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What is CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS? What does CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS mean?
 
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What is CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS? What does CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS mean? CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS meaning - CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS definition - CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Condensed matter physics is a branch of physics that deals with the physical properties of condensed phases of matter. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on atomic lattices, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in cold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using techniques of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists identify themselves as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society. The field overlaps with chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. Theoretical condensed matter physics shares important concepts and techniques with theoretical particle and nuclear physics. A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography, metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics. Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from "Solid state theory" to "Theory of Condensed Matter" in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter, which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the first institutes to conduct a research program in condensed matter physics. References to "condensed" state can be traced to earlier sources. For example, in the introduction to his 1947 book "Kinetic Theory of Liquids", Yakov Frenkel proposed that "The kinetic theory of liquids must accordingly be developed as a generalization and extension of the kinetic theory of solid bodies. As a matter of fact, it would be more correct to unify them under the title of 'condensed bodies'".
Views: 4918 The Audiopedia
Condensed matter physics |audio article DiscoverPhysics
 
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Physics Learn about what physics actually is, why it's awesome, and why you should come with me on a ride through understanding the wacky universe in which we live. Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. In particular it is concerned with the "condensed" phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interactions between the constituents are strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids, which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics , electromagnetism and statistical mechanics . The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using methods of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists self-identify as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society . The field overlaps with chemistry , materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. The theoretical physics of condensed matter shares important concepts and methods with that of particle physics and nuclear physics. A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography , metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics . Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson , the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories , Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter , and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter , which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. [8] The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the first institutes to conduct a research program in condensed matter physics. References to "condensed" state can be traced to earlier sources. For example, in the introduction to his 1947 book Kinetic Theory of Liquids, Yakov Frenkel proposed that "The kinetic theory of liquids must accordingly be developed as a generalization and extension of the kinetic theory of solid bodies. As a matter of fact, it would be more correct to unify them under the title of 'condensed bodies'". For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://DiscoverPhysics.business.site/ https://www.patreon.com/developers https://m.facebook.com/DiscoverPhysics https://www.quora.com/profile/Amir-Khan-2092 DiscoverPhysics m.YouTube.com [email protected]
Views: 1 DiscoverPhysics
Condensed matter physics
 
25:38
Condensed matter physics is a branch of physics that deals with the physical properties of condensed phases of matter. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, these include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids, while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on atomic lattices, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in cold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using techniques of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 808 Audiopedia
History of condensed matter physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Condensed_matter_physics 00:03:44 1 History of classical physics 00:03:54 1.1 Classical physics 00:06:28 1.2 Advent of quantum mechanics 00:09:31 1.3 Modern many-body physics 00:13:34 2 Theoretical 00:14:26 2.1 Emergence 00:15:23 2.2 Electronic theory of solids 00:17:38 2.3 Symmetry breaking 00:18:30 2.4 Phase transition 00:21:02 3 Experimental 00:21:42 3.1 Scattering 00:22:59 3.2 External magnetic fields 00:24:05 3.3 Cold atomic gases 00:25:14 4 Applications 00:26:27 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. In particular it is concerned with the "condensed" phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interactions between the constituents are strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids, which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using methods of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists self-identify as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society. The field overlaps with chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. The theoretical physics of condensed matter shares important concepts and methods with that of particle physics and nuclear physics.A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography, metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics. Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter, and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter, which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the first institutes to conduct a research program in condensed matte ...
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Condensed matter physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Condensed matter physics 00:03:43 1 History of classical physics 00:03:53 1.1 Classical physics 00:06:27 1.2 Advent of quantum mechanics 00:09:30 1.3 Modern many-body physics 00:13:32 2 Theoretical 00:14:24 2.1 Emergence 00:15:21 2.2 Electronic theory of solids 00:17:35 2.3 Symmetry breaking 00:18:27 2.4 Phase transition 00:20:58 3 Experimental 00:21:38 3.1 Scattering 00:22:55 3.2 External magnetic fields 00:24:01 3.3 Cold atomic gases 00:25:10 4 Applications 00:26:23 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. In particular it is concerned with the "condensed" phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interactions between the constituents are strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids, which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using methods of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists self-identify as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society. The field overlaps with chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. The theoretical physics of condensed matter shares important concepts and methods with that of particle physics and nuclear physics.A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography, metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics. Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter, and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter, which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the first institutes to conduct a research program in condensed matter physics.References to "condensed" state can be traced to earlier sources. For example, in the introduction to his 1947 book Ki ...
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Things to Know About Condensed matter physics
 
