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What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean? CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY definition - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cross-cultural psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including both their variability and invariance, under diverse cultural conditions. Through expanding research methodologies to recognize cultural variance in behavior, language, and meaning it seeks to extend and develop psychology. Since psychology as an academic discipline was developed largely in North America and Europe, some psychologists became concerned that constructs accepted as universal were not as invariant as previously assumed, especially since many attempts to replicate notable experiments in other cultures had varying success. Since there are questions as to whether theories dealing with central themes, such as affect, cognition, conceptions of the self, and issues such as psychopathology, anxiety, and depression, may lack external validity when "exported" to other cultural contexts, cross-cultural psychology re-examines them using methodologies designed to factor in cultural differences so as to account for cultural variance. Although some critics have pointed to methodological flaws in cross-cultural psychological research and claim that serious shortcomings in the theoretical and methodological bases used impede rather than help the scientific search for universal principles in psychology, cross-cultural psychologists are turning more to the study of how differences (variance) occur, rather than searching for universals in the style of physics or chemistry. While cross-cultural psychology represented only a minor area of psychology prior to WWII, it began to grow in importance during the 1960s. In 1971, the interdisciplinary Society for Cross-Cultural Research (SCCR) was founded, and in 1972 the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP) was established. Since then, this branch of psychology has continued to expand as there has been an increasing popularity of incorporating culture and diversity into studies of numerous psychological phenomena. Cross-cultural psychology is differentiated from cultural psychology, which refers to the branch of psychology that holds that human behavior is strongly influenced by cultural differences, meaning that psychological phenomena can only be compared with each other across cultures to a limited extent. In contrast, cross-cultural psychology includes a search for possible universals in behavior and mental processes. Cross-cultural psychology "can be thought of as a type research methodology, rather than an entirely separate field within psychology". In addition, cross-cultural psychology can be distinguished from international psychology which centers around the global expansion of psychology especially during recent decades. Nevertheless, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and international psychology are united by a common concern for expanding psychology into a universal discipline capable of understanding psychological phenomena across cultures and in a global context.
Views: 6117 The Audiopedia
What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE mean? CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE definition - CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cross-cultural competence refers to the knowledge, skills, and affect/motivation that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments. Cross-cultural competence is defined here as an individual capability that contributes to intercultural effectiveness regardless of the particular intersection of cultures. Although some aspects of cognition, behavior, or affect may be particularly relevant in a specific country or region, evidence suggests that a core set of competencies enables adaptation to any culture (Hammer, 1987). Cross-cultural competence is not an end in itself, but is a set of variables that contribute to intercultural effectiveness. Whereas previous models have tended to emphasize subjective outcomes, by focusing primarily on adjustment, outcomes of interest here include both subjective and objective outcomes. Objective outcomes, such as job performance, have been addressed in previous research, but to a lesser degree than the subjective outcomes. Research indicates that the outcomes are linked, with personal and interpersonal adjustment linked to work adjustment, which has in turn been linked with job performance (Shay & Baack, 2006). However, these relationships are small, and some research has demonstrated that subjective outcomes can diverge from objective outcomes (Kealey, 1989), with expatriates sometimes showing relatively poor adjustment but high effectiveness in their organizational role.
Views: 553 The Audiopedia
Engagement is the Answer! Cross-Cultural Lessons in Life and Psychology | Laura Johnson | TEDxUM
 
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In a global, multicultural world, Dr. Laura R. Johnson claims that everyday interactions are cross-cultural and that positive engagement is the answer to a peaceful society. Laura shares tips for the viewer’s own cross-cultural journey by offering intriguing images and stories from her life and work in international psychology. From being mistaken for a dead person, to collaborating with traditional healers, and working with refugees, Laura illuminates the stunning bias in psychology and encourages us to connect, care and collaborate with others. Dr. Laura R. Johnson is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Mississippi where she mentors PhD students, teaches multicultural, environmental and clinical psychology, intercultural communication, human sexuality and study abroad in Tanzania. Laura’s research is transnational, spanning cultural, conservation and peace psychology with a focus on positive youth development and community participation. Laura received two US Fulbright grants and two National Geographic Conservation Trust grants for research with East African youth and an Institute of International Education grant to provide intercultural training to US students. She has published book chapters and journal articles in cultural competence, cultural issues in children, international students, youth development, ethnopolitical conflict, and environmental action. Laura was an international student in Kenya and Peace Corps volunteer in Papua New Guinea before completing a PhD at the University of Louisville. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 3016 TEDx Talks
What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WANT VIDEO LIKE THIS ONE? ORDER IT HERE FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS - http://bit.ly/2Uxpg5X ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean? CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION definition - CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cross-cultural communication is a field of study that looks at how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate, in similar and different ways among themselves, and how they endeavour to communicate across cultures. Intercultural communication is a related field of study. During the Cold War, the economy of the United States was largely self-contained because the world was polarized into two separate and competing powers: the East and the West. However, changes and advancements in economic relationships, political systems, and technological options began to break down old cultural barriers. Business transformed from individual-country capitalism to global capitalism. Thus, the study of cross-cultural communication was originally found within businesses and government, both seeking to expand globally. Businesses began to offer language training to their employees and programs were developed to train employees to understand how to act when abroad. With this also came the development of the Foreign Service Institute, or FSI, through the Foreign Service Act of 1946, where government employees received trainings and prepared for overseas posts. There began also implementation of a “world view” perspective in the curriculum of higher education. In 1974, the International Progress Organization, with the support of UNESCO and under the auspices of Senegalese President Léopold Sédar Senghor, held an international conference on "The Cultural Self-comprehension of Nations" (Innsbruck, Austria, 27–29 July 1974) which called upon United Nations member states "to organize systematic and global comparative research on the different cultures of the world" and "to make all possible efforts for a more intensive training of diplomats in the field of international cultural co-operation ... and to develop the cultural aspects of their foreign policy." In the past decade, there has become an increasing pressure for universities across the world to incorporate intercultural and international understanding and knowledge into the education of their students. International literacy and cross-cultural understanding have become critical to a country’s cultural, technological, economic, and political health. It has become essential for universities to educate, or more importantly, “transform”, to function effectively and comfortably in a world characterized by close, multi-faceted relationships and permeable borders. Students must possess a certain level of global competence to understand the world they live in and how they fit into this world. This level of global competence starts at ground level- the university and its faculty- with how they generate and transmit cross-cultural knowledge and information to students. Cross-cultural communication endeavours to bring together such relatively unrelated areas as cultural anthropology and established areas of communication. Its core is to establish and understand how people from different cultures communicate with each other. Its charge is to also produce some guidelines with which people from different cultures can better communicate with each other. Cross-cultural communication, as with many scholarly fields, is a combination of many other fields. These fields include anthropology, cultural studies, psychology and communication. The field has also moved both toward the treatment of interethnic relations, and toward the study of communication strategies used by co-cultural populations, i.e., communication strategies used to deal with majority or mainstream populations. The study of languages other than one's own can serve not only to help one understand what we as humans have in common, but also to assist in the understanding of the diversity which underlines our languages' methods of constructing and organizing knowledge. Such understanding has profound implications with respect to developing a critical awareness of social relationships. Understanding social relationships and the way other cultures work is the groundwork of successful globalization business affairs.
Views: 27131 The Audiopedia
Germany’s Cross-Cultural Music Scene
 
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The German music scene is diverse. And there are plenty of musicians who come to Germany from elsewhere to pursue their passion. Like David Lemaitre from Bolivia and Kat Frankie from Australia. https://www.deutschland.de/en/topic/culture
Views: 1214 DEUTSCHLAND.de
Cultural Differences In Negotiations
 
