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Electronegativity and bonding | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Electronegativity differences in bonding using Pauling scale. Using differences in electronegativity to classify bonds as covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Is it an Ionic, Covalent or Polar Covalent Bond?
 
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How to tell if a bond is Ionic, Covalent or Polar Covalent. You have to calculate the difference in electronegativities between the atoms ... the difference tell you which you have!
Views: 216270 chemistNATE
The Chemical Bond: Covalent vs. Ionic and Polar vs. Nonpolar
 
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Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, James Bond, so many bonds! What dictates which kind of bond will form? Electronegativity values, of course. Let's go through each type and what they're all about. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 211751 Professor Dave Explains
Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds
 
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This video is Awesome! Understand Bonding Like Never Before. Polar Covalent, Nonpolar Covalent & Ionic Bonds - This video shows how to determine the type of bond that will form based on electronegativity values. The difference in electronegativity values result in the bond being ionic, non polar covalent or polar covalent. Ionic bonds result from the transfer of electrons, polar covalent from the uneven sharing of electrons and non polar covalent bonds from the even sharing of electrons. Tune in for the video on Polar Molecules.
Views: 127841 sciencepost
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2184249 CrashCourse
Electronegativity | Chemistry of life | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Defines electronegativity and compares to electron affinity. Explains group and period trends in electronegativity using atomic radii. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/electronegativity-and-chemical-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/ionic-covalent-and-metallic-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 678814 Khan Academy
Ionic Bonds, Polar Covalent Bonds, and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains how to identify a bond as an ionic bond, polar covalent bond, or a nonpolar covalent bond. Ionic bonds usually consist of metals and nonmetals where as covalent bonds consists of nonmetals. In a nonpolar covalent bond, electrons are shared equally and the electronegativity difference between the two atoms is 0.4 or less. For polar covalent bonds, the electrons are shared unequally between the two atoms and the electronegativity difference is defined to be 0.5 or more. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
4.1 Electronegativity and bonding (SL)
 
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This video covers the relationship between the difference in electronegativity between atoms and the type of bonding. Understandings: Bond polarity results from the difference in electronegativities of the bonded atoms.
Views: 11196 Mike Sugiyama Jones
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 39622 Socratica
Bond Polarity, Electronegativity and Dipole Moment - Chemistry Practice Problems
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into bond polarity, electronegativity, and the dipole moment of a bond. It explains how to indicate the polarity of a bond and of a molecule using electronegativity and it discusses how to draw the dipole moment of a bond. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Electronegativity and Bond Polarity - Chemistry Tutorial
 
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https://www.thechemistrysolution.com This chemistry tutorial covers bond polarity and electronegativity, and the general trend of electronegativity on the periodic table. This tutorial also includes examples determining the relative polarity of different bonds.
Views: 80189 TheChemistrySolution
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 950464 Tyler DeWitt
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1592785 CrashCourse
Using electronegativity to determine whether bonds are polar nonpolar or covalent.
 
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This is a video on how you use the differences in the electronegativity of the elements to identify a bond between two elements as polar covalent, nonpolar covalent or ionic. There is also a brief introduction to identifying polar molecules.
Views: 24 Anthony Tedaldi
06 Electronegativity Difference and Bond Polarity
 
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Pauling’s electronegativity scale is introduced. Learners are shown how the difference in electronegativity between two bonded nuclei determines the degree of polarity of the bond between them.
Views: 635 Mindset Learn
Identifying Bond Polarity from Difference in Electronegativity - Mini-Lecture
 
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A mini-lecture on identifying whether a bond is non-polar covalent, polar covalent, or ionic.
Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Clear & Simple
 
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NEW & IMPROVED VIDEO LINK - I've improved this video, check it out (http://youtu.be/4SjSKjmO38c). Determining the Type of Bond Based On Electronegativity. Polar, Nonpolar or Ionic Bonds. This is meant to be an introduction to molecular polarity. Higher order polar covalent molecules are not discussed. Clear & Simple Chemistry Explanation.
Views: 287543 sciencepost
Identifying ionic and covalent bonds plus experiments for f
 
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Video by Daniela Rangel, Jocelyn Diez and destiny Lumbreras, for mr Jackson's 3rd period chem class
Views: 27007 Cshm chemistry 35
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2225351 Khan Academy
Electronegativity and Determining Bond Type
 