04:45
What is Condensed matter physics. The meaning of Condensed matter physics pronunciation Condensed matter physics definition Condensed matter physics How to say Condensed matter physics Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. In particular it is concerned with the "condensed" phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interactions between the constituents are strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids, which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using methods of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists self-identify as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society. The field overlaps with chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. The theoretical physics of condensed matter shares important concepts and methods with that of particle physics and nuclear physics. A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography, metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics. Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter, and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter , which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the first institutes to conduct a research program in condensed matter physics. References to "condensed" state can be traced to earlier sources. For example, in the introduction to his 1947 book Kinetic Theory of Liquids , Yakov Frenkel proposed that "The kinetic theory of liquids must accordingly be developed as a generalization and extension of the kinetic theory of solid bodies. As a matter of fact, it would be more correct to unify them under the title of 'condensed bodies'".Thanks for Watching please like and subscribe! Wikipedia.org article and images licensed cc-by-sa-4.0 , additional images public domain with the help of pixabay.org Except as otherwise noted, the content of this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0 License, If you found this content useful please donate so I can keep making it BTC: 14TQGMzgJ4uCFv9P5vAHRPk3PxySGVBwrJ
Condensed matter physics
 
20:33
Condensed matter physics Condensed matter physics is a branch of physics that deals with the physical properties of condensed phases of matter.Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. =======Image-Copyright-Info======== License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0) LicenseLink: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0 Author-Info: DG85 Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:QuantumPhaseTransition.png =======Image-Copyright-Info======== -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cr74ZZZ3K7Y
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Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
00:35
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annual_Review_of_Condensed_Matter_Physics Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8428815326709391 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics is an annual peer-reviewed review journal published by Annual Reviews. It was established in 2010 and covers advances in condensed matter physics and related subjects. The editor-in-chief is James S. Langer (University of California, Santa Barbara). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2016 impact factor of 18.588.
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How to Prepare Research Paper for Publication in MS Word (Easy)
 
07:47
How to Setup Research Paper for Publication in MS Word... Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/MeMJTube Follow on twitter: https://twitter.com/mj1111983 Website : http://www.bsocialshine.com IJERT, IEEE, IJSER, ,National Journal of System and Information Technology,Journal of Network and Information Security,Journal of IMS Group,Journal of Scientific and Technical Research,KIIT Journal of Library and Information Management,KIMI Hospitality Research Journal,Global Journal of Research in Management,Journal of Commerce and Accounting Research,Accounts of Chemical Research,Angewandte Chemie,Chemistry - A European Journal,Chemistry Letters,Helvetica Chimica Acta,Journal of the American Chemical Society,ACS Nano,Advanced Functional Materials,Advanced Materials,Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics,Journal of Materials Chemistry ,Nano Letters,Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics,Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis,Acta Crystallographica – parts A, B,Advances in Physics,American Journal of Physics,Annalen der Physik,Applied Physics Letters,Journal of Physics – parts A–D, G,Nature Physics,New Journal of Physics,Reports on Progress in Physics,International Journal of Biological Sciences,Journal of Cell Biology,Journal of Molecular Biology,Journal of Theoretical Biology,Journal of Virology,PLOS Biology,European Journal of Biochemistry,FEBS Journal,Journal of Biological Chemistry,Journal of Molecular Biology,American Journal of Botany,Annals of Botany,Aquatic Botany,International Journal of Plant Sciences,New Phytologist,Genes, Brain and Behavior,Journal of Neurochemistry,Journal of Neurophysiology,Journal of Neuroscience,Nature Neuroscience,Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria,Journal of Veterinary Science,Veterinary Record,Artificial Intelligence,Communications of the ACM,Computer,IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence,IEEE Transactions on Computers,IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation,IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems,IEEE Transactions on Information Theory,IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems,International Journal of Computer Vision,Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research,Journal of Cryptology,Journal of Functional Programming,Journal of Machine Learning Research,Journal of the ACM,SIAM Journal on Computing,Advances in Production Engineering & Management,Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering,Archive of Applied Mechanics,Biomedical Microdevices,Chemical Engineering Science,Coastal Engineering Journal,Electronics Letters,Experiments in Fluids,Green Chemistry,Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research,International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine,Journal of Environmental Engineering,Journal of Fluid Mechanics,Journal of Hydrologic Engineering,Journal of the IEST,Measurement Science and Technology,NASA Tech Briefs,Acta Mathematica,Annals of Mathematics,Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society,Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics,Duke Mathematical Journal,Inventiones Mathematicae,Journal of Algebra,Journal of the American Mathematical Society,Journal of Differential Geometry,Publications Mathématiques de l'IHÉS,Topology,Archives of Internal Medicine,British Medical Journal,Cardiovascular Diabetology,International Journal of Medical Sciences,Journal of the American Medical Association,Journal of Clinical Investigation,Journal of Experimental Medicine,The Lancet,Molecular Medicine,Nature Medicine,
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This Particle Breaks Time Symmetry
 
