Home
Search results “Content analysis of literature”
Textual Analysis in Literature (Quick Notes)
 
03:17
Textual Analysis in Literature (Quick Notes) Subscribe for more videos! ;)
Views: 814 BootyButtCheese TV
Content Analysis
 
07:39
Let's go on a journey and learn how to perform a content analysis!
Views: 100456 ChrisFlipp
What is CONTENT ANALYSIS? What does CONTENT ANALYSIS mean? CONTENT ANALYSIS meaning & explanation
 
03:56
What is CONTENT ANALYSIS? What does CONTENT ANALYSIS mean? CONTENT ANALYSIS meaning - CONTENT ANALYSIS definition - CONTENT ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Content analysis is a research method for studying documents and communication artifacts, which can be texts of various formats, pictures, audio or video. Social scientists use content analysis to quantify patterns in communication, in a replicable and systematic manner. One of the key advantage of this research method is to analyse social phenomena in a non-invasive way, in contrast to simulating social experiences or collecting survey answers. Practices and philosophies of content analysis vary between scholarly communities. They all involve systematic reading or observation of texts or artifacts which are assigned labels (sometimes called codes) to indicate the presence of interesting, meaningful patterns. After labeling a large set of media, a researcher is able to statistically estimate the proportions of patterns in the texts, as well as correlations between patterns. Computers are increasingly used in content analysis, to automate the labeling (or coding) of documents. Simple computational techniques can provide descriptive data such as word frequencies and document lengths. Machine learning classifiers can greatly increase the number of texts which can be labeled, but the scientific utility of doing so is a matter of debate. Content analysis is best understood as a broad family of techniques. Effective researchers choose techniques that best help them answer their substantive questions. That said, according to Klaus Krippendorff, six questions must be addressed in every content analysis: 1. Which data are analyzed? 2. How are the data defined? 3. From what population are data drawn? 4. What is the relevant context? 5. What are the boundaries of the analysis? 6. What is to be measured? The simplest and most objective form of content analysis considers unambiguous characteristics of the text such as word frequencies, the page area taken by a newspaper column, or the duration of a radio or television program. Analysis of simple word frequencies is limited because the meaning of a word depends on surrounding text. Keyword In Context routines address this by placing words in their textual context. This helps resolve ambiguities such as those introduced by synonyms and homonyms. A further step in analysis is the distinction between dictionary-based (quantitative) approaches and qualitative approaches. Dictionary-based approaches set up a list of categories derived from the frequency list of words and control the distribution of words and their respective categories over the texts. While methods in quantitative content analysis in this way transform observations of found categories into quantitative statistical data, the qualitative content analysis focuses more on the intentionality and its implications. There are strong parallels between qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis.
Views: 4529 The Audiopedia
Content Analysis Coding
 
11:16
Views: 147508 Sam Cotton
Content analysis
 
02:06
Basic information about what a content analysis and how to do a content analysis.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 33238 Katie Harrington
Thematic Analysis Process
 
11:03
Views: 101466 ProfCTimm
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
06:51
The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 704914 Kent Löfgren
Introduction to Discourse Analysis
 
02:34
Short introduction to discourse analysis
Views: 44028 Nature Therapy
How to Analyze Scholarly Articles
 
03:50
This is the CSU-Pueblo University Library Quick Class on How to Analyze Scholarly Articles. For more information, visit: http://library.csupueblo.edu
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
05:22
Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1049631 David Taylor
Organizing Information From Literature Review Articles
 
07:04
This is a sure fire way of helping you organize MANY research papers for a formal literature review using a spreadsheet - Essentially it is like completing a content analysis of area that you have highlighted in a large number of papers.
Views: 15420 Robin Kay
What is..? textual analysis
 
44:32
Presented by Imelda McDermott and Jonathan Hammond. Although discourse analysis has gained popularity in social research, there has been less attention on linguistic analysis of texts. Text analysis is an essential part of discourse analysis and this kind of ‘micro’ analysis provides a valuable supplement to other methods of analysis. This session showed examples of how to analyse both spoken (interviews) and written (policy documents) texts.
Views: 10294 methodsMcr
Bibliometric Analysis (1): Concepts in literature reviews
 
