Home
Search results “Energy in chemical bonds is a form of”
Bonds Do NOT Have Energy!
 
04:46
Chemists will tell you that bonds contain energy. In an episode of SciShow Talk Show (link below), Derek from Veritasium says atoms are bonded because they LOSE energy. Derek is definitely closer to the truth, but we take it a step further in this video. SciShow Talk Show episode: http://youtu.be/AAmqeHCFq_8 ________________________________ VIDEO ANNOTATIONS What EXACTLY is Temperature? http://youtu.be/2xaIQjmE5VI Basic FAQs about Black Holes: http://youtu.be/ACCeFVeT984 Why Are Some Things Transparent? http://youtu.be/wDu0KMdDD1I ________________________________ SCIENCE ASYLUM STUFF Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/ScienceAsylum Advanced Theoretical Physics (eBook): https://gumroad.com/l/ubSc Merchandise: http://scienceasylum.spreadshirt.com/ More videos at: http://www.youtube.com/TheScienceAsylum Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ScienceAsylum Twitter: @nicklucid http://twitter.com/nicklucid Instagram: @nicklucid https://instagram.com/nicklucid/ Tumblr: http://nicklucid.tumblr.com/ Google+: http://www.google.com/+Scienceasylum Main Site: http://www.scienceasylum.com/ Vlog: http://www.youtube.com/TheNickLucid ________________________________ COOL LINKS & SOURCES Frame of Essence's video response: http://youtu.be/XEM9TWNcX0M Crash Course video on Cellular Respiration: http://youtu.be/00jbG_cfGuQ UC David ChemWiki: http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Biological_Chemistry/Biochemical_Energy/ATP%2F%2FADP Hyperphysics: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/chemical/bond.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/molecule/boneng.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/organic/sugar.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mechanics/gravpe.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/gpot.html http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/elepe.html Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_respiration https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_triphosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenosine_diphosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_bond https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binding_energy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibbs_free_energy ________________________________ IMAGE CREDITS Logo designed by: Ben Sharef Stock Photos and Clipart - Wikimedia Commons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page - Openclipart http://openclipart.org/ - or I made them myself... Molecules in Thumbnail: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucose-3D-vdW.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beta-D-glucose-3D-balls.png M&Ms in Thumbnail: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Plain-M%26Ms-Pile.jpg Animated Fire GIFs: http://forum.terasology.org/threads/512x-new-animated-tiles-fire-and-portal-30frames.802/
Views: 47390 The Science Asylum
Chemical Energetics - Bond breaking and bond making
 
09:44
Energy changes in a reaction in terms of bond breaking and bond making. I am available for private tutoring via Skype or Google+ Hangouts. Send me a message on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/TachyonEd to arrange a lesson today! exothermic, endothermic, bonds, breaking, making, chemical, energetics, energy, energy level diagram, reactants, products, energy change, heat, enthalpy,entropy, heat change, thermodynamics, cells, battery, fuel, nuclear, thermal, thermochemistry, igcse, gcse, ap, ib, cambridge, london, oxford, ucas, uk, 0620, a levels, o levels, ks3, ks4
Views: 38722 Alex Tah
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
09:46
Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1818822 CrashCourse
Bonds DON'T Store Energy - Snatoms
 
02:09
Bonds are not like glow sticks, in that energy is not given off when you break them. Energy is released when bonds form. So for a chemical reaction to be exothermic (to give off energy) then the bonds formed during the reaction must give off more energy than was required to break bonds in the reaction. Music by Kevin MacLeod, http://incompetech.com "Pamgaea"
Views: 11104 Snatoms
Bond Energy & Bond Length, Forces of Attraction & Repulsion - Chemistry
 
11:36
This video provides a basic introduction into bond energy and bond length. It explains how to determine the bond length of a molecule given a graph that shows the potential energy of two atoms and the internuclear distance in nm. It explains why atoms form bonds as they approach each other and why they repel each other when they get too close. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Energy & Chemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #17
 
09:26
Grumpy Professor Hank admits to being wrong about how everything is chemicals. But he now wants you to listen as he blows your mind with a new sweeping statement: everything (yes, really everything this time) is energy. What?! This week, Hank takes us on a quick tour of how thermodynamics is applied in chemistry using his toy trebuchet as an example, because he is a proud nerd. -- Table of Contents Everything Is Energy 0:00 Forms of Energy 1:07 Potential Energy 2:11 Chemical Energy 1:55 Energy Is Constant & Law of Thermodynamics 2:49 System & Surroundings 5:03 Energy Transfer 4:57 Work 3:25 Heat 4:05 Trebuchets 0:48 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1000406 CrashCourse
Covalent Bonding
 