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Increasing entropy is NOT the only process that's asymmetric in time. Check out the book: http://WeHaveNoIdea.com This video was co-written by Daniel Whiteson and Jorge Cham You can also check out PhD Comics: http://phdcomics.com Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Tony Fadell, Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Jeff Straathof, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal, Nathan Hansen, Joshua Abenir Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://ve42.co/patreon Original paper on parity violation by the weak force by Lee and Yang: http://www.physics.utah.edu/~belz/phys5110/PhysRev.104.254.pdf More on B-meson oscillations and time reversal violation: Physics World Article: http://ve42.co/TimeReversal Original paper: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.1742.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_meson Physics consultant: Prof. Stephen Bartlett Studio filming by Raquel Nuno
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Condensed matter theory | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Condensed_matter_physics 00:04:50 1 History of classical physics 00:05:01 1.1 Classical physics 00:08:17 1.2 Advent of quantum mechanics 00:12:12 1.3 Modern many-body physics 00:17:26 2 Theoretical 00:18:30 2.1 Emergence 00:19:43 2.2 Electronic theory of solids 00:22:37 2.3 Symmetry breaking 00:23:43 2.4 Phase transition 00:27:01 3 Experimental 00:27:51 3.1 Scattering 00:29:29 3.2 External magnetic fields 00:30:53 3.3 Cold atomic gases 00:32:20 4 Applications 00:33:53 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8009843438663365 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Condensed matter physics is the field of physics that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of matter. In particular it is concerned with the "condensed" phases that appear whenever the number of constituents in a system is extremely large and the interactions between the constituents are strong. The most familiar examples of condensed phases are solids and liquids, which arise from the electromagnetic forces between atoms. Condensed matter physicists seek to understand the behavior of these phases by using physical laws. In particular, they include the laws of quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. The most familiar condensed phases are solids and liquids while more exotic condensed phases include the superconducting phase exhibited by certain materials at low temperature, the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of spins on crystal lattices of atoms, and the Bose–Einstein condensate found in ultracold atomic systems. The study of condensed matter physics involves measuring various material properties via experimental probes along with using methods of theoretical physics to develop mathematical models that help in understanding physical behavior. The diversity of systems and phenomena available for study makes condensed matter physics the most active field of contemporary physics: one third of all American physicists self-identify as condensed matter physicists, and the Division of Condensed Matter Physics is the largest division at the American Physical Society. The field overlaps with chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology, and relates closely to atomic physics and biophysics. The theoretical physics of condensed matter shares important concepts and methods with that of particle physics and nuclear physics.A variety of topics in physics such as crystallography, metallurgy, elasticity, magnetism, etc., were treated as distinct areas until the 1940s, when they were grouped together as solid state physics. Around the 1960s, the study of physical properties of liquids was added to this list, forming the basis for the new, related specialty of condensed matter physics. According to physicist Philip Warren Anderson, the term was coined by him and Volker Heine, when they changed the name of their group at the Cavendish Laboratories, Cambridge from Solid state theory to Theory of Condensed Matter in 1967, as they felt it did not exclude their interests in the study of liquids, nuclear matter, and so on. Although Anderson and Heine helped popularize the name "condensed matter", it had been present in Europe for some years, most prominently in the form of a journal published in English, French, and German by Springer-Verlag titled Physics of Condensed Matter, which was launched in 1963. The funding environment and Cold War politics of the 1960s and 1970s were also factors that lead some physicists to prefer the name "condensed matter physics", which emphasized the commonality of scientific problems encountered by physicists working on solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter, over "solid state physics", which was often associated with the industrial applications of metals and semiconductors. The Bell Telephone Laboratories was one of the firs ...
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Fraunhofer Lines and Condensed Matter - Even Kirchhoff Agreed!
 
