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Search results “Deferring taxes on investment income”
Deferred tax assets explained
 
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What are deferred tax assets? When and how do deferred tax assets occur, and how do you account for deferred tax assets? Which type of items create deferred tax assets? What is a Deferred Tax Asset impairment? All of this and more is covered in this short video. With a term like deferred tax assets, the first logical step to take is to look at the meaning of each of the words. Tax indicates that we are dealing with the topic of taxation. Deferred means that something has been postponed, and assets means that we own it, we have ownership. Keep that in mind when we explore deferred tax assets in more depth. Once you understand deferred tax assets, an important related topic is deferred tax liabilities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QKvzNV1Qw8 Philip de Vroe (The Finance Storyteller) aims to make strategy, finance and leadership enjoyable and easier to understand. Learn the business vocabulary to join the conversation with your CEO at your company. Understand how financial statements work in order to make better stock market investment decisions. Philip delivers training in various formats: YouTube videos, classroom sessions, webinars, and business simulations. Connect with me through Linked In!
Deferred Tax Assets in Financial Accounting
 
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This video shows what a deferred tax asset is in Financial Accounting. Deferred tax assets reduce taxes paid in future periods (they represent future tax savings). Deferred tax assets result from temporary differences between book and tax income. This video provides an example to illustrate how a deferred tax asset could arise and the journal entries that would be necessary to record the deferred tax asset. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin This video was funded by a Civic Engagement Fund grant from the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University in St. Louis.
Views: 68971 Edspira
Tax-Efficient Investing
 
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Being tax efficient with investments allows more money to be reinvested into a portfolio to grow over time. This video explains ways investments can be taxed and strategies for potentially minimizing tax burdens.
Views: 69268 TD Ameritrade
INVESTING TAXES EXPLAINED: Dividend Vs. Growth Investing
 
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By subscriber request, today's video is my guide to taxes explained for investors. Over my 20+ years investing, I have picked up a wealth of knowledge on the taxation of investments. While I'm not a licensed tax advisor and today's video is not tax advice, I wanted to share my personal thoughts on the topic for dividend investors and growth investors alike. A continuation of my last video (dividend investing vs. growth investing), I want to illustrate via taxes why I personally prefer dividend investing, as it is a tax efficient vehicle (in my personal opinion). I start out with two examples, my recent short-term capital gain on my Bitcoin profit. And, my ownership in McDonald's (MCD), a long-term dividend growth stock, where I'm deferring capital gains (since I never plan to sell) and only have to worry about taxes on my qualified dividends (which fall into the long-term capital gains bucket). Some fun facts you'll learn from my Bitcoin illustration: * I earned 329% in less than a year on my Bitcoin position. * I was subject to short term capital gains. * There is no way I could have held longer (it still have not been 1 year and Bitcoin has fallen 50% from my average sale price). This, in a nutshell, is what plagues growth investors most. Some fun facts you'll learn from my McDonald’s illustration: * I am up 116% via capital appreciation, but owe no taxes right now since I don't intend to sell. (Taxes are only due if one were to sell.) * I enjoy a 5.5% yield on cost (and growing). My dividends are taxed at the lower long-term capital gains tax rate. * Dividend income is taxed at a lower rate than income earned from working! I am incentivized to earn passive vs. active income. For someone looking to live off dividends, this is why I believe dividends are so tax efficient. After my two examples, I dive into a variety of tax-related topics (for investors of all sorts): * Capital appreciation * Dividends * Short-term capital gains * Long-term capital gains * The 3.8% Medicare tax (Obamacare tax) * Qualified dividends vs. non-qualified dividends * Federal vs. state taxes * International companies (and tax implications) * Tax-advantaged vs. non-tax-advantaged accounts (401k and Roth IRA) * More! Want to lean more about dividend stocks vs. growth stocks? Check out this recent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=El7XyomoAEI Want to learn about my experience with Bitcoin? Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQHg6ag7jU Here's my #3 favorite dividend stock of all time, McDonald's (MCD): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA1baKYgV_0 Here's my real estate investment trust (REIT) that is a non-qualified dividend, Realty Income: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-ANUrAsqMc Disclosure: I am long McDonald's (ticker MCD) and Realty Income (ticker O). I own both of these stocks in my portfolio. Disclaimer: I'm not a licensed investment advisor, and today's video is just for entertainment and fun. This video is NOT investment advice. Also, I'm not a tax advisor and today's video is NOT tax advice. Please talk to your licensed investment advisor before making any financial decisions. Please talk to your licensed tax advisor before making any tax decisions. All content on my YouTube channel is (c) Copyright IJL Productions LLC.
Views: 10567 ppcian
IAS 12 - deferred tax and revaluations - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR)
 
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IAS 12 - deferred tax and revaluations - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Free lectures for the ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Exam To benefit from this lecture, visit OpenTuition to download the notes used in the lecture and access all ACCA free resources. Access to all Financial Reporting lectures, and Ask the ACCA Tutor Forums Please go to opentuition to post questions to our ACCA Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube comments section. *** Complete list of free ACCA lectures is available on https://opentuition.com/acca/fr/ ***
Views: 5814 OpenTuition
IAS 12 - deferred tax - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR)
 
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IAS 12 - deferred tax - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Free lectures for the ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Exam To benefit from this lecture, visit OpenTuition to download the notes used in the lecture and access all ACCA free resources. Access to all Financial Reporting lectures, and Ask the ACCA Tutor Forums Please go to opentuition to post questions to our ACCA Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube comments section. *** Complete list of free ACCA lectures is available on https://opentuition.com/acca/fr/ ***
Views: 12049 OpenTuition
Income Tax on Life Insurance Benefits & Annuities : Life Insurance & More
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Ehowfinance Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/Ehowfinance Life insurance benefits and annuities are associated with some very important income tax rules that you're going to want to know. Find out about income tax on life insurance benefits and annuities with help from a longtime financial planner in this free video clip. Expert: Karen Lee Filmmaker: Edward Castner Series Description: It's never too early to start thinking about life insurance, retirement and other types of financial-related plans that are an absolute necessity in today's world. Learn how to get the most for your dollar and plan for your future in the proper way with help from a longtime financial planner in this free video series.
Views: 13319 ehowfinance
Taxation of Investment Income Part 2
 
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Business Career College is a national financial services education provider. See our insurance, financial planning and continuing education courses, including self-paced and instructor led options, at https://www.businesscareercollege.com For great industry articles, follow on Twitter (https://twitter.com/JasonWattBCC) or like on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BusinessCareerCollege/).
Views: 7926 BCC Education
IAS 12 - deferred tax accounting - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR)
 