07:01
019 - Covalent Bonding In this video Paul Andersen explains how covalent bonds form between atoms that are sharing electrons. Atoms that have the same electronegativity create nonpolar covalent bonds. The bond energy and bond length can be determined by graphing the potential energy versus the distance between atoms. Atoms that share electrons unequally form nonpolar covalent bonds. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "Electronegativities of the Elements (data Page)." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electronegativities_of_the_elements_(data_page)&oldid=565034286. "File:Covalent Bond Hydrogen.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Covalent_bond_hydrogen.svg. "File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg. "File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hydrogen-chloride-3D-vdW.png. "File:Magnesium Crystals.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magnesium_crystals.jpg. "File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Methane-3D-space-filling.svg. "File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Periodic Trends.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic_trends.svg. "File:Sugar 2xmacro.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 12, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sugar_2xmacro.jpg.
Views: 198641 Bozeman Science
Bond Length and Bond Energy
 
06:42
052 - Bond Length and Bond Energy In this video Paul Andersen explains how the bond length and bond energy are calculated using an energy distance graph. The strength of the bond is determined by the charges in the constituent atoms. As the charge increases the bond energy increases and the bond length decreases. Increasing numbers of bonds will also increase the energy and decrease the length. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cdang. Deutsch: Prinzip Des Laue-Verfahrens: Ein Einfallender Monochromatischer Röntgenstrahl Trifft Auf Ein Einkristall, Wird an Diesem in Bestimmte Richtungen Gebeugt Und Erzeugt Auf Der Dahinter Liegenden Fotoplatte Ein Beugungsmuster, March 30, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cliche_de_laue_principe.svg. "File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ethane-A-3D-balls.png. "File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 15, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hexamethylbenzene-3D-balls.png.
Views: 159963 Bozeman Science
GCSE Chemistry 1-9: Bond Breaking and Bond Forming - Exothermic or Endothermic?
 
03:07
7.12 Recall that the breaking of bonds is endothermic and the making of bonds is exothermic
Views: 3551 Mr Barnes
Why Do Atoms Bond?
 
02:24
SciShow explains what makes atoms bond (and what makes them sometimes seem promiscuous). Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources:
Views: 391722 SciShow
Chemical energy, chemical bonds and chemical reactions
 
07:19
Overview of chemical energy and the energetics of chemical reactions
Views: 21298 SciencePrimer
The Law of Conservation of Energy | Forms of Energy
 
03:56
The law of conservation of energy is FASCINATING! Especially when you understand the different forms of energy and how they react! Now onto the topic at hand, the conservation of energy, and energy in general. So the law of the conservation of energy states that, in a closed system, that is, a system that isolated from its surroundings, the total energy of the system is conserved. Or, more loosely stated, energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or transformed. This is also known as the first law of thermodynamics. So what do I mean by cannot be created or destroyed. If a bomb explodes its creating energy right? And when a rolling ball stops rolling its energy must have been destroyed! Well, no. Because energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or transformed. Let’s talk a little more about energy. The SI unit for energy is the joule named after James Prescott Joule and there are different forms of energy. I’m going to discuss five. #1 is Kinetic energy. This is the energy of motion. Any object that is moving through space has kinetic energy. This includes a ball thrown through the air, a swimming fish, and a flying space shuttle. #2 is Potential energy. This is the energy an object has the potential due to its position with respect to some reference point. So, a book set on a shelf has potential energy because it has the potential to fall. A ball at the top of a hill also has potential energy because it can roll down. In both cases the potential energy would be transformed to kinetic energy. #3 Chemical energy. This is the energy stored in chemical bonds and released through chemical reactions. The bomb example is not energy being created, but energy being transformed from chemical energy to thermal energy. Solar energy is is transformed into chemical through photosynthesis, so the energy from the sun is literally being stored in chemical bonds within the plants. #4 Electrical energy. This energy due to the separation of charges and flow of electrons, called an electrical current. All your household appliances use electrical energy and convert it to kinetic energy to move the blades of a blender of thermal energy to toast your bread. It is also the energy stored in batteries. And Finally #5 Thermal energy. This energy is given off as heat. When you start a campfire, you are breaking chemical bonds in the wood and transferring the chemical energy to thermal energy. Friction is another example. When a ball is rolling across the ground there is friction between the ball and the ground and this friction converts kinetic energy into thermal energy. That’s why you can warm up your hands by rubbing them together. So those are the five types of energy you should be familiar with, there are others, but those are the main ones. All those examples illustrate the conservation of energy. Energy cannot be created or destroyed. I hope this video helped you and that you enjoyed seeing my face. Be sure to if you’re not a subscriber you should do so now and check out my other videos. If you have any additional questions feel free to throw them in the comment. I’ll catch you next time.
Views: 6250 2 Minute Classroom
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
06:11
Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1463436 It's AumSum Time
Enthalpies of Reactions - Using Average Bond Enthalpies - Chemistry Tutorial
 