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P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block. Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 4, 90-142. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-35-16.PDF W.H. Wollaston W.H. A method of examining refractive and dispersive powers, by prismatic reflection. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London, 1802, v. 92, 365-380. J. Fraunhofer, Bestimmung des Brechungs und des Farbenzerstreuungs-Vermogens verschiedener Glasarten, in Bezug auf die Vervollkommnung achromatischer Fernrohre. Denkschriften der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Munchen, 1814/1815,v. 5, 193–226. G. Kirchhoff and R. Bunsen, Chemical analysis by spectral observations. (Reprinted from Poggendorf ’s Annalen der Physik, 1860, v. 110, In: The laws of Radiation and Absorption — Memoirs by Prévost, Stewart, Kirchhoff, and Kirchhoff and Bunsen (D.B. Brace, Ed.), American Book Company, N.Y., 1901, p. 99–126). G. Kirchhoff, Researches on the Solar Spectrum, and the Spectra of the Chemical Elements (Translated by H.E. Roscoe), Macmillan and Co., Cambridge, U.K., 1862. A. Unsöld, Über die Struktur der Fraunhofersehen Linien und die quantitative Spektralanalyse der Sonnenatmosphäre. Zeitschrift für Physik,1928, v. 46, no. 11–12, 765–781. High resolution spectrum of the Sun. https://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0600.html Image credit: N.A.Sharp, NOAO/NSO/Kitt Peak FTS/AURA/NSF High resolution spectrum of several stars. https://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0649.html Image Credit: NOAO/AURA/NSF twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe. Sky Scholar will be releasing at least one video per week to make sure you don’t run out of content! Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more. These presentations are not endorsed by The Ohio State University. Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only. This channel is educational in nature. Astronomy links of interest: Space Weather: http://spaceweathernews.com/ NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/ NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/ NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/ NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/ SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/ SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ IRIS Satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/iris/index.html Hinode, JAXA/NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hinode/index.html Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/ National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/ 1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope: www.isf.astro.su.se/ All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA). Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra: http://vixra.org/author/pierre-marie_robitaille Outro Music: Foria: Break Away https://soundcloud.com/foria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUweq5FAcE
Views: 2326 Sky Scholar
Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Physics:_Condensed_Matter 00:00:37 Abstracting and indexing Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.953042839443966 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1989 and published by IOP Publishing. The journal covers all areas of condensed matter physics including soft matter and nanostructures. The editor-in-chief is Jason Gardner (National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation). The journal was formed by the merger of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics and Journal of Physics F: Metal Physics in 1989.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Is the Corona only Gaseous Plasma? Evidence for Condensed Matter!
 