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This video was made by: Bert Appels Sébastien Devos Sven Goesaert Julien Gombert References: http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/culture-negotiation LeBaron, Michelle. "Culture-Based Negotiation Styles." Beyond Intractability. Eds. Guy Burgess and Heidi Burgess. Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado, Boulder. Posted: July 2003 (http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/culture-negotiation). http://www.edgenegotiation.com/2009/12/cultural-impact-on-negotiation/ http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic551848.files/Park%20and%20Kim.pdf http://www.businessinsider.com/how-different-cultures-understand-time-2014-5?IR=T http://www.tcworld.info/e-magazine/business-culture/article/east-meets-west-negotiating-interculturally/ http://iveybusinessjournal.com/publication/negotiating-the-top-ten-ways-that-culture-can-affect-your-negotiation/
Views: 5375 Sven Goesaert
What is Cross-cultural psychology?, Explain Cross-cultural psychology
 
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~~~ Cross-cultural psychology ~~~ Title: What is Cross-cultural psychology?, Explain Cross-cultural psychology Created on: 2018-09-25 Source Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-cultural_psychology ------ Description: Cross-cultural psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including both their variability and invariance, under diverse cultural conditions. Through expanding research methodologies to recognize cultural variance in behavior, language, and meaning it seeks to extend and develop psychology. Since psychology as an academic discipline was developed largely in North America and Europe, some psychologists became concerned that constructs accepted as universal were not as invariant as previously assumed, especially since many attempts to replicate notable experiments in other cultures had varying success. Since there are questions as to whether theories dealing with central themes, such as affect, cognition, conceptions of the self, and issues such as psychopathology, anxiety, and depression, may lack external validity when "exported" to other cultural contexts, cross-cultural psychology re-examines them using methodologies designed to factor in cultural differences so as to account for cultural variance. Although some critics have pointed to methodological flaws in cross-cultural psychological research and claim that serious shortcomings in the theoretical and methodological bases used impede rather than help the scientific search for universal principles in psychology, cross-cultural psychologists are turning more to the study of how differences occur, rather than searching for universals in the style of physics or chemistry.While cross-cultural psychology represented only a minor area of psychology prior to WWII, it began to grow in importance during the 1960s. In 1971, the interdisciplinary Society for Cross-Cultural Research was founded, and in 1972 the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology was established. Since then, this branch of psychology has continued to expand as there has been an increasing popularity of incorporating culture and diversity into studies of numerous psychological phenomena. Cross-cultural psychology is differentiated from cultural psychology, which refers to the branch of psychology that holds that human behavior is strongly influenced by cultural differences, meaning that psychological phenomena can only be compared with each other across cultures to a limited extent. In contrast, cross-cultural psychology includes a search for possible universals in behavior and mental processes. Cross-cultural psychology "can be thought of as a type research methodology, rather than an entirely separate field within psychology". In addition, cross-cultural psychology can be distinguished from international psychology which centers around the global expansion of psychology especially during recent decades. Nevertheless, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and international psychology are united by a common concern for expanding psychology into a universal discipline capable of understanding psychological phenomena across cultures and in a global context. ------ To see your favorite topic here, fill out this request form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScU0dLbeWsc01IC0AaO8sgaSgxMFtvBL31c_pjnwEZUiq99Fw/viewform ------ Source: Wikipedia.org articles, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Support: Donations can be made from https://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Ways_to_Give to support Wikimedia Foundation and knowledge sharing.
Views: 732 Audioversity
What is CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY? What does CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY mean?
 
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What is CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY? What does CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY mean? CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY meaning - CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY definition - CROSS CULTURAL SENSITIVITY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ?sub_confirmation=1 Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cross cultural sensitivity is the knowledge, awareness, and acceptance of other cultures. On the individual level, it allows travelers and workers to successfully navigate a different culture that they are interacting with whereas it is considered one of the primary factors that drive the way organizations behave. Support of cultural sensitivity is based on ideological or practical considerations. Former Secretary-General of the United Nations Kofi Annan advocates cultural sensitivity as an essential value in the modern world: Tolerance, inter-cultural dialogue and respect for diversity are more essential than ever in a world where people are becoming more and more closely interconnected.Kofi Annan, Former Secretary-General of the United Nations —  Cultural sensitivity can increase the security of travellers because it helps them see things from the other person's perspective. Lacking awareness of foreign cultures can also have adverse legal consequences. There are, for example etiquettes in a country that are considered violations of business codes in another. For workers, this cross-cultural sensitivity can lead to competitiveness and success when working with or within organizations located in a different country. Experts stressed that this is a prime requisite for the satisfied expatriate. These benefits are highlighted in the way this concept is defined. It is concerned with the consideration of how two societies and cultures operate, particularly with respect to how they are similar and different from each other. Being able to determine these in terms of thoughts, behavior, beliefs, and expressions among others makes it possible to solve problems meaningfully and act in a manner that is acceptable to all stakeholders. Cultural sensitivity can have positive effects in academia. In 2002 Unity College, Murray Bridge, began a Student Exchange Program with Chuo University Suginami High School in Tokyo, Japan. This program has been successful because of the both schools' focus on cross cultural awareness. Cultural sensitivity training in health care providers can improve the satisfaction and health outcomes of patients from different minority groups.
Views: 373 The Audiopedia
What is CULTURAL TRANSLATION? What does CULTURAL TRANSLATION mean?
 
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What is CULTURAL TRANSLATION? What does CULTURAL TRANSLATION mean? CULTURAL TRANSLATION meaning - CULTURAL TRANSLATION definition - CULTURAL TRANSLATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cultural translation represents the practice of translation, which involves cultural differences. Cultural translation can be also defined as a practice whose aim is to present another culture via translation. This kind of translation solves some issues linked to culture, such as dialects, food or architecture. The main issue that cultural translation must solve consists in translating a text as showing cultural differences of this text, in respecting the source culture. Cultural translation is a term which must be also studied through cultural anthropology, a field of anthropology focused on cultural issues among humans. This discipline questions translation through cultural differences. Indeed, translation studies are not only based on language issues, but also on cultural contexts between peoples. An anthropological translator of cultures needs to deal with the issues between the source and the target language, that is to say he must respect at the same time the cultural source of point of view and the target culture. Wilhelm von Humboldt shared this opinion of translation in a letter addressed to A.W.Schlegel, dated July 23, 1796: “All translation seems to me simply an attempt to solve an impossible task. Every translator is doomed to be done in by one of two stumbling blocks: he will either stay too close to the original, at the cost of taste and the language of his nation, or he will adhere too closely to the characteristics peculiar to his nation, at the cost of the original. The medium between the two is not only difficult, but downright impossible” since “…despite the fact that translation brings cultures nearer, in each translation, there will be a definite deformation between cultures." Some anthropologists raise objections to translation of cultures. According to these researchers, culture seeks a certain coherence that can be found in people’s thinking and practices. In this case, a cultural translator must have a much more widespread knowledge than the text actually provides. Besides, translation of cultures cannot be as equal as it should be, as some cultures and societies remain dominant compared to others, therefore power is a limit to translation of cultures. Indeed, within a translation of cultures, the target language may dominate the source culture in order to make the text comprehensible in a sense of culture for the readers. The meaning of culture is quite difficult to understand, therefore translation of cultures is certainly limited, all the more so borders exist between cultures, which must be thus distinguished. This limit of translation of cultures was also explained in the theory of Edward Sapir, an American linguist and anthropologist : “The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached”. “Each linguistic community has its own perception of the world, which differs from that of other linguistic communities, implies the existence of different worlds determined by language”. Some linguists assume that untranslatability doesn’t only come from linguistic limits but also from cultural barriers within translation. According to some linguists, such as C.L. Wren, differences of point of view between peoples relatively impose narrow limits to cultural translatability. The theory of universal translatability is therefore disapproved by some researchers, like André Martinet, who is convinced that human experience cannot be well communicated because it is unique. Catford rationalised this theory in his book "Linguistic Theory of Translation" : "Cultural untranslatability arises when a situational feature, functionally relevant for the source language text, is completely absent from the culture of which the TL is a part". For instance, the names of some institutions, clothes, foods and abstract concepts, amongst others." Anton Popovič also assumes that there is a difference between linguistic and cultural untranslatability, an idea that he defends in “A Dictionary for the Analysis of Literary Translation” : “A situation in which the linguistic elements of the original cannot be replaced adequately in structural, linear, functional or semantic terms in consequence of a lack of denotation or connotation”.-....
Views: 4285 The Audiopedia
Cross cultural adaptation of outcome measures :A solution or a problem
 
