central role of carbon in organic chemistry depends on the fact carbon atoms can form chains of virtually unlimited length containing a succession of carbon-carbons bonds. The valence electrons not involved in forming carbon-carbon bonds are used in forming bonds with atoms of other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and halogens. The properties of carbon that allow it to form a huge number and variety of compounds include: • four outer shell valence electrons • can form single, double and triple bonds • can form chains and rings, which can be branched or unbranched • can share electrons with other non-metals Carbon atoms can bond to one another by single, double or triple covalent bonds. Lewis electron-dot diagrams do not show the spatial distribution of bonds in three dimensions. Carbon-carbon single bonds Single covalent bonds around a carbon atom are arranged tetrahedrally (bond angle=109.28 ). Methane is a good example of this arrangement of carbon-hydrogen single bonds. The two simplest molecules containing carbon-carbon single bonds are ethane (CH3CH3) and propane (CH 3CH2CH3). In these compounds each carbon atom forms four single bonds which again have a tetrahedral orientation. In the case of CH3CH3 three of the bonds formed by the carbon atoms are C-H bonds, while the other bond is a C-C bond. The length of the single C-C bond in these compounds has been found to be 0.154 nm. Carbon-carbon double bonds The compound ethene (CH2CH2) is the simplest carbon compound containing a C=C double bond. In this case only two of each carbon atom's four valence electrons are used in bonding with hydrogen atoms. Hence each carbon atom shares two pairs of electrons with another carbon atom. These two pairs of electrons constitute a double bond. The presence of one double covalent bond forces the bonding electrons into a planar arrangement (bond angle=120 ), so the structure of ethane (ethylene) is planar. An examination of compounds such as ethene (CH2CH2 ) indicates that the C=C bond length is 0.134 nm, the bond angles are 120°, and the geometric arrangement of the two carbon atoms and adjoining hydrogen atoms is planar. This again can be explained in terms of the VSEPR theory. In using the VSEPR theory the C=C double bond is viewed as a single region of charge. To minimise electron repulsion the three electron regions around each carbon atom adopt a planar orientation with bond angles of 120°.
Views: 5283 iitutor.com
Covalent Bond
 
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DeltaStep is a social initiative by graduates of IIM-Ahmedabad, IIM-Bangalore, IIT-Kharagpur, ISI-Kolkata, Columbia University (USA), NTU (Singapore) and other leading institutes. At DeltaStep, we understand that just like every child has a unique face, a unique fingerprint; he has a unique learning ability as well. Hence we have built an intelligent adaptive learning system that delivers a tailor-made learning solution and helps a student to learn at his own pace because when it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. Learn from 1000s of such interesting videos, practice from more than 1,00,000 questions, learn complex concepts through games, take timed tests, get detailed reports & in-depth analysis even via SMS and Whatsapp and many more amazing features. Class wise mapping available for all leading boards including ICSE and CBSE. Create your personal learning account. Register for FREE at www.deltastep.com.
Views: 62368 DeltaStep
Chemical Bonds In The Body - Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Ionic Bonds And Covalent Bonds
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
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Chemical Bonds
 
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Chemical Bonding Combining of elements to form new substances 1st energy level holds 2 electrons 2nd and 3rd energy levels hold 8 electrons Valence electrons = electrons found in the outermost energy level Get More at www.tutorialshero.com
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Covalent Bond Energy Example
 
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Example solution to a Covalent Bond Energy problem from the covalent bond energy problem set form SciencePrimer.com. The problem set can be viewed at http://www.scienceprimer.com/covalent-bond-energy-qs
Views: 1786 SciencePrimer
Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 2 part A Chemistry Lecture
 
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Chapter 2 Basic Chemistry and BioChemistry, A&P Lecture. Please be sure to view Chapter 2 Part B at: https://youtu.be/XJfBeRvMnTY Please leave questions or comments below or you may email me at: [email protected] Text: Elaine Marieb & Katja Hoehn Human Anatomy and Physiology 10th edition. Pearson Education Inc 2016. The Human Body: An Orientation. Topics covered: Matter & Energy: Basic Chemistry Matter, States of Matter,Energy,Forms of Energy, Chemical Energy, Mechanical Energy, Electrical Energy, Radiant or Electromagnetic Energy,Kinetic vs potential Energy,Energy forms conversion, atoms and elements: atoms, elements, atomic symbol,protons, neutrons, electrons,planetary model, orbital model, atomic number, atomic mass,isotopes, atomic weight,Molecule, compound, radioisotopes molecules and mixtures: solutions,molarity, moles, molarity, solvent, solute,Avogadro’s number, colloids ,mixtures and compounds chemical bonds: electron shells, octet rules, valance shell, energy levels, ionic bonds, covalent bonds, polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds chemical reactions: decomposition, catabolism synthesis, anabolism exchange reactions, reduction-oxidation, REDOX, exergonic reactions, endergonic reactions, catalyst, enzymes
Views: 62047 Fuzail Majoo
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
The Periodic Table: Atomic Radius, Ionization Energy, and Electronegativity
 
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Why is the periodic table arranged the way it is? There are specific reasons, you know. Because of the way we organize the elements, there are special patterns that emerge. And you know how Professor Dave feels about patterns. He likes them. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
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