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P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 4, 90-142. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-35-16.PDF P.M. Robitaille, The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L15-L21. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L6.PDF Robitaille P.-M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L22-L25. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L7.PDF Robitaille P.-M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L30-36. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L9.PDF Aschwanden M. Physics of the Solar Corona: An Introduction with Problems and Solutions. Springer in association with Praxis Publishing, Chichester, U.K., 2005, p. 84. V.M. Nakariakov and E. Verwichte, Seismology of the corona of the Sun, AG, 2004, v. 45, 4.26-4.27. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physics/research/cfsa/people/valery/research/mhdcs/agnakariakovverwichte.pdf COMET Credit: NASA/SOHO https://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/pickoftheweek/old/13may2011/CometC2_May2011_best.mov Coronal Rain Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11168 Helioviewer SDO year 5 - Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011700/a011742/11742_SDO-Year_5_H264_Good_1280x720_2997.mov Coronal Hole 1: Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO https://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/gallery/movies/Coronal_hole_193_Feb_big.mp4 Coronal Hole 2: Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/video/coronal_hole_211_big_1.mp4 Coronal Hole 3: Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO https://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/gallery/movies/Long_Cor_Hole193_big.mp4 Hinode Image of the Chromosphere: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/chromosphere Credit: Scott McIntosh, Bart De Pontieu, Viggo Hansteen and Karel Schrijver/UCAR NASA/JAXA/Hinode twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe. Sky Scholar will be releasing at least one video per week to make sure you don’t run out of content! Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more. These presentations are not endorsed by The Ohio State University. Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only. This channel is educational in nature. Astronomy links of interest: Space Weather: http://spaceweathernews.com/ NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/ NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/ NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/ NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/ SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/ SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ IRIS Satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/iris/index.html Hinode, JAXA/NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hinode/index.html Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/ National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/ 1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope: www.isf.astro.su.se/ All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA). Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra: http://vixra.org/author/pierre-marie_robitaille Outro Music: Foria: Break Away https://soundcloud.com/foria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUweq5FAcE
Views: 2088 Sky Scholar
Scientists Invented The Best Tractor Beam Ever!
 
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Tractor beams used to be an idea used in sci-fi films, but now they have become a reality! Join Trace as he discusses a new tractor beam that is the best one yet! Go to http://www.harrys.com and use the promo code dnews to save $5 off your first purchase! Read More: A long-range polarization-controlled optical tractor beam http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphoton.2014.242.html "The laser beam has become an indispensable tool for the controllable manipulation and transport of microscopic objects in biology, physical chemistry and condensed matter physics." Behold the Long-Range, Reversible Tractor Beam http://motherboard.vice.com/read/tractor-beam-technology-goes-long-range "It's a classic sci-fi image: some spaceship has nearly escaped the enemy fleet, only to be snatched back by a tractor beam." NASA Considers Tractor Beams for Future Rovers http://www.wired.com/2011/11/probes-tractor-beams/ "NASA is exploring ways to use tractor beams in future robotic probe missions." Laser-Powered Tractor Beam Could Move Tiny Particles http://www.wired.com/2011/03/laser-tractor-beam/ "Another piece of Star Trek technology has become a reality. Captain Kirk would instantly recognize new blueprints developed by a team of Chinese scientists as plans for a tractor beam." Viewpoint: A Macroscopic Tractor Beam with Acoustic Waves http://physics.aps.org/articles/v7/46 "Among the many examples of how science fiction and fantasy have inspired real science, an interesting one is the 'tractor beam,' first conceived by the chemical engineer and writer Edward E. Smith in the 1930s in his novel Spacehounds of IPC." Optical conveyors: A class of active tractor beams http://physics.nyu.edu/grierlab/conveyor7c/conveyor7c.pdf "A tractor beam is a traveling wave that can transport illuminated material along its length back to its source." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 135072 Seeker
The Sun is NOT a Gaseous Plasma! The LMH Solar Model!
 
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Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe. Sky Scholar will be releasing at least one video per week to make sure you don’t run out of content! P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter - The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 4, 90-142. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-35-16.PDF J.C. Robitaille and P.M. Robitaille Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 2, 87-97. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-33-14.PDF P.M. Robitaille, The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L15-L21. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L6.PDF P.M. Robitaille, The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L22-L25. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L7.PDF P.M. Robitaille, The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L26-L29. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L8.PDF P.M. Robitaille, The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona, Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 3, L30-L36. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-34-L9.PDF Helioseismic results from GONG https://gong.nso.edu/gallery/disk2k10/data/resource/torsional/gongcut.png Ripples on the Sun https://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/gallery/images/quakes.html Splashes onto the photosphere https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDLzQN1H6cA twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more. These presentations are not endorsed by The Ohio State University. Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only. This channel is educational in nature. Astronomy links of interest: Space Weather: http://spaceweathernews.com/ NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/ NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/ NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/ NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/ SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/ SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ IRIS Satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/iris/index.html Hinode, JAXA/NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hinode/index.html Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/ National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/ 1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope: www.isf.astro.su.se/ All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA). Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra: http://vixra.org/author/pierre-marie_robitaille Outro Music: Foria: Break Away https://soundcloud.com/foria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUweq5FAcE
Views: 20794 Sky Scholar
What is SOLID-STATE PHYSICS? What does SOLID-STATE PHYSICS mean? SOLID-STATE PHYSICS meaning
 