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The difference between ionic, nonpolar covalent and polar covalent bonds
Views: 3692 LHSAtkins
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 600248 Bozeman Science
Ionic Bond | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1058016 It's AumSum Time
Introduction to Ionic Bonding and Covalent Bonding
 
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This crash course chemistry video tutorial explains the main concepts between ionic bonds found in ionic compounds and polar & nonpolar covalent bonding found in molecular compounds. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Ionic Bonds - Transfer of Valence Electrons 2. Electrostatic Force of Attraction In Ionic Bonding 3. Ionic Compounds - Metals and Nonmetals 4. Molecular Compounds - 2 or More Nonmetals 5. Polar Covalent Bonding - Unequal Sharing of Electrons 6. Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Equal Sharing of Electrons 7. Polarized Compounds - Dipole Moment and Charge Separation 8. Electronegativity and Charge Distribution 9. Metal Cations vs Nonmetal Anions
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 29698 Socratica
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: How To Tell If a Molecule is Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This video provides a fast way for you to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar. It provides examples so you can quickly distinguish nonpolar molecules from those that are polar. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of molecules that are classified as polar or nonpolar: N2, O2, Cl2, F2, H2 He, Ne, Ar, Xe CH4, C2H6, CH2=CH2, CF4, SBr6, BH3, CO2, PCl5, H2O, NH3, HF, CH3OH, CH3NH2, CH3COOH OCS, CH3F, SO2
⚗️ Classifying Bonds as Pure Covalent, Polar Covalent, or Ionic using Electronegativities
 
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✔ https://StudyForce.com ✔ https://Biology-Forums.com ✔ Ask questions here: https://Biology-Forums.com/index.php?board=33.0 Follow us: ▶ Facebook: https://facebook.com/StudyForcePS/ ▶ Instagram: https://instagram.com/studyforceonline/ ▶ Twitter: https://twitter.com/studyforceps Pure covalent bonds are those in which electrons are shared equally between the two atoms involved. This can only happen for pairs of identical atoms. In a polar covalent bond, the electrons shared by the atoms spend a greater amount of time, on the average, closer to the nucleus of one atom over the other. An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond that involves a metal and a nonmetal ion (or polyatomic ions such as ammonium) through electrostatic attraction. In short, it is a bond formed by the attraction between two oppositely charged ions. Q1. Classify the bond formed between each pair of atoms as covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. (a) Sr and F (b) N and Cl (c) N and O Q2. Classify the bond formed between each pair of atoms as pure covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. (a) I and I (b) Cs and Br (c) P and O (a) From Figure 9.7, find the electronegativities of Sr (1.0) and of F (4.0). The electronegativity difference is ΔEN = 4.0 − 1.0 = 3.0. Using Table 9.1, classify this bond as ionic. (b) From Figure 9.7, find the electronegativities of N (3.0) and of Cl (3.0). The electronegativity difference (ΔEN) is ΔEN = 3.0 − 3.0 = 0. Using Table 9.1, classify this bond as covalent. (c) From Figure 9.7, find the electronegativities of N (3.0) and of O (3.5). The electronegativity difference (ΔEN) is ΔEN = 3.5 − 3.0 = 0.5. Using Table 9.1, classify this bond as polar covalent.
Views: 23 Study Force
Ionic Bonding
 