07:49
This tutorial covers how to calculate the enthaply of reaction for a given equation using average bond enthalpies. This tutorial gives several examples of how to calculate the enthalpy of a reaction by determining the number and types of bonds broken and formed and using the average bond enthalpies associated with those bonds. https://www.thechemistrysolution.com/
Views: 85217 TheChemistrySolution
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
07:20
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1094272 Tyler DeWitt
How atoms bond - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
03:34
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-atoms-bond-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Atoms can (and do) bond constantly; it's how they form molecules. Sometimes, in an atomic tug-of-war, one atom pulls electrons from another, forming an ionic bond. Atoms can also play nicely and share electrons in a covalent bond. From simple oxygen to complex human chromosome 13, George Zaidan and Charles Morton break down the humble chemical bond. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Bevan Lynch.
Views: 425037 TED-Ed
√ Bonding in carbon compounds | Energy | Chemistry
 
14:20
#iitutor #Chemistry #Energy https://www.iitutor.com/ In organic compounds carbon atoms almost always form four bonds. This suggests that the carbon atom’s four valence electrons are all involved in bonding. An examination of simple carbon-base molecules like methane (CH4) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) indicates that in these compounds the carbon atom forms four identical single covalent bonds and that the angles between the bonds are 109.5 . It can be predicted from the valence shell electron pair is required to minimise the electrostatic repulsion between them. The central role of carbon in organic chemistry depends on the fact carbon atoms can form chains of virtually unlimited length containing a succession of carbon-carbons bonds. The valence electrons not involved in forming carbon-carbon bonds are used in forming bonds with atoms of other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and halogens. The properties of carbon that allow it to form a huge number and variety of compounds include: • four outer shell valence electrons • can form single, double and triple bonds • can form chains and rings, which can be branched or unbranched • can share electrons with other non-metals Carbon atoms can bond to one another by single, double or triple covalent bonds. Lewis electron-dot diagrams do not show the spatial distribution of bonds in three dimensions. Carbon-carbon single bonds Single covalent bonds around a carbon atom are arranged tetrahedrally (bond angle=109.28 ). Methane is a good example of this arrangement of carbon-hydrogen single bonds. The two simplest molecules containing carbon-carbon single bonds are ethane (CH3CH3) and propane (CH 3CH2CH3). In these compounds each carbon atom forms four single bonds which again have a tetrahedral orientation. In the case of CH3CH3 three of the bonds formed by the carbon atoms are C-H bonds, while the other bond is a C-C bond. The length of the single C-C bond in these compounds has been found to be 0.154 nm. Carbon-carbon double bonds The compound ethene (CH2CH2) is the simplest carbon compound containing a C=C double bond. In this case only two of each carbon atom's four valence electrons are used in bonding with hydrogen atoms. Hence each carbon atom shares two pairs of electrons with another carbon atom. These two pairs of electrons constitute a double bond. The presence of one double covalent bond forces the bonding electrons into a planar arrangement (bond angle=120 ), so the structure of ethane (ethylene) is planar. An examination of compounds such as ethene (CH2CH2 ) indicates that the C=C bond length is 0.134 nm, the bond angles are 120°, and the geometric arrangement of the two carbon atoms and adjoining hydrogen atoms is planar. This again can be explained in terms of the VSEPR theory. In using the VSEPR theory the C=C double bond is viewed as a single region of charge. To minimise electron repulsion the three electron regions around each carbon atom adopt a planar orientation with bond angles of 120°.
Views: 6037 iitutor.com
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
13:22
Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2362035 Khan Academy
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
03:33
Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 296392 Professor Dave Explains
Chemical Bonds
 
03:45
This clip provides an overview of chemical bonds, explaining that a chemical bond is not a physical structure but an energy relationship that involves interactions between the electrons of the reacting atoms. The clip also discusses the various types of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent and hydrogen).
Views: 2773 INTELECOM
Covalent Bond Energy Example
 
04:23
Example solution to a Covalent Bond Energy problem from the covalent bond energy problem set form SciencePrimer.com. The problem set can be viewed at http://www.scienceprimer.com/covalent-bond-energy-qs
Views: 1873 SciencePrimer
Lattice Energy of Ionic Compounds, Basic Introduction, Charge vs Ionic Radius
 
13:30
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the lattice energy of ionic compounds. Lattice energy is the amount of energy released when 1 mole of gaseous ions combined to form a solid ionic compound. This video discusses the factors that affect the lattice energy of a compound. These factors are charge and ionic radius. The lattice energy of a compound is directly proportional to the charges of the ions and inversely related to ionic radii. This video explains how to use these two factors to determine which ionic compound has the most exothermic lattice energy values. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
GCSE Science Chemistry (9-1) Bond Energy Calculations
 
04:01
Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at how to calculate the energy change for a reaction from bond energies.
Views: 121093 Freesciencelessons
01 Why Do Bonds Form?
 