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IAS 12 - deferred tax accounting - ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Free lectures for the ACCA Financial Reporting (FR) Exam To benefit from this lecture, visit OpenTuition to download the notes used in the lecture and access all ACCA free resources. Access to all Financial Reporting lectures, and Ask the ACCA Tutor Forums Please go to opentuition to post questions to our ACCA Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube comments section. *** Complete list of free ACCA lectures is available on https://opentuition.com/acca/fr/ ***
Views: 8256 OpenTuition
Why Deferred Tax Liabilities Get Created in an M&A Deal
 
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Why Do Deferred Tax Liabilities Matter? They're part of any M&A deal. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/biws/ You'll find you always see them in the purchase price allocation schedule, and they impact the combined company's taxes after the deal takes place. You see them all the time, especially for highly acquisitive companies like Oracle. They reflect the fact that there are TIMING differences between when a company records taxes on its publicly filed Income Statement and when it actually pays those taxes. Specifically, when a buyer writes up the seller's PP&E or Other Intangible Assets in a deal, the buyer depreciates or amortizes them over time... but only on the BOOK version of its statements! It can't do that on the TAX version of its statements it files when paying taxes to the government, which means that the actual amount of cash taxes it pays will be different from what's on its Income Statement. Here's the Easiest Way to Think About DTLs: Instead of thinking about the company's historical situation or its taxable income, think about its FUTURE TAXES. If future cash taxes exceed future book taxes, a DTL will be created. We need to pay ADDITIONAL taxes for items that are not truly tax-deductible. If future cash taxes are less than future book taxes, a DTA will be created. We will pay LESS in taxes than the company's book Income Statement implies. As the book and cash tax payments equalize over time, the DTL or DTA goes away. Two Most Common Questions on DTLs: "Wait a minute - why does a DTL get created immediately? Isn't it caused by the book and cash taxes being different many times historically?" Nope, not necessarily - that CAN be a cause, but DTLs/DTAs can also be created by events that change the company's FUTURE tax situation. So you need to think about how taxes will change in the future, not how they've changed in the past, to determine this. "Wait a minute, the taxable income for book purposes is LOWER than it is for tax purposes - doesn't that create a Deferred Tax ASSET (DTA) instead?" Nope. The relevant question is not how the taxable income differs, but how the FUTURE TAXES will differ. If the company will pay more in cash taxes than book taxes in the FUTURE, as a result of these write-ups, or any other changes, then a DTL gets created.
IAS 12 - Tax Base Definition of Income Received in Advance (IFRS)
 
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Want more free videos to help you pass FAC3701? Visit https://bit.ly/2TMi3uo for more info. HOW DOES TABALDI HELP YOU PASS FAC3701? Tabaldi helps students pass their FAC3701 exams with affordable, easy-to-understand, bite-sized video lectures. Our online classroom is open 24/7 and we offer top quality lecturer support and discussion forums to help you pass your exams. FREE DEMO COURSES FOR UNISA FAC3701 Our DEMO courses are jam-packed with enormous value. When you sign up, you will receive free access to the first study unit of each of our courses. The following is included: • Free lecture videos • Free downloadable content • Free access to our online classroom
Views: 22635 Tabaldi Education
Deferred Tax Asset--Valuation Allowance | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 19 p 4
 
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Deferred tax asset, deferred tax liability, income tax expense, income tax payable, future taxable amount, temporary difference, permanent difference, future deductible amount.deferred tax valuation allowance, reversing, difference in future tax rates, loss carryforward, loss carrybackward, net operating loss, NOL, MACRS, ACRS, tax allocation, interperiod tax allocation, intraperiod tax allocation, tax provision, intermediate accounting, cpa exam
The 7 BEST Tax Write-Offs when Investing in Real Estate!
 
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Here are my 7 favorite tax write offs when it comes to owning real estate or investment property and a few examples of how each of them apply. Enjoy! Feel free to add me on Snapchat / Instagram: GPStephan Owning real estate is much more than just owning a cash producing property that provides monthly profits, what makes it really unique against almost every other investment is the tax write offs associated with it. In real estate, a return could be calculated in so many different ways besides “I get $1000 per month in rent.” What makes real estate really special is that you could often make money every month, but on paper show a loss…and this cancels out your tax obligation. Here are some of the tax write offs that make real estate a phenomenal investment. 1. Mortgage interest write off - On an investment property, the interest that you pay on your mortgage is a write off against your rental income. On a primary residence, the mortgage interest on the first $750,000 could also be a write off, potentially saving thousands in owed taxes. 2. Property taxes - This is another deduction you can write off against your rental and personal income. As a primary residence, you’re allowed to deduct the first $10,000 of your property tax against your personal income As an investment property, you can still deduct 100% of your property taxes against your rental income. 3. Depreciation - This is what often leads you to be positive in your bank account each month, but on paper you could show a loss, lowering the amount you’d pay taxes on. With rental property, you’re allowed to depreciate the asset over a certain period of time. Cost segregation analysis can sometimes speed this dramatically. However, keep in mind that because you’re depreciating a property, eventually the tax you depreciate will need to be paid at the time of sale if you DON’T 1031 it, so it’s not a tax avoidance entirely, but this works great if you plan to keep the home as a rental or eventually do a 1031 exchange later on. 4. 1031 exchange. This is a very popular real estate tax benefit that almost every real estate investor uses. This means that you can sell your property and “Exchange” it for a like property of similar or greater value without paying taxes at the time of the same sale. This is how many people can buy and sell millions without ever paying capital gains taxes, as long as they don’t sell and continue 1031 exchanging properties. 5. Capital gains exclusion on a primary residence: As long as you’ve lived in the home for 2 of the last 5 years, you can sell a your primary residence up to $250,000 HIGHER than you bought it for if you’re single, or $500,000 if you’re married, without owning capital gains tax. 6. Cash out refinance - When used against a rental property, you can refinance the extra equity in the property and pull out the profits tax free. Even though this is technically a loan you have to pay back, you’re borrowing from the existing equity and using that money without paying taxes on the money that hit your account. This gets a little more complicated as a primary residence, but on a rental, this is a huge advantage because the new mortgage you pay on the amount pulled out counts against your rental income…so you can use this money for pretty much whatever you want, hopefully just to re-invest. 7. Finally, rental property income is not taxed as self employment income, which carries a 15.3% self employment tax (not fun). But keep in mind this is also dependent on how you hold the property and specific ways you’re treating your income. Disclosure: I am not a tax consultant or CPA. These are just a few tax advantages I have used myself and I have simplified these significantly for purposes of explaining them on YouTube. Check with your own accountant or CPA because every situation is going to be unique. For business inquiries or one-on-one real estate investing/real estate agent consulting or coaching, you can reach me at [email protected] Suggested reading: The Millionaire Real Estate Agent: http://goo.gl/TPTSVC Your money or your life: https://goo.gl/fmlaJR The Millionaire Real Estate Investor: https://goo.gl/sV9xtl How to Win Friends and Influence People: https://goo.gl/1f3Meq Think and grow rich: https://goo.gl/SSKlyu Awaken the giant within: https://goo.gl/niIAEI The Book on Rental Property Investing: https://goo.gl/qtJqFq Favorite Credit Cards: Chase Sapphire Reserve - https://goo.gl/sT68EC American Express Platinum - https://goo.gl/C9n4e3
Views: 27420 Graham Stephan
How to Pay No Tax on Dividends and Capital Gains
 