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Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/physical-chemistry/ionic-bonding.html Ionic Bonding An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond that involves a metal and a nonmetal ion (or polyatomic ions such as ammonium) through electrostatic attraction. In short, it is a bond formed by the attraction between two oppositely charged ions. The metal donates one or more electrons, forming a positively charged ion or cation with a stable electron configuration. These electrons then enter the non metal, causing it to form a negatively charged ion or anion which also has a stable electron configuration. The electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged ions causes them to come together and form a bond. For example, common table salt is sodium chloride. When sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) are combined, the sodium atoms each lose an electron, forming a cation (Na+), and the chlorine atoms each gain an electron to form an anion (Cl−). These ions are then attracted to each other in a 1:1 ratio to form sodium chloride (NaCl). Na + Cl → Na+ + Cl− → NaCl Electron configurations of lithium and fluorine. Lithium has one electron in its outer shell, held rather loosely because the ionization energy is low. Fluorine carries 7 electrons in its outer shell. When one electron moves from lithium to fluorine, each ion acquires the noble gas configuration. The bonding energy from the electrostatic attraction of the two oppositely-charged ions has a large enough negative value that the overall bonded state energy is lower than the unbonded state The removal of electrons from the atoms is endothermic and causes the ions to have a higher energy. There may also be energy changes associated with breaking of existing bonds or the addition of more than one electron to form anions. However, the attraction of the ions to each other lowers their energy. Ionic bonding will occur only if the overall energy change for the reaction is favourable when the bonded atoms have a lower energy than the free ones. The larger the resulting energy change the stronger the bond. The low electronegativity of metals and high electronegativity of non-metals means that the energy change of the reaction is most favorable when metals lose electrons and non-metals gain electrons. Pure ionic bonding is not known to exist. All ionic compounds have a degree of covalent bonding. The larger the difference in electronegativity between two atoms, the more ionic the bond. Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten or in solution. They generally have a high melting point and tend to be soluble in water. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/
Views: 16860 TutorVista
Percentage Ionic Character
 
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Helios Educore Pvt. Ltd. Sunshine Business Park, Plot - 5A, Sector-94, Noida (UP) INDIA-201301 Chemistry Video Lectures to prepare for JEE-Main, JEE-Advanced, NEET & and Board Exams. visit us : www.helioseducore.com Email : [email protected] Mob. : 08010000068 For Purchase : http://helioseducore.com/product-category/buy-book/ or Amazon Search Er Dushyant Kumar
Polar Covalent Bonds
 
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Polar covalent bonds result from eneven sharing of electrons. Learn how to predict if a bond will be polar or nonpolar in this video.
Views: 138148 The Science Classroom
Electronegativity | Detail Concept and Tricks | Explained by IITian | Jee Mains, Advance | NEET
 
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Hello Guys, Today we are going to discuss a very important topic for IIT jee Mains, Advance, NEET and AIIMS from Periodic table, its all about Electronegativity. Basically, electronegativity refers to how hard the nucleus of an atom pulls on electrons in its orbit. By “bonding pair of electrons,” that just means that in a chemical bond between two atoms, be it ionic or covalent, the bonding atom with greater electronegativity will pull the shared electrons closer to itself. The fundamental reason behind this is that the positive nucleus attracts the negative electrons. The more positive charge in the nucleus, the greater the electronegativity. That’s only one part of the equation though. The other depends on how many shells the atom has. The more shells, the farther away from the positive nucleus the outermost electrons will be, and thus the weaker the attraction. A highly electronegative atom will have an ideal combination of large positive charge and few shells. That’s why in the periodic table, the most electronegative atoms are to the top right. Going to the right of the table = more positive charge, and going up = fewer shells. Electronegativity is important cause the difference in electronegativity between two bonding atoms determines whether it is a covalent or ionic bonds. Covalent bonds have a small difference in electronegativity (less than 1.9), while ionic bonds have a large difference (greater than 1.9). Other Details on the topic has been deal in details inside the lecture. Hope it will be extremely helpful for aspirants. Thanks Team IITian explains ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Watch our other videos. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- First Point of Difference Rule | Organic Chemistry | Explained by IITian | Jee Mains, Advance | NEET https://youtu.be/URBmaMusB60 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Oxides of Phosphorus | Tricks and Techniques | IIT Jee Mains, Advance | BITSAT | NEET & AIIMS https://youtu.be/4miyRntMM_0 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Phosphine Gas | Tricks and Techniques | IIT Jee Mains, Advance | BITSAT | NEET, AIIMS https://youtu.be/NTsUz9UClC0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Potassium Permanganate | d Block Chemistry | Jee Mains, Advance | NEET | BITSAT and AIIMS https://youtu.be/O8d9w8aCzWc ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Neighbouring Group Participation | Tricks and Tech | IIT-Jee Mains, Advance | BITSAT | NEET & AIIMS https://youtu.be/52p9yk0STZw -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Carbocations and Carbanions | General Organic Chemistry | Explained by IITian | Jee Mains & Advance https://youtu.be/7EuX42pO8HQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tricks for Qualitative Analysis | Cations | Jee Mains, Advance, NEET, BITSAT and AIIMS https://youtu.be/3sOCGx5NC2o ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tricks to Remember p Block Reactions | Group 15 | Jee Mains, Advance, NEET, BITSAT & AIIMS https://youtu.be/GSxtE_nzkyE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Trick for Bond Angle | Developed by IITian | IIT Jee Mains, Advance, NEET, BITSAT & AIIMS https://youtu.be/tuXssF-FSNs ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Banana Bond in Chemistry | Explained by IITian | IIT Jee Mains, Advance, BITSAT, NEET and AIIMS https://youtu.be/vfLtcwstrtQ
Views: 8316 IITian explains
Lewis Theory V:  Quantifying Polarity of Chemical Bonds - Dipole Moment and Percent Ionic Character
 