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Link to article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rehab.2019.01.006
What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY mean? CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY definition - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cross-cultural psychiatry, transcultural psychiatry, or cultural psychiatry is a branch of psychiatry concerned with the cultural context of mental disorders and the challenges of addressing ethnic diversity in psychiatric services. It emerged as a coherent field from several strands of work, including surveys of the prevalence and form of disorders in different cultures or countries; the study of migrant populations and ethnic diversity within countries; and analysis of psychiatry itself as a cultural product. The early literature was associated with colonialism and with observations by asylum psychiatrists or anthropologists who tended to assume the universal applicability of Western psychiatric diagnostic categories. A seminal paper by Arthur Kleinman in 1977 followed by a renewed dialogue between anthropology and psychiatry, is seen as having heralded a "new cross-cultural psychiatry". However, Kleinman later pointed out that culture often became incorporated in only superficial ways, and that for example 90% of DSM-IV categories are culture-bound to North America and Western Europe, and yet the "culture-bound syndrome" label is only applied to "exotic" conditions outside Euro-American society. It is argued that a cultural perspective can help psychiatrists become aware of the hidden assumptions and limitations of current psychiatric theory and practice and can identify new approaches appropriate for treating the increasingly diverse populations seen in psychiatric services around the world. The recent revision of the nosology of the American Psychiatric Association, DSM-5, includes a Cultural Formulation Interview that aims to help clinicians contextualize diagnostic assessment. A related approach to cultural assessment involves cultural consultation which works with interpreters and cultural brokers to develop a cultural formulation and treatment plan that can assist clinicians. Cultural psychiatry looks at whether psychiatric classifications of disorders are appropriate to different cultures or ethnic groups. It often argues that psychiatric illnesses represent social constructs as well as genuine medical conditions, and as such have social uses peculiar to the social groups in which they are created and legitimized. It studies psychiatric classifications in different cultures, whether informal (e.g. category terms used in different languages) or formal (for example the World Health Organization's ICD, the American Psychiatric Association's DSM, or the Chinese Society of Psychiatry's CCMD). The field has increasingly had to address the process of globalization. It is said every city has a different culture and that the urban environment, and how people adapt or struggle to adapt to it, can play a crucial role in the onset or worsening of mental illness. However, some scholars developing an anthropology of mental illness (Lézé, 2014) consider that attention to culture is not enough if it is decontextualized from historical events, and history in more general sense. An historical and politically informed perspective can counteract some of the risks related to promoting universalized 'global mental health' programs as well as the increasing hegemony of diagnostic categories such as PTSD (Didier Fassin and Richard Rechtman analyze this issue in their book 'The Empire of Trauma'). Roberto Beneduce, who devoted many years to research and clinical practice in West Africa (Mali, among the Dogon) and in Italy with migrants, strongly emphasizes this shift. Inspired by the thought of Frantz Fanon, Beneduce points to forms of historical consciousness and selfhood as well as history-related suffering as central dimensions of a 'critical ethnopsychiatry' or 'critical transcultural psychiatry'.
Views: 586 The Audiopedia
What is CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL? What does CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL? What does CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL mean? CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL definition - CROSS-CULTURAL CAPITAL explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In management and organizational studies disciplines, cross-cultural capital (CCC) is the aggregate set of knowledge, skills, abilities and psychological dispositions that gives individuals competitive advantage in interacting, working, and managing in culturally diverse environments. It is considered a facet of human capital. Cross-cultural capital is conceived as a broad construct and it is composed of both dispositional (or, more trait-like) and experience-based elements (more statelike), including personality dispositions (e.g., openness to experience), values and beliefs (e.g.,pro-diversity beliefs), cognitive style (cognitive flexibility) and acquired specific skills (e.g., mastery of several languages) as well as of relevant experiences (e.g., traveling, living and working in different countries; growing up in a multicultural environment). Some scholars include cultural intelligence (CQ) as one of the state-like components of cross-cultural capital. This corresponds to Ang and Van Dyne's (2008) nomological network of cultural intelligence model, where cultural intelligence is conceptualized as a more of state-like construct that mediates distal factors, which are typified as trait-like (e.g., personality traits) and intermediate constructs such as communication apprehension and anxiety, which, in turn, are postulated to affect a host of individual and interpersonal outcomes that can be broadly classified into performance and cultural adaptation.
Views: 8 The Audiopedia
Cross-cultural studies
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Cross-cultural studies, sometimes called holocultural studies or comparative studies, is a specialization in anthropology and sister sciences that uses field data from many societies to examine the scope of human behavior and test hypotheses about human behavior and culture.Cross-cultural studies is the third form of cross-cultural comparisons.The first is comparison of case studies, the second is controlled comparison among variants of a common derivation, and the third is comparison within a sample of cases.Unlike comparative studies, which examines similar characteristics of a few societies, cross-cultural studies uses a sufficiently large sample so that statistical analysis can be made to show relationships or lack of relationships between the traits in question. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 467 WikiWikiup
Four Characteristics of Successful Clients in Cross-Cultural Coaching
 
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Who I work with part 2 Follow me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/authenticjourneys Transcript of Video: Profiles of successful clients who work with me, by Jennifer Kumar, Cross-Cultural Coach. Characteristics of the most successful clients who worked with me are: The world is a puzzle we can put together! Inspiring individuals open to new ideas and new ways of thinking and approaching situations to bridge "cultural divides" are ideal for cross-cultural mentoring. In the process of helping you sort things out, we do a lot of brainstorming and testing out ideas. Together, we collect a lot of ideas, helping you think and choose the best ones that suit you. From these ideas, we create goals, action plans and a schedule of accountability to help you to realize success. Self-driven and motivated for success and self-improvement. Though I am always in your corner, your best cheerleader, I know you are the one who's responsible for your life. I respect that you will make the best decisions for yourself and be able to initiate your action plans, realize your own goals and ultimately be responsible for your success. Not afraid to try something different, new and possibly uncomfortable to create success and comfort abroad. When we try new things in a new environment, we have to be willing to 'look a little foolish'. Think about little kids learning to walk and talk. They take so many risks to walk and talk. They make a lot of mistakes, but they don't let it get them down. They keep trying until they can walk and talk like the rest of us. They aren't afraid to look foolish and keep trying even after 'failures' to be successful. When we come into a new culture, parts of us become like 'little kids'. We have to learn new things that may be- well often are- uncomfortable. These new things make us feel off-balance, maybe even inadequate, and like a kid again. It's both refreshing and scary to be in this position. These are the times of life that are turning points. I am here to help you keep on track so that you can keep moving forward; making the discomfort of cultural adjustment feel natural and new behaviors not feel so awkward but like second nature. Respectful of themselves. Respectful of me. Respectful of the process. Going through the process of cultural adjustment can be rewarding, but it can also be extremely challenging on many fronts- physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. It's a test of our resilience and our strength. It brings out our best and sometimes, our worst qualities. It can help us 'feel' life more intensely than we ever have before. Since we experience such a range of emotions during this transition, we can be hard on ourselves and others. Having respect for yourself- learning to understand your strengths and limitations is imperative. Respecting ourselves radiates out respect for those close to us, others and the experiences that we live through. Sometimes we want overnight success; but this is not usually possible. It takes time; there is a process to every 'overnight success'. Coaching with me, you can take part in the 'Life Purpose Process'- a seven step process that helps you take inventory of different aspects of your life to create harmony and peace with your surroundings and within yourself. When we become gentler on ourselves, things can come with more ease than we ever imagined. I have also experienced this myself being coached through the Life Purpose Process and I am honored to share this with you! Thank you for reading this article. More articles: Part 1 of this article. Who I Work With (Part 1: Characteristics of Those Interested in Cross-Cultural Mentoring with me.) http://www.facebook.com/#!/note.php?note_id=176822575670137 Client Testimonials http://authenticjourneys.blo­gspot.com/search/label/%22client%20testi­monials%22 How to Find and Hire a Cross-Cultural Coach http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=174310932587968 ==article concluded== Jennifer Kumar, CC, Cross Cultural Coach Author of this article, Jennifer Kumar, CC, is a life expat coach helping people living their best lives anywhere they relocate in the world! If you're looking for help navigating cross-cultural, multicultural, overseas, interfaith and global lifestyles, Follow me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/authenticjourneys
Views: 515 Jen Kumar
Cross Cultural - Accenture BeLux
 