07:51
The formation of bonds is explained in terms of changes in chemical potential energy as the distance between atoms changes. Forces of attraction and repulsion are referred to. Learners are reminded why noble gases do not form bonds.
Views: 1412 Mindset Learn
11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE |
 
32:14
For PDF Notes and best Assignments visit @ http://physicswallahalakhpandey.com/ To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 01| Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding | https://youtu.be/daPAcFFSFdY 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE https://youtu.be/OqdNZTHxPxM 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE | https://youtu.be/ch9HorGagHE 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 04 || Fazan's RULE || Covalent Character in Ionic Compounds | https://youtu.be/d3iFlT8SlvA 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 05 || Lewis Dot Structure || How to draw Lewis Dot Structure Of || https://youtu.be/8-Qs1mnoJ2M 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 06 || Valence Bond Theory VBT || Difference between sigma and Pi Bond https://youtu.be/8B__xDUKqbM 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 07 | Pi Bond | P Pi - D Pi | P Pi - P Pi | IIT JEE NEET Pi Bond https://youtu.be/IrX7AcU07To Chemical Bonding 08 | Hybridisation | How to Find Hybridisation | Hybridisation of Atom IIT JEE NEET https://youtu.be/AvhUUY8yD08 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 09 | VSEPR theory | Shapes of Molecules | Geometry , Hybridisation ,etc https://youtu.be/x2-nP7i6T34 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 10 | Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part I Introduction | https://youtu.be/TQEhLXkNdmo Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 11 || Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part II || https://youtu.be/XCwMrnVvSTU Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule https://youtu.be/4KDkldXTj6w 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 13 || Bond Angle || Tricks For Bond Angle IIT JEE NEET || BOND ANGLE https://youtu.be/AjWwHkAlPSo 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 14 || Dragos Rule || Bond Angle Dragos Rule IIT JEE ADVANCE / NEET https://youtu.be/GfKmguqX-2g 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 15 || Vanderwaal Forces || IIT JEE NEET || London Forces , etc || https://youtu.be/664YicsoYkg 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET || https://youtu.be/k8tYXDKb2yE
Enthalpy: Crash Course Chemistry #18
 
11:24
Energy is like the bestest best friend ever and yet, most of the time we take it for granted. Hank feels bad for our friend and wants us to learn more about it so that we can understand what it's trying to tell us - like that any bond between two atoms contains energy. How much energy? That's not the simplest question to answer, but today Hank will answer it (kinda), by teaching us about a nifty little thing called enthalpy. If you are paying attention to this episode you'll learn what the state function is, and how it varies from a path-dependent function; why enthalpy change is different from heat; that bonds are energy and to form and break them they release and absorb heat to and from their environment. You'll get the quickest introduction to calorimetry ever (more on that in upcoming episodes) and learn the power of Hess's Law and how to use Germain Hess's concept of the standard enthalpy of formation to calculate exactly how much heat is produced by any chemical reaction. So much to learn! Let's get started! -- Table of Contents State Function 1:50 Path-Dependent Function 1:15 Enthalpy 2:58 Bonds are Energy 5:10 Colorimetry 5:36 Hess' Law 6:19 Standard Enthalpy of Formation 7:24 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1712091 CrashCourse
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
04:18
In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 6447 Whats Up Dude
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
02:48
In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 108989 Whats Up Dude
Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule
 
01:04:57
For PDF Notes and best Assignments visit @ http://physicswallahalakhpandey.com/ To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 01| Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding | https://youtu.be/daPAcFFSFdY 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE https://youtu.be/OqdNZTHxPxM 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE | https://youtu.be/ch9HorGagHE 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 04 || Fazan's RULE || Covalent Character in Ionic Compounds | https://youtu.be/d3iFlT8SlvA 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 05 || Lewis Dot Structure || How to draw Lewis Dot Structure Of || https://youtu.be/8-Qs1mnoJ2M 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 06 || Valence Bond Theory VBT || Difference between sigma and Pi Bond https://youtu.be/8B__xDUKqbM 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 07 | Pi Bond | P Pi - D Pi | P Pi - P Pi | IIT JEE NEET Pi Bond https://youtu.be/IrX7AcU07To Chemical Bonding 08 | Hybridisation | How to Find Hybridisation | Hybridisation of Atom IIT JEE NEET https://youtu.be/AvhUUY8yD08 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 09 | VSEPR theory | Shapes of Molecules | Geometry , Hybridisation ,etc https://youtu.be/x2-nP7i6T34 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 10 | Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part I Introduction | https://youtu.be/TQEhLXkNdmo Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 11 || Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part II || https://youtu.be/XCwMrnVvSTU Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule https://youtu.be/4KDkldXTj6w 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 13 || Bond Angle || Tricks For Bond Angle IIT JEE NEET || BOND ANGLE https://youtu.be/AjWwHkAlPSo 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 14 || Dragos Rule || Bond Angle Dragos Rule IIT JEE ADVANCE / NEET https://youtu.be/GfKmguqX-2g 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 15 || Vanderwaal Forces || IIT JEE NEET || London Forces , etc || https://youtu.be/664YicsoYkg 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET || https://youtu.be/k8tYXDKb2yE
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
08:50
There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 45450 Socratica
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
17:51
This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 155297 AtomicSchool
Valence Bond Theory, Hybrid Orbitals, and Molecular Orbital Theory
 