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This video goes further in depth on the subject of bond polarity. While electronegativity differences are good for comparing relative polarities of different types of bonds (e.g. C-O vs C-N), the electronegativity scale is relative, not absolute. Dipole moment and percent ionic character are two absolute measures of bond polarity.
Views: 29980 Ben's Chem Videos
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 211286 RicochetScience
How Does Water Bond - Covalent Bonds | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about the covalent bonding of water, when learning about covalent bonding within properties of matter. Water is made from one oxygen atom and two hydrogens. The oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell, but it really wants to have 8 to have a full shell. The hydrogens have one outer shell electron, but want to have two. The atoms share their electrons, forming covalent bonds. So all three atoms have full outer shells, and create a water molecule. Water has two covalent bonds. In water, the bonding electrons spend most of their time nearer the oxygen atom, because it is more ELECTRONEGATIVE. This means that it is electron withdrawing. As the negatively charged electrons are nearer the oxygen atom, the oxygen atom becomes a little bit negative itself, while the hydrogens become a little positive. This is called delta positive and delta negative. Water doesn’t just have any old covalent bonds; it has what we call POLAR COVALENT bonds and is a POLAR molecule. This is really important as it affects how water behaves and reacts with other elements. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Ionic Bonding Part 3
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Here, we'll talk about electronegativity, and why some atoms steal electrons, while other atoms give them away. We will look at the 3D lattice structures that are formed during ionic bonding, and we'll have a quick introduction to writing chemical formulas and naming ionic compounds.
Views: 260204 Tyler DeWitt
Ionic Bond - Animated Presentation (CHEMICAL BONDING)
 
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What is an Ionic Bond? ---- Ionic bonds are a type of chemical bond. An ionic bond is formed between metals (such as sodium, potassium and magnesium) and non-metals (such as oxygen, nitrogen and chlorine) or polyatomic ions (such as ammonium). The metal donates one or more electrons to the non-metal. This causes the metal to become positively charged (as it has lost at least one electron) and the non-metal to become negatively charges (as it has gained at least one electron). This attraction between the positive metal ions and the negative non-metal ions causes a bond (ionic bond) to be formed.An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond formed through an electrostatic attraction between two oppositely charged ions. Ionic bonds are formed between a cation, which is usually a metal, and an anion, which is usually a nonmetal. Pure ionic bonding cannot exist: all ionic compounds have some degree of covalent bonding. Thus, an ionic bond is considered a bond where the ionic character is greater than the covalent character. The larger the difference in electronegativity between the two atoms involved in the bond, the more ionic (polar) the bond is. Bonds with partially ionic and partially covalent character are called polar covalent bonds. Ionic bonding is a form of noncovalent bonding.Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten or in solution, but not as a solid. They generally have a high melting point and tend to be soluble in water.The formation of an ionic bond proceeds when the cation, whose ionization energy is low, releases some of its electrons to achieve a stable electron configuration. The anion, whose electron affinity is positive, then accepts the electrons, again to attain a stable electron configuration. Typically, the stable electron configuration is one of the noble gases for elements in the s-block and the p-block, and particular stable electron configurations for d-block and f-block elements. The electrostatic attraction between these two entities forms the ionic bond.For example, common table salt is sodium chloride. When sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) are combined, the sodium atoms each lose an electron, forming cations (Na+), and the chlorine atoms each gain an electron to form anions (Cl−). These ions are then attracted to each other in a 1:1 ratio to form sodium chloride (NaCl). Na + Cl → Na+ + Cl− → NaCl Representation of ionic bonding between lithium and fluorine to form lithium fluoride. Lithium has a low ionization energy and readily gives up its lone valence electron to the fluorine atom, which has a positive electron affinity and accepts the electron that was donated by the lithium atom. The end result is that lithium is isoelectronic with helium and fluorine is isoelectronic with neon. Electrostatic interaction between the two atoms forms an ionic bond. The removal of electrons from the cation is endothermic, raising the system's overall energy. There may also be energy changes associated with breaking of existing bonds or the addition of more than one electron to form anions. However, the action of the anion accepting the cation's valence electrons and the subsequent attraction of the ions to each other releases energy and thus lowers the overall energy of the system.Ionic bonding will occur only if the overall energy change for the reaction is favourable -- when the reaction is exothermic. The larger the resulting energy change, the stronger the bond. The low electronegativity of metals and high electronegativity of non-metals means that the reaction is most favourable between a metal and a non-metal.
Views: 36407 Animation Devastation
Bond Polarity - Electronegativity 002
 