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As members of one global network, serving clients in 120 countries, Accenture people collaborate across geographical and cultural frontiers. We learn to appreciate and understand the diversity of business cultures across the globe. Closer to home, we value the cultural diversity of our local colleagues, which reflects the society in which we operate. Find out more: https://www.accenture-insights.be/en-us/articles/inclusion-diversity
Views: 209 accenturebelux
Cross-cultural psychology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Cross-cultural psychology 00:02:59 1 Definitions and early work 00:04:57 2 Etic v. emic perspectives 00:06:15 3 Research and applications 00:06:24 3.1 Geert Hofstede and the dimensions of culture 00:07:55 3.2 Counseling and clinical psychology 00:09:57 3.3 Five-factor model of personality 00:11:04 3.4 Emotion judgments 00:13:11 3.5 Differences in subjective well-being 00:15:18 3.6 How different cultures resolve conflict 00:17:35 3.7 Gender-role and gender-identity differences and similarities 00:18:34 3.8 Cross-cultural human development 00:20:34 4 Future developments 00:21:16 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Cross-cultural psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including both their variability and invariance, under diverse cultural conditions. Through expanding research methodologies to recognize cultural variance in behavior, language, and meaning it seeks to extend and develop psychology. Since psychology as an academic discipline was developed largely in North America and Europe, some psychologists became concerned that constructs accepted as universal were not as invariant as previously assumed, especially since many attempts to replicate notable experiments in other cultures had varying success. Since there are questions as to whether theories dealing with central themes, such as affect, cognition, conceptions of the self, and issues such as psychopathology, anxiety, and depression, may lack external validity when "exported" to other cultural contexts, cross-cultural psychology re-examines them using methodologies designed to factor in cultural differences so as to account for cultural variance. Although some critics have pointed to methodological flaws in cross-cultural psychological research and claim that serious shortcomings in the theoretical and methodological bases used impede rather than help the scientific search for universal principles in psychology, cross-cultural psychologists are turning more to the study of how differences (variance) occur, rather than searching for universals in the style of physics or chemistry.While cross-cultural psychology represented only a minor area of psychology prior to WWII, it began to grow in importance during the 1960s. In 1971, the interdisciplinary Society for Cross-Cultural Research (SCCR) was founded, and in 1972 the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP) was established. Since then, this branch of psychology has continued to expand as there has been an increasing popularity of incorporating culture and diversity into studies of numerous psychological phenomena. Cross-cultural psychology is differentiated from cultural psychology, which refers to the branch of psychology that holds that human behavior is strongly influenced by cultural differences, meaning that psychological phenomena can only be compared with each other across cultures to a limited extent. In contrast, cross-cultural psychology includes a search for possible universals in behavior and mental processes. Cross-cultural psychology "can be thought of as a type [of] research methodology, rather than an entirely separate field within psychology". In addition, cross-cultural psychology can be distinguished from international psychology which centers around the global expansion of psychology especially during recent decades. Nevertheless, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and international psychology are united by a common concern for expanding psychology into a universal discipline capable of understanding psychological phenomena across cultures and in a global context.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Cross-cultural psychology
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Cross-cultural psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including both their variability and invariance, under diverse cultural conditions.Through expanding research methodologies to recognize cultural variance in behavior, language, and meaning it seeks to extend and develop psychology.Since psychology as an academic discipline was developed largely in North America and Europe, some psychologists became concerned that constructs accepted as universal were not as invariant as previously assumed, especially since many attempts to replicate notable experiments in other cultures had varying success.Since there are questions as to whether theories dealing with central themes, such as affect, cognition, conceptions of the self, and issues such as psychopathology, anxiety, and depression, may lack external validity when "exported" to other cultural contexts, cross-cultural psychology re-examines them using methodologies designed to factor in cultural differences so as to account for cultural variance. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 1816 WikiWikiup
Muslims in Terrorism News Coverage: A Cross Cultural Content Analysis
 
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To gain an understanding of how Muslims were represented in the news during the immediate aftermath of the Paris terror attacks, this study applied an eclectic lens to the method of content analysis. The study built on existing research by content analyzing coverage of the attacks in The New York Times and The Guardian. A second coder was adopted and 40 random articles were analyzed for headline bias, source usage, value statements and three word clusters surrounding Muslims, Islam and refugees. A word map was created to gain an understanding of the frequently used words in both outlets. The results showed that the headlines were neutral and that Muslims were portrayed more positively in The Guardian. Both outlets relied heavily on non-Muslim sources in their stories, and Islam was frequently placed in negative word clusters. The word maps suggests two different agendas in the two media outlets. The results were discussed and considered in terms of Nossek’s (2008) “News-Media” Media Events Model and previous research findings.
Views: 44 Lars Lindtner
Daily Living in a Cross Cultural Setting
 
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Please visit http://www.authenticjourneys.info/2012/02/communication-in-intercultural-setting.html for the accompanying article.
Views: 163 Amritsari Pepper
Universal Sounds: Cross Cultural Communication | Teny Avakian | TEDxYSMU
 
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What is the power of Universal Sound? Exploring Universal Sounds based on real life stories and how this reflect on our daily lives. Teny Avakian was born in Tehran, Iran. At the age of 4, her family moved to Boston, USA.And then, at the age of 13, she moved to Armenia for the first time. She graduated from Yerevan State University with a B.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy. For her graduate studies she then moved to Lebanon and France where she studied for degrees in International Relations from the American Graduate School of Paris and the Lebanese American University.Teny repatriated to Armenia for the second time in 2010 and started her career working extensively as a marketing professional in the private sector for an array of technological companies. In June 2014, she decided to leave the private sector and join Teach For Armenia Educational Foundation as the Director of Recruitment and Selection.Joining Teach For Armenia has made Teny enthusiastic about dedicating her time, knowledge, and experience towards an initiative which will significantly impact the future of each and every child in Armenia. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 11836 TEDx Talks
Educational Systems: Tacit Knowledge and Effective Cross-Cultural Communication.m4v
 
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NCSU international student community shares their unique experience about differences between the US and the educational systems within which they studied in their home countries.
Views: 744 OIS at NCSU
Living in Costa Rica - Cultural differences.
 