07:54
Attention! This video about molecular orbitals is much better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2k61JMk71M Alright, let's be real. Nobody understands molecular orbitals when they first take chemistry. You just pretend you do, and then in your next course you learn them a little better. And then a little better than that. And five years later you sort of understand them. So don't get discouraged! Just watch this for a head start and do your best. To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 613410 Professor Dave Explains
Sigma and Pi Bonds Explained, Basic Introduction, Chemistry
 
06:17
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into sigma and pi bonds. It explains how to calculate the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule given its lewis structure. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
11:38
Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1548249 CrashCourse
Ionic Bonding Part 2
 
10:18
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll look at the details of ionic bonding, using sodium chloride as an example. Both atoms have unfilled valence shells, which are the outermost energy level. Electrons are transferred from the metal to the nonmetal, creating ions with an opposite charge. The atoms are then held together because of the attraction between the opposite charges.
Views: 469318 Tyler DeWitt
11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE
 
34:20
For PDF Notes and best Assignments visit @ http://physicswallahalakhpandey.com/ To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 01| Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding | https://youtu.be/daPAcFFSFdY 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE https://youtu.be/OqdNZTHxPxM 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE | https://youtu.be/ch9HorGagHE 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 04 || Fazan's RULE || Covalent Character in Ionic Compounds | https://youtu.be/d3iFlT8SlvA 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 05 || Lewis Dot Structure || How to draw Lewis Dot Structure Of || https://youtu.be/8-Qs1mnoJ2M 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 06 || Valence Bond Theory VBT || Difference between sigma and Pi Bond https://youtu.be/8B__xDUKqbM 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 07 | Pi Bond | P Pi - D Pi | P Pi - P Pi | IIT JEE NEET Pi Bond https://youtu.be/IrX7AcU07To Chemical Bonding 08 | Hybridisation | How to Find Hybridisation | Hybridisation of Atom IIT JEE NEET https://youtu.be/AvhUUY8yD08 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 09 | VSEPR theory | Shapes of Molecules | Geometry , Hybridisation ,etc https://youtu.be/x2-nP7i6T34 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 10 | Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part I Introduction | https://youtu.be/TQEhLXkNdmo Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 11 || Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part II || https://youtu.be/XCwMrnVvSTU Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule https://youtu.be/4KDkldXTj6w 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 13 || Bond Angle || Tricks For Bond Angle IIT JEE NEET || BOND ANGLE https://youtu.be/AjWwHkAlPSo 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 14 || Dragos Rule || Bond Angle Dragos Rule IIT JEE ADVANCE / NEET https://youtu.be/GfKmguqX-2g 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 15 || Vanderwaal Forces || IIT JEE NEET || London Forces , etc || https://youtu.be/664YicsoYkg 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET || https://youtu.be/k8tYXDKb2yE
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
01:02:51
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
The Octet Rule: Help, Definition, and Exceptions
 
04:45
The Octet Rule is a general rule that is used to describe chemical bonding and draw Lewis Structures. The rule states that Main Group elements form bonds in a manner that results in each atom having eight valence electrons in the highest energy level (sometimes called outer shell). This results in each atom having the same electronic configuration as a noble gas. For a complete tutorial drawing Lewis Structures, watch my video: https://youtu.be/1ZlnzyHahvo The Octet Rule doesn’t work all the time and there are many exceptions. Hydrogen is one of the most notable exceptions and only needs two electrons to fill its outer shell. There are numerous other exceptions including expanded octets which can have up to twelve valence electrons. Even with the exceptions, the Octet Rule is a valuable rule of thumb that helps scientists predict how atoms will bond to form compounds. These predictions are often what is ultimately unobserved in the lab. Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 100536 Wayne Breslyn
Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals, Sigma and Pi Bonds, Sp Sp2 Sp3, Organic Chemistry, Bonding
 