04:58
This video presents the definition of literature review, and definitions of different types of literature reviews. . If you are working on a literature review article or have plans to do in future, this could be very useful for you. . References: 1. Cooper, H.M., 1985. A Taxonomy of Literature Reviews. 2. Jesson, J., Matheson, L. and Lacey, F.M., 2011. Doing your literature review: Traditional and systematic techniques. Sage. 3. Hsieh, H.F. and Shannon, S.E., 2005. Three approaches to qualitative content analysis. Qualitative health research, 15(9), pp.1277-1288. . #LiteratureReview #BibliometricAnalysis #SystematicLiteratureReview #ContentAnalysis #MetaAnalysis #ResearchHUB . Published bibliometric studies by ResearchHUB Team: 1. A review of the internationalization of Chinese enterprises: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326693257_A_review_of_the_internationalization_of_Chinese_enterprises 2. A Review of Born globals: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00208825.2018.1443737 3. A review of green supply chain management: From bibliometric analysis to a conceptual framework and future research directions: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921344918302969
Views: 2362 Research HUB
Qualitative Data Analysis - Coding & Developing Themes
 
10:39
This is a short practical guide to Qualitative Data Analysis
Views: 114962 James Woodall
Academic Writing Tips : How to Write a Literary Analysis Paper
 
03:03
Writing a literary analysis paper involves finding a topic that is personally interesting, finding primary sources of other analysts and coming to a compelling conclusion. Write a literary analysis paper with tips from a produced playwright in this free video on writing. Expert: Laura Turner Bio: Laura Turner received her B.A. in English from the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., graduating magna cum laude with honors. Her plays have been seen and heard from Alaska to Tennessee. Filmmaker: Todd Green
Views: 80563 eHow
How To Analyse A Poem
 
05:09
Poetry Analysis Support: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/poetry-analysis-support-essay-writing-template-sentence-starters-annotation-prompts-12034083 How to analyse a poem – in six steps: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/how-to-analyse-a-poem-11494512 Analysing a poem can be tricky. Before you analyse a poem in detail, it is important to read through the poem several times. Try to read the poem aloud, because poems can often have a range of sound devices that can alter the poem's meaning. Once you've read through the poem, you can start analysing the poem's content. Here are six steps to help you to analyse a poem: Step 1: Subject. What is the poem about and why? Step 2: Theme. What are the recurring ideas and topics? Step 3: Tone. How would you describe the mood of the language? Step 4: Imagery. What literary devices are used and what do they signify? Step 5: Form. Why the poet has chosen this structure? Step 6: Feeling. What are the different emotions being conveyed? How do you analyse a poem? The prompts are a supportive tool, intended to encourage further analysis and interpretation. If you found this helpful, you may wish to check out Poetry Essay app. It provides you with a range of writing frames to help you stich a poetry essay together. Alternatively, please visit poetryessay.co.uk for some other free resources – such as posters, poetry annotations and planning templates – to assist your analysis of poetry. Poetry Essay app unfortunately is no longer supported, since iOS 11. For daily poetry news and essay support, please visit: http://www.poetryessay.co.uk
Views: 110086 Poetry Essay
Intro to Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses
 
16:57
Here's a brief introduction to how to evaluate systematic reviews.
Views: 165067 Rahul Patwari
Comm Research Methods - Content Analysis
 
28:15
Content Analysis 101
Views: 4044 Dan's Academy
How to social science 202 part 1 Content analysis and descriptive statistics
 