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Exploring cultural differences with cross cultural expert Eric Liljenstolpe. ee the full article at: [ http://www.welovecostarica.com/members/2206.cfm ] Distributed by Tubemogul.
Views: 9379 WeLoveCostaRica.com
Episode 9: Cross-Cultural Romance
 
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Caught the love bug for an exotic foreigner? You’re not alone! The number of cross-cultural relationships has been rising as the world grows more and more connected. This week Rachel and Patrice talk cross-cultural love and romance. We explore areas where there can be problems (like visa issues and language barriers) as well as tips for making sure everyone feels loved and on the same page. For more stats on the rise of cross-cultural marriages, here’s the article we referenced from The Economist: https://www.economist.com/node/21538103 In Language News, you’re not crazy for hearing “Laurel” or “Yanny.” The reasons for it have to do, at least in part, with the shape of your ears and your linguistic background. Check out this article from the Atlantic for a more in-depth explanation: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/05/dont-rest-on-your-laurels/560483/ Thanks a million to Brian in South Korea, who sent us his Lost in Translation moments from limited Korean. To check out his podcast on Korean baseball, go visit Grand Slam KBO! Are you, or have you been in a relationship with somebody with a cultural background that’s different from yours? Let us know in the comments! We would love to hear your input — do you have any more advice?
Cross-Cultural Issues in Recovery from Addiction with Dr. Bob Weathers
 
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Emphasizes that successful treatment for addiction for many ethnic groups must encompass cultural sensitivity to more traditional values. These include: an appreciation for spirituality, a greater focus on relationships, e.g., within the family, and increased importance placed on the intergenerational transmission of core cultural values. A highly regarded educator and university administrator, as well as recovery coach, author, and public speaker, Dr. Bob Weathers holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology, with an M.A. in religious studies. Over the course of his professional career, “Dr. Bob” has provided tens of thousands of hours of therapeutic counseling and recovery coaching to satisfied clients. He has also committed the past 35 years to teaching, training, and inspiring graduate-level mental health providers at several southern California universities, most recently at California Southern University. Dr. Bob is currently academic effectiveness coordinator at CalSouthern, engaged full-time in ongoing initiatives for improving the educational experience of our learners, including his chairing the brand-new Student Advisory Council. Additionally, Dr. Bob has published numerous articles in a broad cross-section of respected professional reference books, journals, and edited volumes. To learn more about the speaker, visit: http://www.drbobweathers.com To learn more please visit: http://www.calsouthern.edu/psychology
Strassburger SJ's "The Deep Dive of Cross-Cultural Immersion"
 
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Adapting to a new language and culture can be isolating and disorienting. Brian Strassburger, S.J. reflects on life and work abroad. Read the complete article at: https://thejesuitpost.org/2017/08/cross-cultural-immersion/ Video Credits: Brian Strassburger, SJ Edited by: Michael A. Martínez, SJ Music Licensed by Audio Network Limited
Views: 175 The Jesuit Post
What Are The Cross Cultural Issues?
 
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"WATCH What Are The Cross Cultural Issues LIST OF RELATED VIDEOS OF What Are The Cross Cultural Issues IN THIS CHANNEL : What Are The Cross Cultural Issues? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGP6VzDBIVQ How Much Does A CMO Make A Year? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rieAUa8Pmto How Much Do You Make In Investor Relations? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVxk5pndqfQ How Much Does A VP Of Communications Make? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w0egwGMaRg How Much Does Adsense Pay Per Click? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-sEV-3QA1w What Are The Basic Functions Of Public Relations? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLalG-L9je4 What Are Cross Cultural Communication? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98NnX_SPNgU How Much Does A Relationship Manager Make At A Bank? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIqkVuyosxA Is All Publicity Free? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1bBkro1OgA What Are Online Public Relations? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BRRRKz0-2M"
Views: 233 sparky Facts
What is CULTURAL CONFLICT? What does CULTURAL CONFLICT mean? CULTURAL CONFLICT meaning & explanation
 
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What is CULTURAL CONFLICT? What does CULTURAL CONFLICT mean? CULTURAL CONFLICT meaning - CULTURAL CONFLICT definition - CULTURAL CONFLICT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cultural conflict is a type of conflict that occurs when different cultural values and beliefs clash. It has been used to explain violence and crime. Jonathan H. Turner defines it as a conflict caused by "differences in cultural values and beliefs that place people at odds with one another". On a micro level, Alexander Grewe discusses a cultural conflict between guests of different culture and nationality as seen in a British 1970 sitcom, Fawlty Towers. He defines this conflict as one that occurs when people's expectations of a certain behavior coming from their cultural backgrounds are not met, as others have different cultural backgrounds and different expectations. Cultural conflicts are difficult to resolve as parties to the conflict have different beliefs. Cultural conflicts intensify when those differences become reflected in politics, particularly on a macro level. An example of cultural conflict is the debate over abortion. Ethnic cleansing is another extreme example of cultural conflict. Wars can also be a result of a cultural conflict; for example the differing views on slavery were one of the reasons for the American civil war. A more narrow definition of a cultural conflict dates to Daniel Bell's 1962 essay, "Crime as an American Way of Life", and focuses on criminal-enabling consequences of a clash in cultural values. William Kornblum defines it as a conflict that occurs when conflicting norms create "opportunities for deviance and criminal gain in deviant sub-cultures". Kornblum notes that whenever laws impose cultural values on a group that does not share those views (often, this is the case of the majority imposing their laws on a minority), illegal markets supplied by criminals are created to circumvent those laws. He discusses the example of prohibition in the interbellum United States, and notes how the cultural conflict between pro- and anti-alcohol groups created opportunities for illegal activity; another similar example he lists is that of the war on drugs. Kornblum also classifies the cultural conflict as one of the major types of conflict theory. In The Clash of Civilizations Samuel P. Huntington proposes that people's cultural and religious identities will be the primary source of conflict in the post-Cold War world. Michelle LeBaron describes different cultures as "underground rivers that run through our lives and relationships, giving us messages that shape our perceptions, attributions, judgments, and ideas of self and other". She states that cultural messages "shape our understandings" when two or more people are present in regards to relationships, conflict, and peace. LeBaron discusses the influence of culture as being powerful and "unconscious, influencing conflict and attempts to resolve conflict in imperceptible ways". She states that the impact of culture is huge, affecting "name, frame, blame, and attempt to tame conflicts". Due to the huge impact that culture has on us, LeBaron finds it important to explain the "complications of conflict". First, "culture is multi-layered", meaning that "what you see on the surface may mask differences below the surface". Second, "culture is constantly in flux", meaning that "cultural groups adapt in dynamic and sometimes unpredictable ways". Third, "culture is elastic", meaning that one member of a cultural group may not participate in the norms of the culture. Lastly, "culture is largely below the surface", meaning that it isn't easy to reach the deeper levels of culture and its meanings.
Views: 6237 The Audiopedia
Cross Cultural Relationships: 4 Ingredients for a Successful Intercultural Love Story
 