36:31
This organic chemistry video tutorial explains the hybridization of atomic orbitals. It discusses how to determine the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule as well determining if a carbon is sp, sp2, or sp3 hybridized. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Valence Bond Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UP4LhDhoUE Molecular Orbital Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P21OjJ9lDcs Orbitals, Atomic Energy Levels, & Sublevels Explained! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sLXUr2HWIs How To Receive Tutoring and Get Paid At The Same Time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8A8JTpOWCQ Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Excel For Beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK-uNYuvcag Here is a list of topics: 1. Atomic Orbitals - S, px, py, and pz orbitals 2. Hybrid Orbitals vs Unhybridized Orbitals 3. Sp, Sp2, and SP3 hybridized Orbitals 4. S character vs P Character 5. Bond Strength of Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 6. Bond Length of Triple Bonds and Single Bonds 7. Sigma Bonds vs Pi Bonds 8. More Examples on Structure and Bonding 9. Electron Configuration of Carbon and Valence Bond Theory 10. Electron Configuration of Hybrid Orbitals - sp sp2 and sp3 11. dsp3 and d2sp3 hybridization 12. Hybridization of Lone pairs - Localized vs Delocalized Electrons 13. Hybridization of Lone pairs in resonance structures 14. Sigma and Pi Bonds In Single, Double, and Triple Bonds 15. Sigma Bonds and Overlap of Atomic Orbitals 16. Mixing Atomic Orbitals to form Hybrid Orbitals 17. Unhybridized P orbitals and pi bonding 18. Structure of Ethane With Hybrid Orbitals 19 Ethene or Ethylene Hybridization and Atomic Orbitals 20. Molecular Orbital Theory 21. Structure & Bonding of Ethyne or Acetylene - sigma and pi bonds 22. valence bond theory
√√ Energy and Bonds | Chemical Earth | Chemistry
 
15:54
https://www.iitutor.com Heat, light and electricity are common forms of energy that may be released or absorbed during various decomposition or synthesis reactions. Photolysis is decomposition of a compound using light energy. Electrolysis is decomposition of a compound using electrical energy. When heat is evolved in a chemical change the reaction is said to be exothermic. Synthesis of water. When hydrogen is ignited in oxygen there is an explosion and heat and some sound energy is produced. Water is the chemical product that forms. Combustion of fuels, such as methane and ethanol. When heat is absorbed in a chemical change the reaction is said to be endothermic. Decomposition of mercury oxide. When red mercury oxide is heated it breaks down into silver beads of mercury and oxygen gas is evolved. Decomposition of metal carbonates, e.g. etc. Combustion of magnesium. When magnesium burns in oxygen a bright, white light and considerable heat energy are released. A white powder is produced. This is magnesium oxide. Photolysis of silver bromide. Silver bromide crystals are photosensitive. They are decomposed by light (particularly ultraviolet light) to form silver metal and bromine. Electrolysis of molten sodium chloride. When sodium chloride (m.p. ) is melted and electrolysed at inert platinum electrodes, the sodium ions gain electrons to form sodium metal.
Views: 17 iitutor.com
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
07:21
Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 144911 AtomicSchool
Ionic Bonding
 
03:05
Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/physical-chemistry/ionic-bonding.html Ionic Bonding An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond that involves a metal and a nonmetal ion (or polyatomic ions such as ammonium) through electrostatic attraction. In short, it is a bond formed by the attraction between two oppositely charged ions. The metal donates one or more electrons, forming a positively charged ion or cation with a stable electron configuration. These electrons then enter the non metal, causing it to form a negatively charged ion or anion which also has a stable electron configuration. The electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged ions causes them to come together and form a bond. For example, common table salt is sodium chloride. When sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) are combined, the sodium atoms each lose an electron, forming a cation (Na+), and the chlorine atoms each gain an electron to form an anion (Cl−). These ions are then attracted to each other in a 1:1 ratio to form sodium chloride (NaCl). Na + Cl → Na+ + Cl− → NaCl Electron configurations of lithium and fluorine. Lithium has one electron in its outer shell, held rather loosely because the ionization energy is low. Fluorine carries 7 electrons in its outer shell. When one electron moves from lithium to fluorine, each ion acquires the noble gas configuration. The bonding energy from the electrostatic attraction of the two oppositely-charged ions has a large enough negative value that the overall bonded state energy is lower than the unbonded state The removal of electrons from the atoms is endothermic and causes the ions to have a higher energy. There may also be energy changes associated with breaking of existing bonds or the addition of more than one electron to form anions. However, the attraction of the ions to each other lowers their energy. Ionic bonding will occur only if the overall energy change for the reaction is favourable when the bonded atoms have a lower energy than the free ones. The larger the resulting energy change the stronger the bond. The low electronegativity of metals and high electronegativity of non-metals means that the energy change of the reaction is most favorable when metals lose electrons and non-metals gain electrons. Pure ionic bonding is not known to exist. All ionic compounds have a degree of covalent bonding. The larger the difference in electronegativity between two atoms, the more ionic the bond. Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten or in solution. They generally have a high melting point and tend to be soluble in water. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/
Views: 16962 TutorVista
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
01:58
Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1248530 kosasihiskandarsjah
Orbitals: Crash Course Chemistry #25
 