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If you are married filing jointly with taxable income of $77,400 or less, you are in the 12% tax bracket. However, add $1 more and you are in the 22% bracket. See how that works? $77,400 = 12% bracket. $77,401 = 22% bracket. This is how marginal rates work: the more income you receive the higher the tax rate on that additional income will be. The tax you paid on your previous income doesn’t change though. You only pay higher taxes on the amount that puts you into the next bracket. How Qualified Dividends and Long-Term Gains Are Taxed Now, let’s say you have total income of $70,000 which consists of $60,000 of work income and $10,000 in the form of Qualified Dividend Income (QDI) and Long Term Capital Gains (LTCG). But you need $80,000 to maintain your lifestyle. So you take a $10,000 distribution from your IRA. That puts you in the 22% tax bracket. The following April you go visit your tax guy to file your taxes. Your tax guy gives you what you initially thought to be a pleasant surprise. He says that you only have to pay 15% on the $10,000 you received as dividends and capital gains even though you are in the 22% tax bracket. This is good news, right? Unfortunately, the reason you’re in the 22% bracket to begin with is the IRA distribution put you there. Now, you owe over $3,000 in taxes. This is bad. You wise up and use a different strategy for the following year. You still need $80,000 to get by. You’re still only making $70,000 from work and dividends. To make up the difference this year you take a distribution from your Roth IRA, not your Traditional. Now, when you go back to your tax guy you really do get a pleasant surprise: you pay $3,000 less in taxes! “Wait a second. How can this be?” You ask. Your tax guy explains. “Your IRA distribution last year not only increased your marginal tax rate to 22% but it also made your dividends and capital gains taxable as well. That $10,000 IRA distribution cost you $1,500 in income tax plus $1,500 in taxes on your dividends and capital gains. A double-whammy if ever there was one! “Because your Roth distribution is tax free you remain in the 12% bracket. Taxpayers who are in the 10% or 12% brackets do not pay tax on their qualified dividends or long term capital gains. So, not only do you not pay taxes on your Roth, you don’t pay taxes on your other investment income either!” Isn’t the Roth beautiful? Taxpayers in the 10% or 12% Brackets Pay ZERO on QDI and LTCG Many people believe they are saving on taxes with their IRA because they are deferring the tax until later. This is true for some taxpayers, especially those currently in a high tax bracket. Deferring a high tax now until later when they may be in a lower bracket is smart planning. But what about taxpayers in the 10%, 12% or 22% brackets? Are they actually saving taxes by deferring though? I don’t think so. Some analysis, of course, would need to go into your specific situation but don’t simply fall for the fallacy that deferring income saves taxes. It most certainly may not. In fact, as the example above shows, it could actually lead you to pay more in tax, maybe even a lot more. To close this chapter, please remember you want to reduce ordinary income taxed investments, like bonds and Traditional IRAs, and increase your tax favorable investments, such as Roth IRAs, qualified dividends and long-term capital gains. If you can get your income to be from Social Security, Roth distributions, qualified dividends and long-term capital gains, you are going to be in a very good place from a tax perspective.
Accounting for Income Taxes | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 19 p 1
 
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Deferred tax asset, deferred tax liability, income tax expense, income tax payable, future taxabale amount, temporary difference, permanent difference, future deductible amount.deferred tax valuation allowance, reversing, difference in future tax rates, loss carryforward, loss carrybackward, net operating loss, NOL, MACRS, ACRS, tax allocation, interperiod tax allocation, intraperiod tax allocation, tax provision
Level I CFA: FRA Income Taxes-Lecture 1
 
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2018 Reading 30 2019 Reading 29 This CFA exam prep video lecture covers: Differences between Accounting Profit and Taxable Income Deferred Tax Liabilities Deferred Tax Assets For the COMPLETE SET of 2018 Level I Videos sign up for the IFT Level I FREE VIDEOS Package: https://ift.world/free Sign-up to get all 2018 Detailed Level I Videos here: http://ift.world/free Subscribe now: http://www.youtube.com/user/arifirfanullah?sub_confirmation=1 For more videos, notes, practice questions, mock exams and more visit: https://www.ift.world/ Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Pass.with.IFT/
Views: 23396 IFT
16 Advanced Accounting: Income Taxes in Business Combinations
 
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In this lesson we discuss how income taxes impact the acquisition accounting. For more information on this subject and other finance topics, visit our website www.FinanceLearningAcademy.com (Video 16 of 20)
Views: 4063 Executive Finance
Property Income and Investments: Individuals - ACCA Taxation (TX-UK) FA2018
 
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Property Income and Investments: Individuals - ACCA Taxation (TX-UK) FA2018 *** Complete list of free lectures for ACCA Taxation (TX-UK) is available on https://opentuition.com/acca/tx/ *** To benefit from this lecture, visit opentuition.com/acca to download the notes used in the lecture and access ALL free resources: ACCA lectures, ACCA Taxation (TX-UK) tests and Ask the ACCA Tutor Forums Please go to opentuition to post questions to ACCA Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube.
Views: 1233 OpenTuition
How Do My Investments Affect My Taxes?
 
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Nate Ritchison, CFP® answers your question of the week by sharing how to do tax smart investing by learning how investments will affect your taxes. There are different types of accounts where you can hold your money and they are all taxed at different rates. Investors have the option to invest in tax-deferred, tax free and taxable accounts. It's important to be strategic with where you hold your money and which accounts you use to invest for more optimal tax savings. By investing tax-efficiently and employing strategies such as tax loss harvesting, you're able to save more in long term. Transcription: "Hi, I'm Nate Ritchison, Certified Financial Planner™ with Pure Financial Advisors, and this is Question of the Week. This week's question is: How do my investments affect my taxes?There're a couple things to consider. Number one is how you how you save the money. You can use certain accounts to give you tax advantages--things like a deductible 401(k) or an IRA will give you tax deductions, but be careful because you'll have to start paying taxes on those when you start withdrawing those funds. Other accounts like a Roth IRA don't give you the tax deduction but they give you tax-free growth. So you have to be aware of how those dollars going in to that account are taxed in order to figure out how you're going to pay tax down the road. Those are tax advantaged accounts. The other thing you have to consider is anything outside of those types of retirement accounts would be a regular investment, a taxable investment account. The two things you have to consider on those are the gains and the income that are produced. The gains are going to be taxed typically if you've held it for over a year, at capital gains rates, which are always lower than your ordinary income tax rates. If you've held it for less than a year, you'll be subject to that same ordinary income tax rate on those gains. The second thing is the income. The income on those investments are also going to be taxed. It depends if you have dividend income from stocks or if you have interest income from bonds. There are many different ways, but dividend income generally speaking is taxed the same rate as capital gains. Interest, however, can be either taxed at ordinary income tax rates or tax-free. An example of the ordinary income tax rate would be corporate bonds; you receive that income so you have to claim that on your tax return. However, with municipal bonds, you're going to be subject to no tax--you actually get a tax advantage and tax re-growth in income off that. Those are just some examples of ways that investments can affect your taxes. Again, my name is Nate Ritchison, with Pure Financial Advisors, and this has been Question of the Week." http://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
All About 1031 Tax Deferred Exchanges - Real Estate Investment Tips
 