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Calculate the difference in electronegativity between the following two atoms: N-O Is this bond nonpolar, polar, or ionic?
[HIndi] Periodicity of Electronegativity
 
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In this video, Rakhi will explain what Electronegativity is and what are the various factors which affect the Electronegativity! Later, she discuss the periodic trends of Electronegativity observed across the periodic table. Besides that she explains the Pauling Scale used for measuring Electronegativity of various elements. In the end, she will also explain how the nature of bond between two elements depends upon the difference in their Electronegativity. The video also helps the viewer to understand formation of ionic bond, polar covalent bond or non-polar covalent bond. Happy Learning! Keep Watching Chemistory!! For regular updates, you may follow us on - Instagram: www.instagram.com/chemistory.in Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheChemistory Twitter: www.twitter.com/TheChemistory Visit: www.chemistory.in
Views: 30981 Chemistory
Teaching Covalent and Ionic Compounds - How to Identify Compounds Using the Periodic Table
 
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Are you students having trouble determining whether a compound is ionic or covalent? View this quick and easy strategy that students can utilize to learn the difference between the two. Of course, this is not taking into account differences in electronegativity. However, for the purposes of an on-level class, this strategy will suffice. Check out my Teaching Tips and Strategies Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dqM6Vdf-oQ&list=PLZ5iwaxhtmvIQhdsD3MGVxRwoPpFTRjvn __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/bwjnews Facebook @bondwithjames https://www.facebook.com/bondwithjames Instagram @bondwithjames https://www.instagram.com/bondwithjames Pinterest @bondwithjames https://www.pinterest.com/bondwithjames TeachersPayTeachers @bondwithjames https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/store/bond-with-james Business inquiries? [email protected] _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ In this video, James of Bond with James, shares a quick teaching tip that chemistry teachers may utilize in their classrooms to interactively help students recognize the difference between covalent compounds and ionic compounds using the periodic table. Some teachers prefer to teach ionic compounds separately from covalent compounds, while others prefer to teach them together. However, memorizing the rules for chemical nomenclature is like learning a new language in a short period of time - which often causes frustration for students, especially if they still have trouble recognizing the difference between covalent compounds and ionic compounds. James has found that using this simple strategy helps students quickly recognize the difference between ionic and covalent compounds. The strategy is short, simple, and interactive. It does not require a bunch of materials or time to show it to chemistry students.
Views: 3341 Bond with James
Ionic Bonding Part 2
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll look at the details of ionic bonding, using sodium chloride as an example. Both atoms have unfilled valence shells, which are the outermost energy level. Electrons are transferred from the metal to the nonmetal, creating ions with an opposite charge. The atoms are then held together because of the attraction between the opposite charges.
Views: 436965 Tyler DeWitt
Polar bonds and electronegativity
 
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Short description of degree of polarity of a bond based on difference in electronegativity values.
Views: 9295 ChemistryUTAustin
Chemical Bonding Part 7 Electronegativity and Bond Polarity
 
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This tutorial tackles the topic of relating bond polarity to electronegativity values. While values may differ from source to source, the general concept remains that ionic bonds, polar covalent bonds and non-polar covalent bonds can be classified by taking the difference in electronegativity values. This video focuses on the rules for determining bond polarity, how one defines the character of a bond, and then views each bond type through the lens of electronegativity values. Worked examples are provided at the end.
Views: 45 Sarah English
Bond Polarity - Electronegativity 001
 