10:52
In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses what Molecules actually look like and why, some quantum-mechanical three dimensional wave functions are explored, he touches on hybridization, and delves into sigma and pi bonds. -- Table of Contents Molecules: Clumpy Globs... 0:18 Quantum-Mechanical Three-Dimensional Wave Functions 3:06 S & P Orbital Hybridization 5:27 Sigma & Pi Bonds 7:32 Hybridized Orbitals 5:52 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1917453 CrashCourse
Lewis Structures, Introduction, Formal Charge, Molecular Geometry, Resonance, Polar or Nonpolar
 
02:13:38
This chemistry video tutorial explains how to draw lewis structures of molecules and the lewis dot diagram of polyatomic ions. It shows you how to calculate the formal charge, how to draw the resonance form of the lewis structure and how to determine the hybridization of the central atom. It also discusses molecular geometry / vsepr and the bond angles that are found in common molecules as well as if the molecule is polar or nonpolar. This video contains plenty of formulas, notes, examples, and practice problems that will help you on your next worksheet assignment or upcoming quiz. This video contains all the answers / solutions to the problems posted. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Here is a list of topics: 1. How to draw the Lewis structure of a molecule or compound 2. Valence Electrons of Common Elements - Boron, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine 3. Number of Bonds Elements Prefer to Form 4. Lone Pairs, Bonding Electrons, and Nonbonding Electrons 5. Octet Rule - Expanded Octet vs Incomplete Octet 6. Lewis Dot Structure of Diatomic Molecules / Elements - F2, O2, N2, and H2 7. Lewis Dot Diagram - BH3 - Incomplete Octet 8. Molecular Geometry of BH3 - Trigonal Planar - Bond Angle 120 Degrees 9. Formal Charge Calculations - Equation / Formula 10. Formal Charge = Valence Electrons - (Bonds + Dots) 11. How to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar 12. Polar vs Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Electronegativity Difference 13. Lewis Structures of H2O, H3O+, and OH- With Formal Charge Calculation 14. Why is CO2 Nonpolar When CO is Polar 15. Lewis Structure For CO2 and CO 16. CO2 - Linear Molecular Geometry, 180 Bond Angle 17. Hybridization - s, sp, sp2, sp3, dsp3 or sp3d, d^2sp3 or sp3d2 18. Lewis Structure For CH4 - Tetrahedral Molecular Geometry - Bond Angle of 109.5 Plus Hybridization 19. Lewis Dot Structure For NH3 - Trigonal Pyramidal - Bond Angle of 107, Sp3 Hybridized. 20. Lewis Structure For H2S - Bent Molecular Geometry and Tetrahedral Electron Pair Geometry 21. Molecular Geometry vs Electron Pair Geometry 22. Lewis Structure For SF6 - Octahedral Molecular Geometry, 90 Bond Angle, Sp3d2 Hybridized, Nonpolar 23. Lewis Structure For PCl5 - Polar or Nonpolar? 24. Lewis Structure For SF4, I3-, XeF4, IF5 - Multiple of 8 technique 25. How To Determine The Number of Lone Pairs on the Central Element 26. Lewis Structure For SOF2, POCl3, SO2Cl2, XeOF2 - Multiple Elements in a molecule - How to determine which element goes in the middle 27. Lewis Dot Diagrams With Resonance - CO3 2-, NO2-, BF3, and NO3- Lewis Structure 28. Polyatomic Ions - Lewis Structure For SO4 2-, PO4 3-, ClO4-, ClO3-, ClO2-, and ClO- 29. Lewis Structures With Radicals - Odd Number of Electrons - NO2 and NO Lewis Structure 30. Lewis Structures - Organic Molecules - Organic Chemistry - Functional Groups 31. Lewis Structure For C2H6 Ethane, C2H4 Ethene, C2H2 Acetylene or Ethyne - Alkanes, Alkenes, and Alkynes 32. Lewis Structure For CH3OH - Methanol - Alcohol Functional Group 33. Lewis Structure For CH3CHO - Ethanal - Aldehyde / Carbonyl 34. Lewis Structure For CH3COOH - Ethanoic Acid or Acetic Acid Found In Vinegar - Carboxylic Acid Functional Group 35. CH3COCH3 Lewis Structure - Acetone or Propanone - Ketone 36. Lewis Structure For CH3OCH3 - Dimethyl Ether 37. Lewis Structure For CH3CO2CH3 - Ester 38. Lewis Structure For CH3CH2NH2 - Ethyl Amine 39. Lewis Structure For CH3CONH2 - Ethanamide - Amide Functional Group 40. Lewis Structure For CH3CN - Nitrile
Ionic Bond - Animated Presentation (CHEMICAL BONDING)
 