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For an experienced SF Bay Area real estate agent visit http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com Like me on Facebook: http://fb.com/iLiveInTheBayArea Thumbs up, favorite, share, subscribe and make a comment! Most people are aware of the fact that when you sell a long term investment such as real estate or stocks, you have to pay taxes. But did you know there's a way you can defer that and not even pay a SINGLE PENNY?? It's called a 1031 Tax Deferred exchange. If you're looking to avoid paying capital gains tax, the 1031 exchange is by far the most common financial technique...now that's good to know. Contact Davide Pio Today | SF Bay Area Real Estate http://iLiveInTheBayArea.com | 510-815-2000
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.rws-llc.com/ 614-471-1888 Watch our next webcast to discover how to use whiteboard videos like this to grow your financial advisory practice: http://events.faclientmachine.com/event-registration-3/ Retirement Wealth Strategies 4196 Laet Dr. Columbus, OH 43219 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFKK4Mb3XKQ&list=PLD0PqLJ1GXTS4oNPb6ivj9GTRIaucrfvS&index=423
Views: 19 Jill Addison
9 Income जो Tax Free है ! (9 Incomes which are Tax Free in India)
 
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There are some sources of income which are tax free in India. You don't need to pay any income tax on these income. In this video I talk about 9 such sources which are: 1- Income Tax on Agricultural Income 2-Income tax on Long Term Capital Gain in Equity 3-Income tax on Savings Bank Interest 4- Income Tax on receivable from HUF 5-Income Tax on share of profit from a partnership firm 6-Income Tax on Allowance for Foreign Services 7- Income Tax on Gratuity 8-Income tax on amount received in VRS 9-Income tax on Scholarship and Awards Music Credits: Carefree by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400037 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 315360 Average Indian
Capital Gains Tax on the Sale of Real Estate
 
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Have a 1031 exchange question you'd like addressed? Post it in the comments! A basic calculation of tax on the cash-out of an investment property of real estate and the potential to defer these taxes by reinvesting sales revenue into a 1031 like-kind exchange.
Views: 74154 Accruit
CFA level I-Deferred Tax Asset and Liabilities- Introduction
 
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FinTree website link: http://www.fintreeindia.com FB Page link :http://www.facebook.com/Fin... We love what we do, and we make awesome video lectures for CFA and FRM exams. Our Video Lectures are comprehensive, easy to understand and most importantly, fun to study with! This Video lecture was recorded by our popular trainer for CFA, Mr. Utkarsh Jain, during one of his live CFA Level I Classes in Pune (India). #CFA #FinTree
Views: 34243 FinTree
How to avoid paying capital gains tax
 
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Did you know if you sell anything you own for more than you paid for it, then you may owe capital gains tax? Here's how you can avoid it, using chocolate coins to demonstrate.
Views: 32577 Washington Post
Real Estate Revealed: How to AVOID Paying Taxes...(Legally, of course)
 
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Ever wondered how so many people seem to avoid paying taxes…legally, of course, when investing in real estate? Want to know how YOU can avoid paying taxes, legally? Here’s how - enjoy! Add me on Snapchat/Instagram: GPStephan Join the private Real Estate Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/therealestatemillionairemastermind/ Get $50 OFF + FREE Coaching Call FOR A LIMITED TIME: Code THANKYOU50 - The Real Estate Agent Academy: Learn how to start and grow your career as a Real Estate Agent to a Six-Figure Income, how to best build your network of clients, expand into luxury markets, and the exact steps I’ve used to grow my business from $0 to over $120 million in sales: https://goo.gl/UFpi4c Number 1: The first is that pretty much anything in real estate that relates to your business is a write off against your income. Just about anything you related to the income you make on a rental property is a BUSINESS expense, and that’s subtracted from your total income - and you pay less taxes. Number 2: Depreciation. This is probably THE best write off in real estate. This is often how people can make thousands of dollars in profit every month, but on PAPER, they’re claiming they LOST money. In some circumstances you can even use this loss to offset other income you made! Number 3: This is probably the most well known, and probably one of the coolest write offs in real estate… but for those who aren’t familiar with it, this is the 1031 Exchange. One of the benefits of investing in real estate is that you can INDEFINITELY defer paying taxes when you sell a property, and “exchange” it for another property to avoid paying tax on your profit. Number Four: This would apply to most of you watching, especially if you own your own home, is the capital Gains exclusion. This capital gains exclusion means that you can make $250,000 TAX FREE PROFIT if you’re single, and $500,000 TAX FREE PROFIT if you’re married when you own a primary residence and have lived there for 2 of the last 5 years. Number 5: There’s no tax on appreciation until you sell. This is similar to owning a stock that goes up in value, you don’t pay taxes on that stock until you actually sell…until then, any profit you’ve made is called an “unrealized gain.” Same thing in real estate. If the property goes up in value 5% annually, your net worth goes up without you owning a dime in taxes. Number 6: The cash-out refinance and HELOC, which stands for Home Equity Line Of Credit. The benefit of this is that you get access to your money, totally tax free, without technically “making” money. In the eyes of the IRS, you don’t pay tax until you actually sell…and because you don’t sell, you don’t owe any tax. Same principle applies to a HELOC. All of the money you pull out is tax-free since technically it’s a loan and you need to pay it back. Number 7: Rental income doesn’t pay self employment taxes, which consists of social security and medicare taxes. This means that rental income, right off the top, is taxed 6.2% LESS than that same income you’d make from you job - or 15.3% less if you’re self employed, not even including all the deductions, tax write offs, depreciation…so you can see, real estate is a good way to make some money ;) Number 8: Mortgage interest deduction. Now this is a great one that not only applies to rental properties, where you simply just use that as an expense against rental income, but this also applies to your personal residence. The IRS says that you can deduct the interest you pay on up to $750,000 of your mortgage against your earned income, lowering the amount of taxes you’d owe. Finally…number 9…the holy grail for real estate people…is the title called “Real Estate Professional.” Becoming a “real estate professional” opens up a lot of advantages. The biggest advantage of being a real estate professional is that you can use your PAPER LOSSES to OFFSET other earned income! Remember: this is not financial advice, and CONSULT A CPA for any of your specific tax questions. Everyone is different and it’s important to hire someone for your own specific tax advice and needs. For business inquiries or paid one-on-one real estate investing/real estate agent consulting or coaching, you can reach me at [email protected] Suggested reading: The Millionaire Real Estate Agent: http://goo.gl/TPTSVC Your money or your life: https://goo.gl/fmlaJR The Millionaire Real Estate Investor: https://goo.gl/sV9xtl How to Win Friends and Influence People: https://goo.gl/1f3Meq Think and grow rich: https://goo.gl/SSKlyu Awaken the giant within: https://goo.gl/niIAEI The Book on Rental Property Investing: https://goo.gl/qtJqFq Favorite Credit Cards: Chase Sapphire Reserve - https://goo.gl/sT68EC American Express Platinum - https://goo.gl/C9n4e3
Views: 122917 Graham Stephan
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments?
 