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What is SOLID-STATE PHYSICS? What does SOLID-STATE PHYSICS mean? SOLID-STATE PHYSICS meaning - SOLID-STATE PHYSICS definition - SOLID-STATE PHYSICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Solid-state physics is the study of rigid matter, or solids, through methods such as quantum mechanics, crystallography, electromagnetism, and metallurgy. It is the largest branch of condensed matter physics. Solid-state physics studies how the large-scale properties of solid materials result from their atomic-scale properties. Thus, solid-state physics forms a theoretical basis of materials science. It also has direct applications, for example in the technology of transistors and semiconductors. Solid materials are formed from densely packed atoms, which interact intensely. These interactions produce the mechanical (e.g. hardness and elasticity), thermal, electrical, magnetic and optical properties of solids. Depending on the material involved and the conditions in which it was formed, the atoms may be arranged in a regular, geometric pattern (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary water ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass). The bulk of solid-state physics, as a general theory, is focused on crystals. Primarily, this is because the periodicity of atoms in a crystal — its defining characteristic — facilitates mathematical modeling. Likewise, crystalline materials often have electrical, magnetic, optical, or mechanical properties that can be exploited for engineering purposes. The forces between the atoms in a crystal can take a variety of forms. For example, in a crystal of sodium chloride (common salt), the crystal is made up of ionic sodium and chlorine, and held together with ionic bonds. In others, the atoms share electrons and form covalent bonds. In metals, electrons are shared amongst the whole crystal in metallic bonding. Finally, the noble gases do not undergo any of these types of bonding. In solid form, the noble gases are held together with van der Waals forces resulting from the polarisation of the electronic charge cloud on each atom. The differences between the types of solid result from the differences between their bonding. The physical properties of solids have been common subjects of scientific inquiry for centuries, but a separate field going by the name of solid-state physics did not emerge until the 1940s, in particular with the establishment of the Division of Solid State Physics (DSSP) within the American Physical Society. The DSSP catered to industrial physicists, and solid-state physics became associated with the technological applications made possible by research on solids. By the early 1960s, the DSSP was the largest division of the American Physical Society. Large communities of solid state physicists also emerged in Europe after World War II, in particular in England, Germany, and the Soviet Union. In the United States and Europe, solid state became a prominent field through its investigations into semiconductors, superconductivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and diverse other phenomena. During the early Cold War, research in solid state physics was often not restricted to solids, which led some physicists in the 1970s and 1980s to found the field of condensed matter physics, which organized around common techniques used to investigate solids, liquids, plasmas, and other complex matter. Today, solid-state physics is broadly considered to be the subfield of condensed matter physics that focuses on the properties of solids with regular crystal lattices.
Views: 4863 The Audiopedia
Qubism - self-similar visualization of many-body wavefunctions
 
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Video abstract for the article 'Qubism: self-similar visualization of many-body wavefunctions ' by Javier Rodríguez-Laguna, Piotr Migdał, Miguel Ibáñez Berganza, Maciej Lewenstein and Germán Sierra (Javier Rodríguez-Laguna et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 053028) Read the full article in New Journal of Physics at http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/14/5/053028/article. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SUMMARY Introduction and background. Quantum many-body wavefunctions encode the behaviour of most interesting systems studied by condensed-matter physics or quantum information theory: correlations, entanglement, local or non-local order parameters, etc. They are extremely complex mathematical objects: their number of parameters scales exponentially with the system size. Main results. We introduce a two-dimensional pictorial representation technique for many-qubit wavefunctions, which we have termed 'qubism'. Its main property is recursivity: increasing the number of qubits reflects in an increase in the image resolution. Thus, the plots are typically fractal-like for translationally-invariant states. We examine ground states of commonly used Hamiltonians in condensed matter and cold atom physics, such as the Heisenberg or the Ising model in a transverse field. Many features of the wavefunction, such as magnetization, correlations and criticality, are represented by visual properties of the images. In particular, entanglement can be easily spotted, as a deviation from trivial self-similarity. Wider implications. Visualization of mathematical objects is always a source of insight and new problems. Our techniques allow the researchers in quantum many-body physics to use plots and images as a guide and representation tool. The extension of these techniques to other fields which suffer from combinatorial explosion (DNA analysis, stochastic processes, categorical time series etc) is straightforward.
Views: 544 NewJournalofPhysics
What is MATERIALS PHYSICS? What does MATERIALS PHYSICS mean? MATERIALS PHYSICS meaning & explanation
 