03:23
What is an Ionic Bond? ---- Ionic bonds are a type of chemical bond. An ionic bond is formed between metals (such as sodium, potassium and magnesium) and non-metals (such as oxygen, nitrogen and chlorine) or polyatomic ions (such as ammonium). The metal donates one or more electrons to the non-metal. This causes the metal to become positively charged (as it has lost at least one electron) and the non-metal to become negatively charges (as it has gained at least one electron). This attraction between the positive metal ions and the negative non-metal ions causes a bond (ionic bond) to be formed.An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond formed through an electrostatic attraction between two oppositely charged ions. Ionic bonds are formed between a cation, which is usually a metal, and an anion, which is usually a nonmetal. Pure ionic bonding cannot exist: all ionic compounds have some degree of covalent bonding. Thus, an ionic bond is considered a bond where the ionic character is greater than the covalent character. The larger the difference in electronegativity between the two atoms involved in the bond, the more ionic (polar) the bond is. Bonds with partially ionic and partially covalent character are called polar covalent bonds. Ionic bonding is a form of noncovalent bonding.Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten or in solution, but not as a solid. They generally have a high melting point and tend to be soluble in water.The formation of an ionic bond proceeds when the cation, whose ionization energy is low, releases some of its electrons to achieve a stable electron configuration. The anion, whose electron affinity is positive, then accepts the electrons, again to attain a stable electron configuration. Typically, the stable electron configuration is one of the noble gases for elements in the s-block and the p-block, and particular stable electron configurations for d-block and f-block elements. The electrostatic attraction between these two entities forms the ionic bond.For example, common table salt is sodium chloride. When sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) are combined, the sodium atoms each lose an electron, forming cations (Na+), and the chlorine atoms each gain an electron to form anions (Cl−). These ions are then attracted to each other in a 1:1 ratio to form sodium chloride (NaCl). Na + Cl → Na+ + Cl− → NaCl Representation of ionic bonding between lithium and fluorine to form lithium fluoride. Lithium has a low ionization energy and readily gives up its lone valence electron to the fluorine atom, which has a positive electron affinity and accepts the electron that was donated by the lithium atom. The end result is that lithium is isoelectronic with helium and fluorine is isoelectronic with neon. Electrostatic interaction between the two atoms forms an ionic bond. The removal of electrons from the cation is endothermic, raising the system's overall energy. There may also be energy changes associated with breaking of existing bonds or the addition of more than one electron to form anions. However, the action of the anion accepting the cation's valence electrons and the subsequent attraction of the ions to each other releases energy and thus lowers the overall energy of the system.Ionic bonding will occur only if the overall energy change for the reaction is favourable -- when the reaction is exothermic. The larger the resulting energy change, the stronger the bond. The low electronegativity of metals and high electronegativity of non-metals means that the reaction is most favourable between a metal and a non-metal.
Views: 37112 Animation Devastation
GCSE Science Chemistry (9-1) Ionic Bonding 1
 
04:24
Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ This video is for the new GCSE specifications (levels 1-9) for all exam boards. In this video, we start exploring ionic bonding by looking at what happens when group 1 elements such as lithium react with group 7 elements such as fluorine. We explore a typical exam question on this topic.
Views: 212998 Freesciencelessons
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
03:54
Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Atomic structure And Chemical Bonding
 
07:00
Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/inorganic-chemistry/atomic-structure.html Atomic Structure To review, an atom consists of a small, dense nucleus containing all of its protons and neutrons, surrounded by electrons that fill the remaining volume of the atom. The atom stays electrically neutral because the number of protons and electrons are usually equal. In this section, the structure of atoms and the chemical properties will be studied, and the number of electrons and the way they are distributed generally determine them. Chemical Bonding: Introduction Atoms of almost every element has the ability to combine with other atoms to form more complex structures. The forces of attraction that bind them together are chemical bonds. To understand chemistry, the nature and origin of chemical bonds is important, since the basis of chemical reactions is the forming and the breaking of bonds and the changes in bonding forces. There are two main classes of bonding forces: covalent bonds and ionic bonds. Covalent bonding deals with the sharing of electrons between atoms. Ionic bonding deals with the transfer of electrons between atoms. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/
Views: 27296 TutorVista