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http://www.ericksonfinancialsolutions.com (573) 874-3888 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes.Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt.Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year.These include investments like CDs and money market funds.Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interestis not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply.The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal.So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio.Give us a call today. https://youtu.be/FZ5wrpLp4L0?list=PL5PObFhC3MzlyNDqMgaSLIIjW7nVBgywI
Views: 77 Steven Erickson
Deferred Tax Liability | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 19 p 2
 
27:09
Deferred tax asset, deferred tax liability, income tax expense, income tax payable, future taxabale amount, temporary difference, permanent difference, future deductible amount.deferred tax valuation allowance, reversing, difference in future tax rates, loss carryforward, loss carrybackward, net operating loss, NOL, MACRS, ACRS, tax allocation, interperiod tax allocation, intraperiod tax allocation, tax provision, cpa exam, deferred tax
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.novapointcapital.com (404) 445-7885 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: Taxable, Tax-Deferred and Tax-Exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they're earned each year – These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 and half – like 401ks or IRAs. Tax-Exempt interest are not taxable either by Federal or State taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you're in, and if capital gains rules apply. The highest Investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So Focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don't make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make Tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://youtu.be/p5WLedXqN4E
Views: 34 NovaPoint Capital
Deferred Tax Asset | Intermediate Accounting | CPA Exam FAR | Chp 19 p 3
 
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Deferred tax asset, deferred tax liability, income tax expense, income tax payable, future taxabale amount, temporary difference, permanent difference, future deductible amount.deferred tax valuation allowance, reversing, difference in future tax rates, loss carryforward, loss carrybackward, net operating loss, NOL, MACRS, ACRS, tax allocation, interperiod tax allocation, intraperiod tax allocation, tax provision
The Secret to Retirement Planning with Minimal Taxation
 
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Financial planning and taxes in your retirement years does not have to be a scary thing for baby boomers and retirees. In fact, there are very simple ways to safeguard your retirement income from both volatility and taxation. In this video Rob discusses where IRA's, 401k's, and 529 Plans fit in the spectrum of taxation and financial planning. A few of the key topics in this video that you will learn are: Capital gains versus ordinary income tax Tax-free versus tax-deferred Where annuities fit in your retirement plan How a private pension is a viable alternative investment. Please subscribe to our channel above to make sure you receive updates on all future retirement videos. We post new retirement videos like this every Tuesday and Friday so please Subscribe now to get instant updates on our upcoming videos. Download the Free report at http://www.privatepension.com today
Views: 181423 Retirement Think Tank
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.globalfinancialtrust.com (616) 956-9900 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DyGFNah6EY&list=PLP0tUpRxpOsYy71C86FZ6_4eWtxk2Pvu1&index=9
Views: 17 Amie Moran
1 Minute Tip- How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.rws-llc.com/ 614-471-1888 Retirement Wealth Strategies 4196 Laet Dr. Columbus, OH 43219 Bob Hanna Mark Hughes Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today.
Capital Gains and Losses - Taxes On Investment Property Sale (2019)
 
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Toby Mathis answers this question and more during Tax Tuesdays a bi-weekly event that is open to YOU and getting YOUR tax questions answered! Get YOUR most pressing tax questions answered by one of the nations tax Attorneys, Toby Mathis! Join Toby LIVE during this exclusive bi-weekly webinar. MORE INFO 👉https://AndersonAdvisors.com/tax-tuesdays With all the new tax laws congress passed that are in effect for 2018 don't miss this opportunity to get your questions answered LIVE with Toby Mathis of Anderson Business Advisors. Whether your a small business owner, real estate business owner, or you have a corporation, the new tax laws that were passed in 2017 will have some impact on what tax deductions you can take. Don't be caught off guard or miss out on important tax saving strategies that you're business is entitled to. Join Us LIVE 👉https://AndersonAdvisors.com/tax-tuesdays * 🚀Ready To Take Your Business To The Next Level While Protecting Your Assets From Frivolous Lawsuits? ~*~ 💰Get Your FREE 30 min Consultation & Wealth Planning Blueprint NOW! https://AndersonAdvisors.com/register-now-a Check out https://AndersonAdvisors.com for financial strategies and details on upcoming workshops. ** SUBSCRIBE** Anderson Business Advisors Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/AndersonBusinessAdvisors 800.706.4741 https://AndersonAdvisors.com Twitter: @TaxWiseToby Blog: https://TobyMathis.com The information provided in this video should not be construed or relied on as legal advice for any specific fact or circumstance. Its content was prepared by Anderson Business Advisors with its main office at 3225 McLeod Drive Suite 100 Las Vegas, Nevada 89121. This video is designed for entertainment and information purposes only. Viewing this video does not create an attorney-client relationship with Anderson Business Advisors or any of its lawyers. You should not act or rely on any of the information contained herein without seeking professional legal advice.
How to Reduce Taxes Under New Tax Law (2018) Interest Income
 