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What is MATERIALS PHYSICS? What does MATERIALS PHYSICS mean? MATERIALS PHYSICS meaning - MATERIALS PHYSICS definition - MATERIALS PHYSICS explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Material physics is the use of physics to describe the physical properties of materials. It is a synthesis of physical sciences such as chemistry, solid mechanics, solid state physics, and materials science. Materials physics is considered a subset of condensed matter physics and applies fundamental condensed matter concepts to complex multiphase media, including materials of technological interest. Current fields that materials physicists work in include electronic, optical, and magnetic materials, novel materials and structures, quantum phenomena in materials, nonequilibrium physics, and soft condensed matter physics. New experimental and computational tools are constantly improving how materials systems are modeled and studied and are also fields when materials physicists work in.
Views: 44 The Audiopedia
Theory of Condensed Matter | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavendish_Laboratory 00:00:44 1 History 00:02:55 1.1 Nuclear physics 00:04:03 1.2 Biology 00:07:50 1.3 Cavendish Professors of Physics 00:08:11 1.4 Heads of department 00:08:20 2 Cavendish Groups 00:08:35 3 Cavendish staff and alumni 00:08:57 3.1 Notable senior academic staff 00:09:14 3.2 Notable emeritus professors 00:09:36 3.3 Nobel Laureates at the Cavendish 00:09:46 3.4 Alumni Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7992159996537108 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Cavendish Laboratory is the Department of Physics at the University of Cambridge, and is part of the School of Physical Sciences. The laboratory was opened in 1874 on the New Museums Site as a laboratory for experimental physics. The laboratory moved to its present site in West Cambridge in 1974. As of 2011, 29 Cavendish researchers have won Nobel Prizes. In the Research Excellence Framework the Cavendish Laboratory is ranked as the 7th-equal best physics department in the country.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
What is CHEMICAL PHYSICS? What does CHEMICAL PHYSICS mean? CHEMICAL PHYSICS meaning
 
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What is CHEMICAL PHYSICS? What does CHEMICAL PHYSICS mean? CHEMICAL PHYSICS meaning. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Chemical physics is a subdiscipline of chemistry and physics that investigates physicochemical phenomena using techniques from atomic and molecular physics and condensed matter physics; it is the branch of physics that studies chemical processes from the point of view of physics. While at the interface of physics and chemistry, chemical physics is distinct from physical chemistry in that it focuses more on the characteristic elements and theories of physics. Meanwhile, physical chemistry studies the physical nature of chemistry. Nonetheless, the distinction between the two fields is vague, and workers often practice in both fields during the course of their research. The United States Department of Education defines chemical physics as "A program that focuses on the scientific study of structural phenomena combining the disciplines of physical chemistry and atomic/molecular physics. Includes instruction in heterogeneous structures, alignment and surface phenomena, quantum theory, mathematical physics, statistical and classical mechanics, chemical kinetics, and laser physics." Chemical physicists commonly probe the structure and dynamics of ions, free radicals, polymers, clusters, and molecules. Areas of study include the quantum mechanical behavior of chemical reactions, the process of solvation, inter- and intra-molecular energy flow, and single entities such as quantum dots. Experimental chemical physicists use a variety of spectroscopic techniques to better understand hydrogen bonding, electron transfer, the formation and dissolution of chemical bonds, chemical reactions, and the formation of nanoparticles. Theoretical chemical physicists create simulations of the molecular processes probed in these experiments to both explain results and guide future investigations. The goals of chemical physics research include understanding chemical structures and reactions at the quantum mechanical level, elucidating the structure and reactivity of gas phase ions and radicals, and discovering accurate approximations to make the physics of chemical phenomena computationally accessible. Chemical physicists are looking for answers to such questions as: Can we experimentally test quantum mechanical predictions of the vibrations and rotations of simple molecules? Or even those of complex molecules (such as proteins)? Can we develop more accurate methods for calculating the electronic structure and properties of molecules? Can we understand chemical reactions from first principles? Why do quantum dots start blinking (in a pattern suggesting fractal kinetics) after absorbing photons of light? How do chemical reactions really take place? What is the step-by-step process that occurs when an isolated molecule becomes solvated? Or when a whole ensemble of molecules becomes solvated? Can we use the properties of negative ions to determine molecular structures, understand the dynamics of chemical reactions, or explain photodissociation? Why does a stream of soft x-rays knock enough electrons out of the atoms in a xenon cluster to cause the cluster to explode?
Views: 1087 The Audiopedia
Prof. Phuan Ong, "Thermal Hall Effect of Spin Excitation in Quantum Magnets", Lecture 1(04) of 2
 