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Calculate the difference in electronegativity between the following two atoms: O-B Is this bond nonpolar, polar, or ionic?
The Periodic Table: Atomic Radius, Ionization Energy, and Electronegativity
 
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Why is the periodic table arranged the way it is? There are specific reasons, you know. Because of the way we organize the elements, there are special patterns that emerge. And you know how Professor Dave feels about patterns. He likes them. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 745583 Professor Dave Explains
Concept at your tips - Ionic and Covalent Bond - ( In Hindi ) - Easy and fast way to learn
 
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in this video you will learn easy and fast way to remember Ionic and covalent bond with a small trick. in this you will also learn what is anion and cation ? please channel ko subscribe karey https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIUatIgOsHrko9SNv_dQczw Please Like and follow us for more update Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/technikclass/ instagram: https://www.instagram.com/technikclasses/
Views: 14469 Technik Classes
[Hindi] Chemical Bonding Easy Explanation || Ionic Bond || covalent bond || Metallic bond
 
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HELLO GENIUS ...... IN THIS VIDEO WE LEARN ABOUT CHEMICAL BONDING BASICS HOW THEY DISCOVERED ,HOW THEY INTERACT WITH EACH OTHER, HOW MANY TYPES ARE THERE . IN THE VIDEO WE COVER THE BASIS OF THERE TYPES ALSO SO YOU CAN EASILY LEARN IT WITH THE SIMPLE EXPLANATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BE CURIOUS BE GENIUS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Thanks for watching
Views: 17657 uScientist
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1212585 kosasihiskandarsjah
Polar Covalent Bonding
 
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Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://chemistry.tutorvista.com/organic-chemistry/polar-covalent-bond.html Polar Covalent Bond The polar covalent bond, called a polar bond for short, is a variation on the standard covalent bond. It is defined by a difference in electronegativity values of 0.4 or greater, the meaning of which shall be made clear below. All covalent bonds are polar to some extent unless the bond is between two atoms of the same element. It is best to start with a review of the standard covalent bond. This is the sharing of electrons between two elements in order to have 8 electrons in the outer shell. The only exception to this is Hydrogen, which is stable with 2 electrons in its outer shell. The structure of each element gives it a different electronegativity value. This value is effectively the strength of the pull of that atom's nucleus on the electrons around it. The higher the value the greater the pull. A covalent bond is electrons moving around two atoms; they are being shared. It is the difference between the electronegativity values that determines which atom gets the larger share of the electron's time. If the electrons spend more of their time around one atom out of the pair then that region will have more negative charge than the other atom. Carbon to Carbon Bond The first example is the standard Carbon to Carbon bond such as occurs in the alkane molecules. We are just considering the bond that these two atoms share without regard for any other bonds that this pair of atoms may be involved in. First we can draw the two atoms as shown below. The pair of electrons that form the bond are drawn between them. The values written below the atoms are from the electronegativities table. The difference is calculated which in this case is zero. A polar covalent bond occurs every time Hydrogen bonds with Nitrogen, Oxygen or Fluorine as these are the three elements with the highest electronegativity values. They all have a difference of 0.9 or greater with Hydrogen. These bonds are called polar because of the different charges. These act like magnets and so polar molecules are pulled toward each other, with opposite charges attracting. The polar covalent bond is commonplace. Water is a liquid at room temperature because of these bonds. Ammonia (NH3) dissolves readily in water because of these bonds. This model even explains why water expands as it freezes. A polar covalent bond involving Hydrogen with any of the three most electronegative elements of Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine is especially strong and is called a Hydrogen bond. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
Views: 52575 TutorVista
Electronegativity differences explain Polar bonds in covalent compounds
 
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Polar bonds are the result of two atoms having a substantial difference in electronegativity values. Electronegativity is a measure of an atom's ability (strength) to pull bonding electrons towards itself. Fluorine is the most electronegative atom with a value of 4.0. If the electronegativity difference is greater than 0.4 or 0.5, the difference is enough to cause the bond to be "polar" or lopsided. This lopsided bond, or distorted electron density, causes the bond to behave similarly to a magnet (with a north pole & south pole). If the polar bonds to not cancel each other out, then the entire molecule will be polar, which has many implications in its solubility, its boiling point, etc.
Views: 2467 Michele Berkey

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