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Interest and dividend income are other areas of the tax code that punishes the ignorant. You have income on lines 8a, 8b, 9a and 9b? Why? Is there a strategic reason for earning this income in order to pay tax? If so, that's fine. Maybe you need the cash to help pay the bills, pay tuition, take a vacation, etc. However if you're receiving this income because of how your investments are designed without any strategic intent, I suggest you consider a different plan of action Let's start by looking at what types of income you have. If you have interest income, from bonds and/or CDs, this income is taxed at ordinary income rates. Worse yet, there is NOTHING you can do about it other than paying the tax on it...as ordinary income. Consider moving ANY holding you have that yields ordinary income(OI), into your Traditional IRA in order to defer those OI taxes as long as you possibly can. Remember your IRA is taxed as Ordinary Income anyway. So, having an IRA taxed at those rates PLUS having investment income taxed at the same means your paying too much in tax. If you have municipal bond income, i.e., 'tax exempt interest' consider scrapping those and instead moving into corporate and/or government bonds inside your IRA. Because municipals are tax free they offer a much lower interest rate than corporate and government bonds. So, for simplicity, say a municipal bonds yields 2.5% a corporate bond will pay more because it's income is taxed. A corporate bond with similar maturity date may pay 4%. This means it takes $320,000 in assets to yield $8,000 in income for the municipal bond but only $227,272 for the corporate bond AFTER taxes for someone in the 12% bracket! That is a significant difference in the allocation amount to corporate bonds over tax free bonds to receive the same after tax income. We don't municipal bonds, unless we're in the higher tax brackets, those above 22%. We don't want ANY bonds in our taxable account either. We want bonds in our Traditional IRA. Secondly, we want dividend paying stocks, the investments that give us income on lines 9a and 9b, in our ROTH IRA. DIvidends we don't need only cause higher taxes. Avoid that. Move your income-oriented stocks to your Roth. Lastly, we want your most aggressive holdings, ideally the ones with little to no dividends or capital gains in your taxable accounts. The unrealized appreciation on these investments cause you NO tax. Because these holdings are aggressive they should pay no dividends whatsoever. Lastly when it does come time to sell a position in order to generate cash, you can work the tax code to do it in the most tax-favored way possible. You can't do with other income you receive from your investments. Finally, at death, the growth of these aggressive accounts transfer TAX FREE to your heirs because of the step up basis rules. IRA accounts don't have that benefit. Roth IRA accounts don't have a step up in basis but they are tax free anyway, which is just as good. At the end of the day, it's up to YOU to understand the tax code to take advantage of it to your benefit. If your advisor isn't helping you with this, well, hate to sound brutal but seek a new advisor! ================================= If you like what you see, a thumbs up helps A LOT. So, give me a thumbs up, please! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE by clicking here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSEzy4i9xrKPoaU9z0_XbmA?sub_confirmation=1 GET MY BOOK: Strategic Money Planning: 8 Easy Ways To Put Your House In Order It's FREE if you're a Kindle Unlimited Subscriber! https://amzn.to/2wKGi50 GET ALL MY LATEST BLOGPOSTS: http://heritagewealthplanning.com/blog/ PODCAST: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/josh-scandlen-podcast/id1368065459?mt=2 LET'S SOCIALIZE! Facebook: http://Facebook.com/heritagewealthplanning Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshscandlen/ Quora: https://www.quora.com/profile/Josh-Scandlen Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/1/108893802372783791910
Taxes on Dividends Explained - TurboTax Tax Tip Video
 
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https://turbotax.intuit.com If you purchase stock in a corporation or invest in a mutual fund that periodically pays dividends, the payments you receive throughout the year can provide you with some extra income. Though you must always report the dividend income on your tax return—it doesn't always mean you will pay tax on it. Find out more about taxes on dividends with this helpful tax tip video from TurboTax. TurboTax Home: https://turbotax.intuit.com TurboTax Support: https://ttlc.intuit.com/ TurboTax Blog: http://blog.turbotax.intuit.com TurboTax Twitter: https://twitter.com/turbotax TurboTax Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TurboTax TurboTax Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/turbotax/ TurboTax Tumblr: http://turbotax.tumblr.com/
Views: 17804 TurboTax
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.wealthabundance.com (920) 202-3765 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal.So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://youtu.be/hMP1HBlv4l0
How to Invest Your 401k
 
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http://www.profitableinvestingtips.com/profitable-investing-tips/how-to-invest-your-401k How to Invest Your 401k By www.ProfitableInvestingTips.com A great way to save money and defer taxes is with a 401k plan. We consider how to invest your 401k. The limits on how much you can invest tax free each year in a 401k are higher than with an IRA. In the USA a 401k plan is a tax-qualified, defined-contribution pension account defined in subsection 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code. Money is deducted from a paycheck before taxes and commonly is matched by a contribution from the employer. As of 2013 the maximum pre-tax annual amount allowed for a 401k was $17,500. This money can be invested in a variety of ways and can grow tax free over the years only to be taxed when the individual decides to withdraw, typically at retirement. In some 401k plans a post-tax contribution is also allowed. Post-tax contributions also are allowed to grow within the 401k account tax free until withdrawal. Make sure that you understand how your 401k works and get competent tax advice if you are confused. In this article we have a few ideas about how to invest your 401k. Remember that when you take your money out of your 401k it is taxed as ordinary income so your retirement years when you have no salary are the best times to withdraw your money. How to Invest Your 401k: How It Works When you put your money in a 401k or other tax deferred plan you are dealing with marginal tax rates. This has to do with the amount of tax paid on an additional dollar of income. The marginal tax rate for an individual will increase as income rises. When you put money in your 401k you are taking money that you would invest or save anyway. And you are not taxed for this last bit of income so long as it goes into your 401k. That can be a savings of around 25%. Then the appreciation of your investment in the 401k is allowed to increase without yearly taxes. For example, if you have a dividend stock in your 401k portfolio you will not be taxed on the dividends over the years. Likewise, if you buy a growth stock and then sell it after a big run up you will not pay capital gains on the stock while it is in your 401k. When you do pay taxes, it will be when you are retired and typically in a lower tax bracket. The exponential growth of your investments is substantially better when not taxed until it is taxed just one time on withdrawal. This is why a 401k is a preferred way to save. How to Invest Your 401k: Best Vehicles Always remember that how you invest your 401k versus investments with other vehicles has to do with the tax advantages of deferring taxes until after an investment has exponentially appreciated in value for many years. As an example you would not want to put municipal bonds in a 401k because they are already tax advantaged. In our most recent articles, Invest Your Money, we note that you should pay off credit card debts, purchase a home and have a rainy day stash in the bank before thinking about investing. To a degree this also applies to the first years of how to invest your 401k. Thereafter think of long term growth stocks, hot stocks that you can buy cheap and sell when then they run up and avoid the immediate tax consequences and stocks with a substantial margin of safety. This is because the worst thing that can happen is that you play with your 401k and lose everything. The way to save money on paying taxes on investment income is decidedly not to have any 401k withdrawals on which to pay taxes. http://youtu.be/SC8EwdM45U0
Views: 3967 InvestingTip
Roth vs pre-tax contributions
 
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If you're like many people, you've heard about Roth contributions but don't really know what they are or why you may use them to help you save for retirement. Learn more about what you should consider as you choose the option that's best for you.
Can foreigners defer capital gains taxes by buying another investment property.
 