26:42
Course Aims and Objectives This course introduces students to quantitative research methods. Students will be introduced to survey methodology and experimental research designs and analysis using quantitative data. The course aims to teach students research methods which will prepare them to undertake further independent research in the political and social sciences. It covers contemporary statistical methods and research techniques. By the end of the course students should be aware of a wide range of research resources and be able to perform quantitative analyses on a variety of data in an intelligent and thoughtful manner. Introduction to Content Analysis This video provides an introduction to content analysis, with an example of manifest and latent coding as applied to a research question and cultural archive (Playboy magazine covers). https://youtu.be/Lur6ArVKXAI Week 5: Content analysis R.P. Weber (1990) Basic Content Analysis. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. 2nd edition. Krippendorff, K. (1980) Content Analysis: An Introduction to its Methodology. Beverly Hills: Sage. Seale, C. (ed) (1998) Researching Society and Culture. London: Sage. Riffe, D., Lacy, S. & Fico, F. (1998) Analysing media messages: using quantitative content analysis in research. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum. *Dunleavy, P. & S. Weir with Subrahmanyam,. Sleaze in Britain: Media Influences, Public Response, and Constitutional Significance’, Parliamentary Affairs, vol. 48, pp. 602-616. Molitor, F. and Sapolsky, B.S. (1993) Sex, Violence, and Victimization in Slasher Films. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 233-242 [University of London library] Siebert, D. and Drolet, J.C. (1993) ‘Death Themes in Literature for Children Ages 3-8’, Journal of School Health, vol. 63, no. 2, pp.86-90 [Goldsmiths College] Lasswell, H. (1942) Analysing the content of mass communication: a brief introduction. Washington: Library of Congress Althaus, S., Edy, J. and Phalen, P. (2001) Using substitutes for full-text news stories in content analysis: which text is best. American Journal of Political Science. Vol 45(3), 707- 724. Week 7: Introduction to data analysis: descriptive statistics Descriptive Statistics Black, T. (2002). Understanding Social Science Research. London: Sage. Chapter 6 Pennings, P., Keman, H. & Kleinnijenhuis, J. (1999). Doing Research in Political Science. London: Sage. Chapter 5. Owen, F. & Jones, R. (1994). Statistics. London: Pitman. Allison, P. (2001). Missing Data. London: Sage. Lewis-Beck, M. (1995). Data Analysis: An Introduction. London: Sage. My subscribers are awesome - you're awesome too so you should subscribe as well! Join my monthly seminar by supporting me on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/drkmwinters My YouTube Facebook page Kristi Winters https://www.facebook.com/youtubedrkmwinters/ Follow me on Twitter too! https://twitter.com/KWintie
Views: 1119 Kristi Winters
The Poetry of Sylvia Plath: Crash Course Literature 216
 
11:18
You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the poetry of Sylvia Plath. When a lot of people think about Sylvia Plath, they think about her struggles with mental illness and her eventual suicide. Her actual work can get lost in the shuffle a bit, so this video really tries to focus on the poetry. You'll learn about Sylvia Plath's role as a feminist poet, and you'll also learn about her extraordinary ability to recreate the experiences of real life in beautiful and relatable way. Hear John read all of Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus" here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auP1bHAglU0&feature=youtu.be
Views: 783282 CrashCourse
Qualitative Data Analysis with MAXQDA (Intro Webinar)
 
51:23
Watch this webinar for a quick overview of qualitative data analysis with MAXQDA 2018. Trainer: Graham Hughes. Learn more about MAXQDA here: https://www.maxqda.com/learn-maxqda The trainer demonstrates basic procedures of MAXQDA: for example creating a project, importing data, coding, search & retrieval. Besides learning about the basic functionality you will get a quick insight into some of the more advanced features of MAXQDA.
Views: 6436 MAXQDA VERBI
Using Excel to Conduct Quantitative Content Analysis
 
06:00
This tutorial shows how to conduct a quantitative content analysis using Excel.
Views: 9863 Gregory Fulkerson
Literature Review Analysis
 
02:48
Literature Review Analysis
Views: 79 DeEllen Stowell
Introduction to Content Analysis
 
08:05
This video provides an introduction to content analysis, with an example of manifest and latent coding as applied to a research question and cultural archive (Playboy magazine covers).
Views: 15243 Kari Lerum
Writing-up Qualitative Research
 
26:39
Looks at a range of issues that need thinking about when writing up qualitative research. These include: getting started, free-writing, organization – chronological, thematic etc. – focus, drop files, getting feedback, details, tightening up, style, conclusions and editing. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Becker, H. S. (1986). Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish your Thesis, Book or Article. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. Elbow, P. (1981) Writing with Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process. New York: Oxford University Press Wolcott, H. F. (2009) Writing up qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park, Calif. ; London: Sage.
Views: 42233 Graham R Gibbs
Context Analysis: An Example - GCSE English Literature
 
05:07
Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon*: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc *Some of these links are affiliate links, which give me a small commission that helps to support this Youtube channel. The cost remains the same to you, but if you don’t want to use the affiliate link you can simply search for the products yourself on Amazon or at mrbruff.com. More info on sponsors Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 11975 mrbruff
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
17:12
"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 520951 David Taylor
What Is The Content Analysis?
 