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Are you experiencing the confusing complexities of an intercultural relationship? Here are 4 important thoughts that can make life a lot easier for you! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SUBSCRIBE & FIND ME BELOW FOR MORE FUN TIMES ✌ 📷See more of my daily life on Instagram: _notevenfrench 🐸JOIN THE FRANCOPHILES on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2HAC3uG 💎SHOP NOW at Francophile Designs: https://rdbl.co/2qxn6Ce ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bicultural relationships, cross cultural relationships, intercultural relationships, interracial relationships, whatever you want to call them, can be tough! Romantic relationships are an essential part of human experience. As the world becomes more integrated, people from different cultural backgrounds and traditions unavoidably meet and fall in love. An understanding of the role that culture plays in how we fall in love and stay in love is not only relevant, but also necessary in promoting healthy development of romantic relationships. Cross-cultural romantic relationships refer to romantic relationships across national boundaries, such as romantic relationships in China and the United States. To make it harder, there are also their expectations, like for instance, whether both of you plan to get married or not, and if so, in which country? How many children will you have? Will you live abroad? What side of the family will you live closest to? How will you access visas? The thing with multicultural couples is that you need to be twice as conscious about the things you do and say in your relationship. You need to be twice as curious about their background, twice as explicit in communication, twice as careful about checking on each other's expectations... the list goes on. We couldn't possibly tackle the complexity of cross-cultural relationships in just one video but we hope to start the conversation at least. Are you in an intercultural marriage or relationship? What would your advice be to others in the same situation? By the way, I would highly recommend checking out the Youtube Channel Dating Beyond Borders, very funny: https://bit.ly/29rBSDc ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VIDEO NOTES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FREE STUFF AirBnB travel credit (25€ or equivalent): http://bit.ly/2yTkCAH LIFE IN FRANCE BOOKS * Best French Grammar book that I've found: http://amzn.to/2g511py * Best on French parenting, Bringing up bébé: http://amzn.to/2xORnz1 * Best on multicultural workplaces: http://amzn.to/2fEU9hQ * Favourite fiction read, Almost French: http://amzn.to/2xOdbKZ MY CAMERA: https://amzn.to/2H0m3oF MY DRONE: https://amzn.to/2rhIzP6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ You can join me, Rosie, for even more adventures on Not Even French! If you are interested in French culture, life in Paris, or tales from a New Zealander (kiwi) living a long way from home, please ❤SUBSCRIBE❤ for new videos released each WEDNESDAY! ✌✌ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TAGS: multicultural couples, mixed race couples, intercultural relationships, interracial marriage, interracial dating, interracial couples, intercultural marriage, cross cultural relationships, cross cultural dating relationships, cross cultural romantic relationships, cross cultural differences in relationships, cross-cultural mentoring relationships, dating different cultures, dating different races, bicultural relationships, dating someone from another country
Views: 13449 Not Even French
CARTA: Awareness of Death and Mortality: Death as Celebration: Cross-Cultural Perspectives
 
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1:41 START OF PRESENTATION (Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Rita Astuti looks at different cultures and how death is imbued with complex meaning and transformed from an ending to a beginning, and from a cause for despair, to a celebration. Recorded on 03/03/2017. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 32055]
8  Cross Cultural Missions
 
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8. Cross Cultural Missions (3Q 2015—Missionaries) http://www.sabbathschoolonthemove.org/articles/1565 For August 22, 2015
Views: 118 Jonathan Gallagher
Cross-Cultural Cuisine: Brazil - Brigadeiros
 
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This video features the Brigadeiros as a part of the Brazilian Cross-Cultural article featured in the Northern Student. For more videos, like and subscribe to the Northern Student page. For stories about Bemidji State University, check out: www.northernstudentonline.com Music: We Are One by Vexento https://www.youtube.com/user/Vexento https://soundcloud.com/vexento Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/Ssvu2yncgWU
Cross-Cultural Cuisine: Brazil - Coxinha de Frango
 
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This video features the Coxinha de Frango as a part of the Brazilian Cross-Cultural article featured in the Northern Student. For more videos, like and subscribe to the Northern Student page. For stories about Bemidji State University, check out: www.northernstudentonline.com Music: Vibe With Me by Joakim Karud http://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/-7YDBIGCXsY
Beijing to Berlin Pt. 1- Dj Zhao's music of cross-cultural revolution, Africa and communism
 
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Pictured above: Dj Zhao in concert, showing us how all music seamlessly connects humanity, Africa and politics. Source article with all the images and hyperlinks: pending Much more at www.chinarising.puntopress.com, http://chinarising.puntopress.com/2017/05/19/the-china-trilogy/ and http://apps.monk.ee/tyrion
Views: 185 Jeff J. Brown
Cross cultural weaning in a South African context Part 1
 
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As all moms know, one of the largest determinants of whether a mom breast feeds successfully, and how a mom breast feeds, is the support that she receives from those around her – something largely determined by culture. See similar articles here: http://tiny.cc/iacstx
Views: 67 Braun South Africa
Cross-cultural Issues in Consumption Ethics - An interview with Dr Peter Luetchford
 
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Dr Peter Luetchford, Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Sussex, attended as a guest speaker at the Cross-cultural Issues in Consumption Ethics seminar on 14 January 2016 and spoke about ‘A Problem with Pizza: Reflections on Authenticity and Ethical Consumption in Rural Andalusia’. Following the seminar, Peter took part in an interview and shared his experience of consumption ethics. http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/researchevents/management/ethicsinconsumption/seminarsandevents/crossculturalissues/ http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/researchevents/management/ethicsinconsumption/
Cultural difference in business | Valerie Hoeks | TEDxHaarlem
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. One of the elements of the cultural difference between Europe and China is the importance that is given to relationships. In the West you would assume the importance to be the same, but there is a significant distinction. In China connections with the right people help you to get things done, to survive and to succeed. Whereas in the West content is predominant, in China the way people interact with each other strongly influences the working environment. 'Face' and long-term effects are taken into consideration. Valérie Hoeks (1982) studied Sinology at the Leiden University and has been active in China for over a decade as a traveller, a student and later as an entrepreneur. As soon as she set foot on Chinese soil she knew she would come back many times. In 2010 Valérie co-founded China Inroads in collaboration with with her Dutch and Chinese business partner. China Inroads provides a strong foothold for innovative companies that want to expand their business to the Chinese market. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 365364 TEDx Talks
Beirut and Dearborn: Collaboration and Cross-Cultural Academic Literarcies
 
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The Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud Center for American Studies and Research held a lectures entitled: Beirut and Dearborn: Collaboration and Cross-Cultural Academic Literarcies by William Degenaro & Margaret Williard-Traub, University of Michigan. Margaret Willard-Traub is Associate Professor of Composition and Rhetoric and Director of the Writing Program at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Her research and teaching interests include feminist composition, scholarly memoir, genre studies, writing assessment, and critical and trans-cultural pedagogies. Her articles have appeared in the U.S. journals College English, Assessing Writing, Rhetoric Review, Feminist Studies and Pedagogy and in a number of collected editions. William DeGenaro is a 2010-2011 Fulbright Scholar at the American University of Beirut, where he teaches courses in the communication skills program. He is also Associate Professor of Composition and Rhetoric at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. His research on the teaching of writing, U.S. working-class culture, and rhetorical theory have appeared in journals including Rhetoric Review, College English, and The International Journal of Critical Pedagogy.
What is CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean? CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY meaning
 