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Broker An Flamand explains a 1031 exchange. for more questions email An: [email protected] or call; (001) 407-800-0888 Hi my name is An Flamand, I’m the Broker with Orlando Vacation Realty and today’s question is ‘can foreigners defer capital gains taxes when buying another investment property?’. Yes, foreigners can actually defer capital gains taxes when buying another property. It’s called the 1031 Exchange. However, it can be kind of tricky and there are some rules and regulations that you need to be aware of. For sure, your Realtor or your Broker should be able to explain to you in detail what the requirements are to a 1031 Exchange. So, it is definitely possible to defer capital gains taxes when buying another investment property. Just know the rules and regulations and make sure you meet the requirements. If you have any other questions, email me at [email protected] . And, I look forward to hearing from you! Have a great day.
Views: 74 An Flamand
Retirement Money Withdrawal Strategies to Minimize taxes
 
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The worst way to withdraw money during retirement? No matter how old you are, retirement is approaching or is already here. This means that you are going to have to withdraw some of the money you worked your whole life to save. But there’s a way to withdraw this money so that you don’t end up putting it in Uncle Sam’s pocket instead of your own. You need to minimize taxes, and keeping your investments working for you for as long as possible.In fact, if you withdraw money the wrong way, it could cost you tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost potential gains and unnecessary taxes. First you should always withdraw from your taxable investment income first. This means withdraw the dividends and capital gains that you have earned on your investments every year. Why? Because you have already paid taxes on these, so keeping them in the investment is not saving you any taxes. And Municipal bond income, if you have it in your taxable account should be the first one to draw on because all interest is completely federal tax free. But otherwise dividends and interest income should be your first tap. If you are seventy and a half, the federal government requires that you withdraw a certain portion of your IRA. This is called RMD or Required Minimum Distribution. Uncle Sam does this because they want their money, and they don’t want you to sit on it forever. They think that once you’re 70, you should start withdrawing it, so that you can pay your taxes on them before you die. And if you don’t withdraw, they will penalize you. So you have to do this first because otherwise you end up paying a hefty penalty if you don’t. It is almost never a good idea to not withdraw the required amount, and instead pay the penalty. However, if you are not 70 and a half, and you don’t need to withdraw from an IRA, then don’t withdraw. The reason is that the Federal government is allowing this investment to grow tax free until you withdraw. This means that all the interest and dividends that you would have paid taxes on, remains tax free in an IRA, so you make interest on top of your interest. So you will maximize your returns if you leave it in there for as long as you can. The minimum age you can withdraw is 59 and a half, but if you don’t need the money, you should let it ride until you are 70 and a half. Tap into your regular IRA before tapping into your Roth IRA. Your Roth IRA should be the last place you withdraw from. This seems counter intuitive because any withdrawal from your Roth IRA is tax free. So Why should you let it ride? Because the money you put into your Roth IRA was after tax, and the federal government has given you the gift of letting it grow tax free forever, and you can withdraw it tax free at anytime. The reason you should touch this last is because it is the most efficient way let your money grow. And the ROTH IRA does not require any minimum distributions after you reach seventy and a half. So you can leave your money there for as long as you want with absolutely no tax consequences. Even your heirs can take it out tax free. So it has huge tax advantages. If you plan on leaving your kids an inheritance, a Roth IRA would be one of the most valuable assets you could give them. And although you generally want to let your regular IRA grow tax deferred as long as possible too, if your assets in an IRA are very large, it could push you into a higher tax bracket. In that case, consider taking some money out before you reach 70 and a half, but after you reach the age of 59. You do not want to withdraw anything from an IRA before the age of 59 or you will pay a penalty to Uncle Sam. Lastly, the way that you invest your money in taxable vs non-taxable accounts can also make a huge difference in the money you end up having. So If you have a mix of stocks and bonds, you should put investments with the highest tax consequences in tax deferred accounts such as IRA’s instead of taxable accounts. So for example, all your bond funds which pay high yearly dividends subject to taxes, should be located in IRA’s and your stocks, which usually pay much less in dividends should be in taxable accounts. A study by Vanguard showed that a $100,000 portfolio where stocks were in taxable accounts, and bonds were in tax-deferred accounts would be worth about $170,000 in 10 years. Whereas if the stocks were in tax-deferred accounts, and bonds in taxable accounts – the account would be worth only $153,000 after 10 years. Taxable accounts should hold the most tax efficient investments such as municipal bonds which are not subject to federal tax, and stock funds with low turnover which results in lower yearly capital gains taxes. Non taxable accounts should hold the least tax efficient investments such as long term bond funds and high dividend-paying stocks.
Views: 425 Arvin Ash
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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https://www.olderaleighfinancial.com (919) 861-8212 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrnXBRE_kH4&list=PLRgrm_jqx9lTxdsXvLbe3gvXqqlm1ONzG&index=6
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.myafg.net (520) 886-8686 Get Whiteboard Animated Videos like this one for your business here: http://www.jilladdison.com/get-monthly-videos-for-a-low-monthly-rate How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt gains are not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts. Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://youtu.be/pROUXcf7ddo?list=PLD0PqLJ1GXTS4oNPb6ivj9GTRIaucrfvS
Views: 62 Jill Addison
Deferred Tax.avi
 
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Presentation on DT, DTL and DTA
Views: 13583 DVRamanaXIMB
5 Reasons Not To Invest In An Annuity And 5 Reasons You May Want To
 
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Here are 5 reasons you should NOT invest in an annuity. And then we'll discuss 5 reasons you may want to invest in an annuity. To download your free copy of "How To Avoid Annuity Traps" just click here: http://retirementplanningmadeeasy.com... Here are 5 reasons you should NOT purchase an annuity. 1. You want 100% market upside with no downside potential - You can't that. Fixed index annuities can give you SOME market upside with no downside potential. But there is no investment that will give you all the market's growth with no downside. Annuities certainly will not do this. 2. You want to keep your money liquid - Most annuities have surrender charges for a certain period of time. If you are going to need to access your funds during this time, an annuity is probably not going to be a good investment for you. 3. You want to get 8% guaranteed interest on your money - The ads that tout abnormally high interest rates are (9 times out of 10) applying that rate to a phantom account called in "Income Account Value." This is an accounting figure used to determine how much the insurance company will guarantee to pay you for life. It's not growth on your real "walk away" money account. 4. You want additional tax deferral on your IRA - Annuities provide tax deferral on earnings. But you won't get a "double" tax deferral benefit by using IRA funds in an annuity. When using IRA funds in an annuity, make sure it is for another benefit annuities provide, like downside protection from the market (fixed annuities) and income guarantees. 5. You want to trade frequently - When you put your money in an annuity you are letting other people manage it for you. It will be managed based on the sub-accounts you choose (in a variable annuity) or based on the index you pick (for a fixed index annuity). If you want to trade frequently, then you probably shouldn't get an annuity. Now let's talk about 5 reasons you may want to consider an annuity: 1. You want SOME market upside with no downside loss - A fixed index annuity can do this. It won't give all the upside though, but you won't lose money if the market crashes. Remember, these are conservative investments, originally made to compete with CD's. 2. You don't mind committing your funds for the long-term - There's nothing wrong with committing your funds for a longer term period, as long as the annuity is helping you meet a retirement objective. 3. You want a guaranteed interest rate - The most popular annuities that provide this are "Multi Year Guaranteed Annuities." They lock in a rate for a set period of time. 4. You want to leave more money to your heirs - If you can't qualify for life insurance an annuity may be able to increase the legacy you leave to your heirs (the beneficiaries of the annuity). 5. You want a money manager to handle your investments - If you invest in a variable annuity your funds will be put in sub-accounts that are managed by money managers. There's nothing wrong with wanting a professional to invest your money. To download your free copy of "How To Avoid Annuity Traps" just click here: http://retirementplanningmadeeasy.com... Disclosures: Investment Advisory Services offered through Retirement Wealth Advisors Inc. (RWA) a Registered Investment Advisor. Retirement Planning Made Easy / Tri-State Financial Group and RWA are not affiliated. Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Consult your financial professional before making any investment decision. This information is designed to provide general information on the subjects covered, it is not, however, intended to provide specific legal or tax advice and cannot be used to avoid tax penalties or to promote, market, or recommend any tax plan or arrangement. Please note that Retirement Planning Made Easy / Tri-State Financial Group and its affiliates do not give legal or tax advice. You are encouraged to consult your tax advisor or attorney. Annuity guarantees rely on the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer. Any comments regarding safe and secure investments, and guaranteed income streams refer only to fixed insurance products. They do not refer, in any way to securities or investment advisory products. Fixed Insurance and Annuity product guarantees are subject to the claims‐paying ability of the issuing company and are not offered by Retirement Wealth Advisors Inc.
Corporate Investing - RDTOH
 