00:47
Researchers quantify and analyze nov 16, 2011 content analysisch1 analysis basics to general concepts dr. Content analysis what is content analysis? Audience dialoguecontent slidesharethe ten steps of analysisqualitative psychopentidsr toolkit for the impact digitised statistics solutionshow to plan and perform a qualitative study using. It provides a quantitative content analysis has been defined as the systematic, objective, of message characteristics. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches conventional, directed, or summative is widely used qualitative research technique. Terry college content analysis wikipedia en. Qualitative content analysis as mixed methods approach, following common refers to a general set of techniques useful for analysing and understanding collections text. This enables a more objective evaluation than content analysis is research tool used to determine the presence of certain words or concepts within texts sets. Wikipedia wiki content_analysis url? Q webcache. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data following information is a summary of excellent and comprehensive page on analysis by mike palmquist department english at volume 1, no20 june 2000philipp mayring. Social scientists use content analysis to quantify patterns in communication is a research technique used make replicable and valid inferences by interpreting coding textual material. He adopts what he calls a 'broad definition' of content analysis when writes is any technique for making the purpose to organize and elicit meaning from data collected draw realistic conclusions itContent methodology & prominent scholars. Three approaches to qualitative content analysis sage journalsqualitative forum introduction psychologypew research center. There is considerable work done in this area, content analysis a guide consisting of coded documents transcripts, newspapers, speech, and films that used order to study the counts word phrase cation, whether written or spoken. Content analysis methodology & prominent scholars. In essence it involves the classification of parts a text through mayring, philipp qualitative content analysis theoretical foundation, basic 1. This guide provides an introduction to content analysis, a research methodology that examines words or phrases within wide range of texts the ten step analysis are 1) copy and read through transcript make brief notes in margin when interesting relevant information is found refers family procedures for systematic, replicable text. Kimberly neuendorf, the content analysis is a method for summarizing any form of by counting various aspects. Essam obaid [email protected] what is content analysis. Content analysis is a research method for studying communication artifacts. Terry college three approaches to qualitative content analysis jul 01, 2016. Documents, oral communication, and graphics), quali
Views: 278 Ask Question II
Chapter 13 Secondary and Content Analysis
 
14:58
This chapter is about unobtrusive research
Views: 2502 Qingwen Dong
What is EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE? What does EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE mean?
 
04:56
What is EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE? What does EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE mean? EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE meaning - EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE definition - EMPIRICAL STUDY OF LITERATURE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The empirical study of literature is an interdisciplinary field of research which includes the psychology, sociology, Philosophy, the contextual study of literature, and the history of reading literary texts. The International Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media (IGEL) is one learned association which brings together experts in this field. Major journals in the field are Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Culture, the Media and the Arts, Poetics Today: International Journal for Theory and Analysis of Literature and Communication, and Scientific Study of Literature. The empirical study of literature attracts scholarship particularly in the areas of reception and audience studies and in cognitive psychology when it is concerned with questions of reading. In these two areas research and studies based on the framework are steadily growing. Further fields where the framework in various revised and expanded versions attracts scholarship is (comparative) cultural studies and pedagogy. One of several dictionary definitions of the field is as follows: “Movement within the study of literature concerned with the study of literature as a social system of actions. The main question is what happens to literature: it is written, published, distributed, read, censored, imitated, etc. The empirical study of literature originated as a reaction to, and an attempt at, solving the basic problem of hermeneutics; that is, how the validation of literary interpretation can be demonstrated. From reception theory it had already become clear that interpretations are not only tied to the text, but also, and even to a great extent, to the reader — both in terms of the individual and of social conventions. This led to the theory of radical (cognitive) constructivism, based on the thesis that the subject largely construes its empirical world itself. The logical consequence of all this, to be seen in the work of Siegfried J. Schmidt, is the separation of interpretation and the strictly scientific study of literature based on radical constructivism. The literary system of actions is observed from the outside — not experienced — and roughly characterized as depending on two conventions (hypotheses) that are tested continually. These conventions are the aesthetic convention (as opposed to the convention of facts in the daily language of reference) and the polyvalence convention (as opposed to the monovalency in the daily empirical world). Thus, the object of study of the empirical study of literature is not only the text in itself, but the roles of action within the literary system, namely, production, distribution, reception, and the processing of texts. The methods used are primarily taken from the social sciences, reception theory, cognitive science, psychology, etc. In general the steps to be taken in empirical research are the formation of a hypothesis, putting it into practice, testing, and evaluation. More concretely, for the study of reader response a wide array of techniques are used, ranging from protocol techniques and thinking aloud protocol to pre-structured techniques, such as the semantic seven point scale (C. Osgood) and the classification technique (card sorting), and forms of content analysis, discourse analysis, association techniques, etc. Some objections often raised to the empirical study of literature are the triviality of many of its research results such as confirmation of what was already known or suspected or its reductionism (artificiality of the framework and set-up, and limitation to reader response instead of the study of the text). It is clear, however, that the empirical study of literature by its specific approach of the object and its focus on methodology is an outstanding way to explore the socio-cultural aspects of the literary system. It makes an irreplaceable contribution to the development of a more rational, scientific, and socially relevant study of literature.”
Views: 651 The Audiopedia
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
09:26
Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 312969 David Taylor
The ABC's of the Alphabet Book Content Analysis
 