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What is CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean? CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY meaning - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY definition - CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cultural psychology is the study of how psychological and behavioral tendencies are rooted in and embodied in culture. The main tenet of cultural psychology is that mind and culture are inseparable and mutually constitutive, meaning that people are shaped by their culture and their culture is also shaped by them. As Richard Shweder, one of the major proponents of the field, writes, "Cultural psychology is the study of the way cultural traditions and social practices regulate, express, and transform the human psyche, resulting less in psychic unity for humankind than in ethnic divergences in mind, self, and emotion." Cultural psychology is often confused with cross-cultural psychology. However, cultural psychology is distinct from cross-cultural psychology in that the cross-cultural psychologists generally use culture as a means of testing the universality of psychological processes rather than determining how local cultural practices shape psychological processes. So whereas a cross-cultural psychologist might ask whether Jean Piaget's stages of development are universal across a variety of cultures, a cultural psychologist would be interested in how the social practices of a particular set of cultures shape the development of cognitive processes in different ways. Cultural psychology research informs several fields within psychology, including social psychology, cultural-historical psychology, developmental psychology, and cognitive psychology. However, the relativist perspective of cultural psychology, through which cultural psychologists compare thought patterns and behaviors within and across cultures, tends to clash with the universal perspectives common in most fields in psychology, which seek to qualify fundamental psychological truths that are consistent across all of humanity. According to Richard Shweder, there has been repeated failure to replicate Western psychology laboratory findings in non-Western settings. Therefore, a major goal of cultural psychology is to have many and varied cultures contribute to basic psychological theories in order to correct these theories so that they become more relevant to the predictions, descriptions, and explanations of all human behaviors, not just Western ones. This goal is shared by many of the scholars who promote the indigenous psychology approach. In an attempt to show the interrelated interests of cultural and indigenous psychology, cultural psychologist Pradeep Chakkarath emphasizes that international mainstream psychology, as it has been exported to most regions of the world by the so-called West, is only one among many indigenous psychologies and therefore may not have enough intercultural expertise to claim, as it frequently does, that its theories have universal validity. The acronym W.E.I.R.D. describes populations that are Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic. Thus far, W.E.I.R.D. populations have been vastly overrepresented in psychological research. Findings from psychology research utilizing primarily W.E.I.R.D. populations are often labeled as universal theories and are inaccurately applied to other cultures. Recent research is showing that cultures differ in many areas, such as logical reasoning and social values. The evidence that basic cognitive and motivational processes vary across populations has become increasingly difficult to ignore. For example, many studies have shown that Americans, Canadians and western Europeans rely on analytical reasoning strategies, which separate objects from their contexts to explain and predict behavior. Social psychologists refer to the "fundamental attribution error" or the tendency to explain people's behavior in terms of internal, inherent personality traits rather than external, situational considerations (e.g. attributing an instance of angry behavior to an angry personality). Outside W.E.I.R.D. cultures, however, this phenomenon is less prominent, as many non-W.E.I.R.D. populations tend to pay more attention to the context in which behavior occurs.....
Views: 3414 The Audiopedia
What is CULTURAL LITERACY? What does CULTURAL LITERACY mean? CULTURAL LITERACY meaning & explanation
 
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What is CULTURAL LITERACY? What does CULTURAL LITERACY mean? CULTURAL LITERACY meaning - CULTURAL LITERACY definition - CULTURAL LITERACY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cultural literacy is a term coined by E. D. Hirsch , referring to the ability to understand and participate fluently in a given culture. Cultural literacy is an analogy to literacy proper (the ability to read and write letters). A literate reader knows the object-language's alphabet, grammar, and a sufficient set of vocabulary; a culturally literate person knows a given culture's signs and symbols, including its language, particular dialectic, stories, entertainment, idioms, idiosyncrasies, and so on. The culturally literate person is able to talk to and understand others of that culture with fluency, while the culturally illiterate person fails to understand culturally-conditioned allusions, references to past events, idiomatic expressions, jokes, names, places, etc. For example, in 1908 British author G. K. Chesterton wrote, "Complete self-confidence is a weakness... the man who has has ‘Hanwell’ written on his face as plain as it is written on that omnibus.". This statement, especially the latter half, might be opaque to an American who does not know that "omnibus" is a less common, British word for "bus" and opaque to present-day Britons as "Hanwell" was the name of a (now defunct) insane asylum. Children of a given culture typically become culturally literate there via the process of enculturation. Enculturation seems to occur naturally, being intertwined with education, play, family relationships, friendships, etc. The cause of cultural literacy is a more difficult question when considering acculturation of immigrants, outsiders, cultural minorities, strangers, guests, etc. Literacy of a given culture seems to arise over time with consistent exposure to and participation in that culture, especially certain key cultural strongholds, like business, story, arts, education, history, religion, and family. One could become literate for an oral culture (with no written language or recorded media) only by extended conversation. Alternatively, one could become literate for a written culture through conversation as well as reading culturally relevant books or exposure to culturally relevant films, plays, monuments, television shows, etc. Western culture in general and Anglo-American culture in particular is a bibliocentric culture. It often trades in allusions to the Christian Bible, the influential works of Early Modern English such as works of William Shakespeare, the Thomas Cranmer Book of Common Prayer, Geoffrey Chaucer's poetry, and many others. Knowledge of these books (among others) contributes largely to cultural literacy in the west. However, also essential are exposure to the art, history, and the lived experience of members of that culture. The benefits and detriments of cultural literacy are debated. For example, social mobility increases when one is able to comfortably participate in conversation with gatekeepers like employers and teachers. Non-native members of a culture, such as missionaries to a foreign land or refugees from a native land, may experience negative consequences due to cultural illiteracy. However, the achievement of cultural literacy may seem to come at a cost to one's own native culture.
Views: 2512 The Audiopedia
Cross-Cultural Emblems, Prayer Beads, Hair Styles and Sacred Body Markings
 
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Bhakti Ananda Goswami aka David Sherman Reviews Various Sacred Cultural Commonalities Among the Ancient Traditions of the World. Hair styles, Diets, Tilak, Prayer Beads and their sacred meanings are all investigated. These Cultural Artifacts Reveal that the Same Divinities were Known and Worshiped Throughout the Ancient World. David Sherman Provides us with a Eyewitness Testimony regarding the One Faith that was prevalent around the Ancient World. The Primal Revelation at the Heart of Civilization by Collected Works of Sri Bhakti Ananda Goswami http://bhaktianandascollectedworks.wordpress.com/ Saint Francis of Assisi Ecumenical Retreat https://www.facebook.com/pages/Saint-Francis-of-Assisi-Ecumenical-Retreat/275018329827?ref=ts&fref=ts Dear Friends, Regarding the Screens made for me by Vaikunthanatha Dasa...After he filmed me reading the notes for my Goddard Graduate School Master's Thesis Rationale, before I had to leave, Vaikunthanatha Dasa offered to make some screens for me to 'show and tell' about some of the connections. I did not have anything prepared, but wanting to accept his very generous offer, I tried to put-together some quick lists. He then made these screens and I tried to say something about each of them. Minimally our attempt is useful as an introduction to some of my subjects, as I had no notes and was skipping-around without any real plan of presentation. However, since then (in the 1980s), in my facebook Notes and Albums, Internet Audio Archive recordings, collectedworks and other internet writings, I have explained many of these same subjects in more detail. I therefore recommend that if a subject interests you, try web searching it along with my name, Bhakti Ananda Goswami (or mis-spelled Bhakti Anand Swami), and you may find one of my articles, albums or audios on the subject.
Views: 398 Brannon
Cross cultural reflections: Adapting New Habits While Living in a New Culture
 
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Listen to an intersting habit I picked up while I was in India. Good for India, maybe not so much for US... but I still do it sometimes!! Welcome to this Cross-Cultural Training with your host, Jennifer Kumar Here's the article I refer to in the podcast. The Kitchen Connection: Bonding with Indian Culture and People through Food http://www.alaivani.com/Blog/tabid/56/EntryID/350/Default.aspx http://authenticjourneys.blogspot.com/2010/08/coaching-can-help-you-uncover-answers.html Cross cultural Tips and Awareness Series "Doing the dishes" A cross-cultural podcast which highlights how we can unconsciously pick up habits while living abroad that we may or may not realize, and that may or may not be 'appropriate' for our lives 'back home' in our native country or hometown. Creator of this Creator of this video, Jennifer Kumar, CC, LMSW is a life expat coach helping people living their best lives anywhere they relocate in the world! Need help trying to figure out what's culturally acceptable or balancing out cross-cultural experiences while or after living abroad, drop me a line at [email protected]://authenticjourneys.blogspot.comThank you for spending your time with me today.
Views: 742 Jen Kumar
Cross-Cultural Interviewing, Part 1
 
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The following article appeared in the May-June 2012 issue of Loss Prevention Magazine. Written by David Zulawski, CFE, CFI and Shane Sturman, CPP, CFI. Read by Wayne Hoover, CFI.
Views: 71 wicklanderzulawski
Sociology 333-Cross Cultural Human Sexuality Video Project
 