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Video explaining Refundable Dividend Tax on Hand in the context of corporate investments. Business Career College is a national financial services education provider. See our insurance, financial planning and continuing education courses, including self-paced and instructor led options, at https://www.businesscareercollege.com For great industry articles, follow on Twitter (https://twitter.com/JasonWattBCC) or like on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BusinessCareerCollege/).
Views: 10503 BCC Education
How to Develop Tax-Efficient Streams of Income in Retirement | S.2 Episode 26
 
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We always say, “control the things you can control.” Taxes are one of them, and it starts with creating a tax-efficient stream of income. In this episode, you’ll find out how to manage your income tax liability and better understand how the tax system works. Senior Financial Planner , David Cook joins the show to discuss tax-efficient strategies for investors. Why spend more on taxes when you could spend that money on enjoying your retirement? 0:26 “Taxes will take way more from you than the stock market ever will, so why take on all that risk when you’ll lose half of it to taxes?” 2:00 “Taxes play such a key role in the success or failure of your retirement” 2:48 “If you have tax-efficient income, you can spend more, you don’t have to take as much risk in your portfolio and you run less risk running out of your money” 3:41 “People think that they’re going to be in a lower tax bracket in retirement, but it really depends on the characteristic of the income you’re receiving” 7:40 “Hi, I’m Matt Balderston, Certified Financial Planner™ with Pure Financial Advisors. Did you know according to U.S. Money, the average retirement benefit as of last December was $1,282 per month? 9:21 “There are different pools of money you can invest in and they’re all taxed differently” 12:34 “Most financial planner and people are told to defer, defer, defer” 13:09 “Age 70 ½ is when you have to take your required minimum distributions, so you’re forced to start taking money and at that same time, that’s when Social Security starts to kick in. So, there’s a high likelihood for most people that you’re not necessarily going to be in a lower bracket” 13:24 “You want to have some diversification in how you invest and where you pull money out because that’s going to give you the control over what your tax situation is throughout retirement; it’s going to save you a lot more money in the long run” 17:47 “You want to make sure that you set yourself up, that you have money in each of the different [tax pools] areas and come up with a solution or a strategy because when it comes time to take money, you have different areas to pull from” 23:39 “If you have a 401(k) there’s good news—based upon a new pronouncement in September, you can take your after-tax money and put it directly toward a Roth IRA without paying any tax, you can then roll the rest to an IRA” 24:47 “Inside your retirement account doesn’t really matter because it grows tax-deferred, outside of your retirement account—that’s where you’ve got to be a little more sophisticated in your overall investment strategy to reduce those taxes as much as you can” Aired 7/4/15 If you live in southern California and would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, copy/paste this link in your search bar: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” Channels & show times: yourmoneyyourwealth.com http://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Tax Deferred Investments Versus Taxable ✔ Stock Market
 
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Views: 248 Warren
Generating Tax Efficient Income In Retirement
 
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If you need or want income from your investments during retirement, numerous studies have shown that if you take the time to create a tax efficient withdrawal strategy, you can actually make your money last an extra six or seven years In a perfect world, your retirement money would be in three buckets, taxable, tax deferred and tax free. Taxable money is individual and joint accounts. Tax deferred accounts are accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s. Tax free accounts are Roth IRAs and tax free municipal bonds. Years ago, the common withdrawal strategy would be take your income from your taxable account including principal and deplete the account and then take money from the tax deferred account, IRAs and 401(k)s and leave the tax free account alone for as long as possible. Today, a better strategy is to take money first from tax deferred accounts which will trigger taxable income, but only take enough that would generate or keep you in the 12% tax bracket. If you need income from investments that would push you above the 12% tax bracket, make up the difference by taking money from your taxable account and if necessary, make up any additional shortfall by pulling money from your tax free Roth IRA account. Everybody's situation is different so the order in which you pull money from the different type of accounts can change one year to the next. The important thing to remember is there is no one perfect investment capable of generating tax efficient income over the long hall because your circumstances will most definitely change not to mention changes to tax laws. The better approach is to have a diversified tax strategy consisting of taxable, tax deferred and tax free accounts. If you are top heavy in any one area, you need to be looking at ways to distribute funds over time into all three of those. Making sure you have a tax efficient income strategy in retirement will help move you one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want when you want.
Views: 77 Brian Fricke
How to be Tax Efficient with Your Investments
 
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http://www.retirementsolutionsllc.net (314) 576-5991 Tax efficient investing involves strategies to help reduce the impact of taxes. Investments have three tax flavors: taxable, tax-deferred and tax-exempt. Taxable requires gains to be paid as they are earned each year. These include investments like CDs and money market funds. Tax-deferred gains remain sheltered from taxes until withdrawn for retirement at age 59 ½ like 401(k)s or IRAs. Tax-exempt interest is not taxable either by federal or state taxes. To determine the tax effect of your investments, you must know which tax bracket you’re in and if capital gains rules apply. The highest investment income minus the lowest taxes due is your investment goal. So focus on placing fully taxable investments in tax-deferred accounts.Don’t make the common mistake of putting investments that have tax benefits into an IRA. You will lose those tax benefits since all distributions from traditional IRAs are 100% taxable. Let us help you make tax efficient investments in your portfolio. Give us a call today. https://youtu.be/Uh1lEHoaFTc?list=PLYZ-SsCyx6hwVTnEvbuTxpbdqYdAYtZN4
Views: 19 David Malone