04:16
this video contains the picture books used for my Alphabet Book Content Analysis (ABCA)paper. - created at http://animoto.com
Views: 1605 Christy Berry
Thematic analysis
 
41:37
Thematic analysis is the most common form of analysis in qualitative research. It emphasizes pinpointing, examining, and recording patterns within data. Themes are patterns across data sets that are important to the description of a phenomenon and are associated to a specific research question. The themes become the categories for analysis. Thematic analysis is performed through the process of coding in six phases to create established, meaningful patterns. These phases are: familiarization with data, generating initial codes, searching for themes among codes, reviewing themes, defining and naming themes, and producing the final report. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 15214 Audiopedia
√ Techniques for Analysing Visual Texts | English
 
12:07
#iiutor #English #LanguageTechniques https://www.iitutor.com Techniques for Analysing Visual Texts • You probably have a good understanding of language techniques. • To analyse images, you need to understand the elements of an image. • Techniques help you to deconstruct the image and see the importance of things you might not have noticed before! Directional Terms • Layout: The way in which images or text blocks are arranged on a page in relation to each other. • You may also like to talk about the composition and where the eye is led. • This is useful for book covers, magazines and advertisements. • Background – the furthest distance away, often what is least important. • Mid-ground – the middle of the image if the image were 3D. • Foreground – the front of the image, often the focus point for the viewer. Things being emphasised are placed here. Image Relationships Juxtaposition: • Deliberately putting two objects together to make an association or relationship. • This often shows why they’re similar. Contrast: • To put two very different things together. • To show why they’re different. • NOTE: some people wrongly use contrast and juxtaposition interchangeably. Focus: • The place on the page your eye is drawn to when you first look at the picture. • The focus is often close to the centre of the frame. Frame: • What’s at the edge of the picture? • Why was it included, or why wasn’t it left out? • Usually helps to create a rectangular “cropped” feel to the image. Vector: • Lines on the page create a direction for your eye to travel in a specific order. • Something you follow often without even realising. • Similar to “where the eye is led” or a “directional line.” Colour Techniques • Vivid colour: like a dream or a child’s view, strong emotions. • Murky colour: something is wrong or dirty or ordinary. • Bright colour: lots of energy, new. • Pastel colour: gentle, dreamy, babies. • Dark colours: mysterious, evil, scary, unknown, strong emotion. • Watery colours: emotional, impression. • Red: danger, emotions like love and hate, fear, battle, blood, attention-seeking. Lighting Techniques • Bold: well defined lines or blocks of strong colour. • Stark: lots of dark and light contrast, sharp angles → cruel, mean, professional, clinical, or scientific. • Gradation: one spectrum to another gradually. • Implies change, loss, or distance. • Lighting effects: usually used for photographs only. • Light and shadow in the photo can help to place importance on the objects. • e.g. the lightest part of the picture is usually looked at first, as though it’s in a spotlight on a stage. Texture Techniques • Rough: looks natural, unfinished, unrefined, old etc. • Smooth: looks even, smooth, simple. Can be feminine, or sleek looking, or commercial or new. • Organic: round and flowing shapes and curves, looks natural, not sharp. • Geometric: looks computer-generated or not-real or unnatural, contrived etc. • Line: a directional technique – “the use of wood grains creates a directional line across the page for the eye to follow.”
Views: 13250 iitutor.com
William Blake: 'London' - Mr Bruff Analysis
 
19:53
Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon*: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc *Some of these links are affiliate links, which give me a small commission that helps to support this Youtube channel. The cost remains the same to you, but if you don’t want to use the affiliate link you can simply search for the products yourself on Amazon or at mrbruff.com. More info on sponsors Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 221418 mrbruff
How To Write A Research Proposal? 11 Things To Include In A Thesis Proposal
 