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Sources: http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/noncommunicable-diseases/mental-health/news/news/2012/12/child-marriage-a-threat-to-health Sandstrom, A., & Theodorou, A. E. (2016, September 12). Many countries allow child marriage. Retrieved March 31, 2018, De Groot, R., Kuunyem, M. Y., Palermo, T., on behalf of the Ghana LEAP 1000 evaluation, t., & Ghana LEAP 1000 evaluation, t. (2018). Child marriage and associated outcomes in northern Ghana: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 18, 1. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5166-6 https://conflictandhealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13031-017-0131-z Efevbera, Y., Bhabha, J., Farmer, P. E., & Fink, G. (2017). Girl child marriage as a risk factor for early childhood development and stunting. Social Science & Medicine, 185, 91-101. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.05.027
Views: 48 Vicky
Ch 40.2 Cross-cultural Exchanges
 
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Narrated PPT covering Ch 40.2 Cross-cultural Exchanges from Traditions & Encounters by Bentley & Ziegler. This is intended for students in Mr. M's Ap World class. Enjoy ;)
Views: 102 Alex Morales
(8) Cross-cultural coaching / Dr. Gary Collins
 
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Dr. Gary Collins has recorded this video at St Petersburg Christian University. www.spbcu.ru. Автор: Гари Коллинз -- лицензированный клинический психолог со степенью доктора наук (Ph.D.) в области клинической психологии в Университете Пердью. Он является автором многочисленных научных статей и более 50 книг. Наиболее известные из его трудов являются: «Пособие по христианскому душепопечению», «Коучинг в христианском служении. Как помочь людям реализовать свой потенциал», Коллинз является заслуженным профессором по коучингу и лидерству в Университете Ричмонд (Атланта), а также почетным консультантом на кафедре психологии и консультирования в Университете Риджент (Верджиния). В настоящее время Гари Коллинз преподает христианское консультирование и коучинг по всему миру. Gary R. Collins is a licensed clinical psychologist with a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Purdue University. He is author of numerous articles and over 50 books, including Christian Counseling: A Comprehensive Guide, The Biblical Basis of Christian Counseling, and Christian Coaching: Helping Others Turn Potential into Reality. http://www.garyrcollins.com/
Views: 600 Hodos Institute 1
DR HAMMOUDA SALHI -- CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION FOR CONFLICT AND PEACE
 
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Dr. Hammouda Salhi is the Director of the MA Program in Translation and Interpreting at the University of Tunis El Manar. He has extensive professional experience as a translator, and language consultant in the areas of law, business, security, diplomacy, administration, cross-cultural matters, and communication. He is a practicing conference interpreter and is accredited to several international institutions. His research interests are at the intersection between lexical studies, translation pedagogy and professional aspects of interpreting. He is a member of the editorial board of Translation and Translanguaging in Multilingual Contexts (TTMC), John Benjamins Publishing Company. Dr. Salhi has a BA in Translation, an MA in Linguistics and a PhD in Translation Studies. He also received specialized training in cultural translation and corpus processing. Dr. Salhi can be reached at [email protected]
Views: 409 TURJUMAN PROJECT
Challenges in cultural leadership
 
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Sandy Nairne, director of the National Portrait Gallery, describes issues facing today's cultural leaders, from pressure on public funds to increasing workforce diversity. You can also see this video and read the transcript here: http://www.creative-choices.co.uk/industry-news-views/article/issues-facing-cultural-leaders Get more information, advice and resources to help you develop a creative career at http://www.creative-choices.co.uk
Views: 2894 Creative Choices
Cross- Cultural Dialogue on Virtue: The Contribution of Fethullah Gulen, Professor Trudy Conway
 
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Professor Conway presented her book "Cross-cultural Dialogue on the Virtues: The Contribution of Fethullah Gulen" on February 4 at 12 PM at the Rumi Forum offices. The book explores the development of the influential worldwide Hizmet movement inspired by the Turkish scholar Fethullah Gülen, known for his moderate Islamic emphasis on peaceful relations among diverse people. It provides a detailed study of Gülen’s account of the virtues and argues that they provide the key to understanding this thinker and the movement he inspired, from its initial establishment of hospitality houses through the growth of worldwide schools, hospitals, media outlets, charitable associations and dialogue centers. The book analyzes the distinctive virtues that shaped the Hizmet movement’s ethos as well as continue to sustain its expansive energy, from the core virtues of tolerance, hospitality, compassion and charity to a host of related virtues, including wisdom, humility, mildness, patience, mercy, integrity and hope. It also examines the Islamic and Sufi roots of Gülen’s understanding of the virtues as well as presents a comparative study of Gülen’s account of the virtues in dialogue with prominent thinkers of the Western philosophical tradition and the religious traditions of Christianity, Judaism and Buddhism. The Hizmet movement provides living witness to the power and efficacy of tolerance, dialogue and peaceful relations among diverse people. This book offers an insightful portrait of the core virtues of this movement and the scholar who fully explored them within his writing. It will appeal to readers interested in virtue ethics, character education, cross-cultural studies, interfaith dialogue and the role of moderate Islam today. Conway-TrudyTrudy Conway began teaching at Mount Saint Mary's in 1979. Prior to that she taught at Shiraz University in Iran. She works in the area of contemporary philosophy and has published a book and articles on the works of Wittgenstein and Gadamer. She has published on the topic of intercultural understanding and dialogue and the hermeneutical issues and virtues associated with them. She has also written on, and is actively involved in the issue of the death penalty. She regularly teaches courses in the Veritascurriculum and a non-west course focusing on intercultural dialogue. She has offered a wide range of electives on topics in contemporary philosophy, specific moral virtues, and perspectives on the death penalty.
Views: 267 RumiForum
What Is The Meaning Of Cultural Knowledge?
 
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26 may 2006 since tylor's time, the concept of culture has become the central focus of that were made and used through cultural knowledge and skills a commonly used definition of cultural safety is that of williams (1999) who defined cultural it is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and. Cultural knowledge and how can we use it? Olivia 7 aug 2013 cultural is all know that characterize a particular culture. In absence of better knowledge we tend to assume, instead finding out aboriginal people have a rich culture involving custom, lore and value system based on the peoples, cultural can be defined as is social behavior norms found in human societies. Cross cultural knowledge management insights from springerknowledge hub translation, and intercultural competence. In this 12 jul 2017 culture is the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group people, encompassing language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music 15 apr 2015 there are two kinds about cultures one factual it usually obvious must be learned other interpretive 2 mar cultural capital accumulation knowledge, behaviors skills to understand concept more fully, useful break down into hidher language contingent on takes for granted culturally defined model universe. This publication is a work of the u. Cultural knowledge appears in handbook of research on efficacy and search inside this book misunderstandings arise when i use my meanings to make sense your reality. Human culture what is culture? Cultural safety. Culture matters! how cultural knowledge influences language [email protected] global. On the uses of cultural knowledge globalsecurity. Culturosity article what is cultural awareness? . By cultural find more terms and definitions using our dictionary search. Government as defined in title 17 the article focuses on need of cross cultural knowledge for people working 1973 white, l. Cultural knowledge in international marketing? Bayt what is cultural capital? Do i have it? Thoughtco. What is aboriginal cultural knowledge? Office of environment and culture wikipediadefinition live science. I will show first how, in the realm of lexical on uses cultural knowledgenovember 2007. The importance of cross cultural knowledge sciencedirect. Cultural knowledge and how can we use it? Olivia cultural eolss yahoo answers. Cross cultural knowledge management, innovation, the concept has helped us understand diversification of different management a well defined core and flex, kept under constant review is key to intelligence because it equips with ability experience new situations keywords translation, intercultural competence, knowledge, german, english for instance, 26. It can include descriptions such as those known cultural dimensions what is the role of knowledge in education a person? Nowadays more attention paid to concept sustainable development earth culture will define many things about that particular group, like their group called your and it 6 mar 2015 cul
Views: 57 Bet 2 Bet

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