09:51
This video talks about 11 factors which should be clarified in a research thesis proposal: topic, literature review, research questions, sample, instrument, procedure, and so on... Related videos on this topic are listed below. ▼▼▼ What is a good Central Research Question? https://youtu.be/I4MfCDy7wDw Research aim, research objective, research question, and investigative question. https://youtu.be/ujKIM59hy9I Examples of Exploratory, Descriptive, and Causal Research Questions. https://youtu.be/I4MfCDy7wDw Research types, research designs, data collection, and sampling. https://youtu.be/WY9j_t570LY When to use a qualitative research design? Four things to consider. https://youtu.be/4FJPNStnTvA Please LIKE this video if you enjoyed it. Otherwise, there is a thumb-down button, too... :P ▶ Please SUBSCRIBE to see new videos (almost) every week! ◀ ▼MY OTHER CHANNEL (MUSIC AND PIANO TUTORIALS)▼ https://www.youtube.com/ranywayz ▼MY SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES▼ https://www.facebook.com/ranywayz https://nl.linkedin.com/in/ranywayz https://www.twitter.com/ranywayz Animations are made with Sparkol. Music files retrieved from YouTube Audio Library. All images used in this video are free stock images or are available in the public domain. The views expressed in this video are my own and do not necessarily reflect the organizations with which I am affiliated. The content of this video is presented as general information only. The creator of this video takes no responsibility for how the information presented in this video is interpreted or used by others. The creator of this video is in no event liable for damages of any kind incurred or suffered as a result of the use or non-use of the information presented in this video or the use of defective or incomplete information as contained in this video. #ResearchProposal #ThesisProposal #Dissertation #RanywayzRandom
Views: 107597 Ranywayz Random
Coding Part 2: Thematic coding
 
06:45
Thematic coding is one of the most common forms of qualitative data analysis and it is found in grounded theory, several forms of phenomenological analysis and framework analysis. The analyst tries to identify themes, categories or classifications of the data. Passages of the data (commonly an interview transcript) are coded to the themes - that is the passages are tagged or marked with the name of the theme. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 182133 Graham R Gibbs
ANE 4554 Textual Analysis Tutorial
 
08:58
Book Thief-Textual Analysis Video
Views: 8068 Ms. Caroline Trottier
Unit 3 Textual Analysis
 
07:45
Unit 3 Textual Analysis
Views: 3034 Jenny Lowry
Celine Marie Pascale-Qualitative Textual Analysis of Interviews and Media
 
01:04:25
Presentation by Dr. Celine-Marie Pascale, from American University, as part of the webinar series on qualitative methodology. Title: Qualitative Textual Analysis of Interviews and Media.
Case Study
 
04:38
Let's go on a journey and learn how to conduct case studies!
Views: 328439 ChrisFlipp
Using Grounded Theory Approach: From Start to Finish (Philip Adu, PhD.)
 
55:43
This presentation focuses on how to apply the grounded theory approach in the data collection and analysis process, and the development of a preposition, model or theory to explain a phenomenon of study. To access the PowerPoint, please go to: https://www.slideshare.net/kontorphilip/using-grounded-theory-approach-from-start-to-finish To buy Dr. Philip Adu's new book, 'A Step-by-Step Guide to Qualitative Data Coding', please go to Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Guide-Qualitative-Coding/dp/1138486876/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1543874247&sr=8-3&keywords=Philip+adu)
How to Analyze a Text
 
13:03
This video addresses Utah's Writing Standard 9 for Language Arts in Grades 11-12. It focuses on some of the ways in which a text can be analyzed and provides the basic vocabulary of an analysis. This video was intended for educational purposes and should only be used as supplemental material, not a holistic lesson on textual analysis.
Views: 11967 Braxton Thornley
WordStat - Content Analysis and Text Mining Software
 
14:57
WordStat a content analysis and text mining software from Provalis Research.
MAXQDA 12: Getting Started. Working with Text Documents
 
07:07
☞ The new MAXQDA 2018 is here! Check out all the new features: https://youtu.be/Ld-_0l1OGAI Watch this video to get a quick introduction to the basic features of MAXQDA 12: Create a new project, import documents, code data and search for coded segments. The features described are available in MAXQDA Standard, MAXQDA Plus and MAXQDA Analytics Pro. MAXQDA Base users may find a limited range of functionality in their product.
Views: 72606 MAXQDA VERBI
Sociology Research Methods: Crash Course Sociology #4
 
10:11
Today we’re talking about how we actually DO sociology. Nicole explains the research method: form a question and a hypothesis, collect data, and analyze that data to contribute to our theories about society. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** The Dress via Wired: https://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/ Original: http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Robert Kunz, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Jason A Saslow, Rizwan Kassim, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Steve Marshall, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Kyle Anderson, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Yana Leonor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Justin Zingsheim, Andrea Bareis, Moritz Schmidt, Bader AlGhamdi, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 362881 CrashCourse