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"Thermal Hall Effect of Spin Excitation in Quantum Magnets", Lecture 1(04) of 2 Prof. Phuan Ong, Princeton University Princeton Summer School for Condensed Matter Physics (PSSCMP) Princeton University Aug 08-11, 2016 Slides and further information are available on the summer school website: http://pccm.princeton.edu/education/princeton-summer-school-condensed-matter-physics/speakers-topics
Views: 71 PSSCMP
Material physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Materials_physics 00:00:54 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8866238340280665 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Material physics is the use of physics to describe the physical properties of materials. It is a synthesis of physical sciences such as chemistry, solid mechanics, solid state physics, and materials science. Materials physics is considered a subset of condensed matter physics and applies fundamental condensed matter concepts to complex multiphase media, including materials of technological interest. Current fields that materials physicists work in include electronic, optical, and magnetic materials, novel materials and structures, quantum phenomena in materials, nonequilibrium physics, and soft condensed matter physics. New experimental and computational tools are constantly improving how materials systems are modeled and studied and are also fields when materials physicists work in.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Mesoscopic physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Mesoscopic physics 00:02:49 1 Quantum confinement effects 00:05:16 2 Interference effects 00:06:06 3 Time-resolved mesoscopic dynamics Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Disambiguation: This page refers to the sub-discipline of condensed matter physics, not the branch of mesoscale meteorology concerned with the study of weather systems smaller than synoptic scale systems.Mesoscopic physics is a subdiscipline of condensed matter physics that deals with materials of an intermediate length. The scale of these materials can be described as being between the size of a quantity of atoms (such as a molecule) and of materials measuring micrometres. The lower limit can also be defined as being the size of individual atoms. At the micrometre level are bulk materials. Both mesoscopic and macroscopic objects contain a large number of atoms. Whereas average properties derived from its constituent materials describe macroscopic objects, as they usually obey the laws of classical mechanics, a mesoscopic object, by contrast, is affected by fluctuations around the average, and is subject to quantum mechanics.In other words, a macroscopic device, when scaled down to a meso-size, starts revealing quantum mechanical properties. For example, at the macroscopic level the conductance of a wire increases continuously with its diameter. However, at the mesoscopic level, the wire's conductance is quantized: the increases occur in discrete, or individual, whole steps. During research, mesoscopic devices are constructed, measured and observed experimentally and theoretically in order to advance understanding of the physics of insulators, semiconductors, metals and superconductors. The applied science of mesoscopic physics deals with the potential of building nanodevices. Mesoscopic physics also addresses fundamental practical problems which occur when a macroscopic object is miniaturized, as with the miniaturization of transistors in semiconductor electronics. The physical properties of materials change as their size approaches the nanoscale, where the percentage of atoms at the surface of the material becomes significant. For bulk materials larger than one micrometre, the percentage of atoms at the surface is insignificant in relation to the number of atoms in the entire material. The subdiscipline has dealt primarily with artificial structures of metal or semiconducting material which have been fabricated by the techniques employed for producing microelectronic circuits.There is no rigid definition for mesoscopic physics but the systems studied are normally in the range of 100 nm (the size of a typical virus) to 1 000 nm (the size of a typical bacterium): 100 nanometers is the approximate upper limit for a nanoparticle. Thus, mesoscopic physics has a close connection to the fields of nanofabrication and nanotechnology. Devices used in nanotechnology are examples of mesoscopic systems. Three categories of new phenomena in such systems are interference effects, quantum confinement effects and charging effects.
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Advances in Engineering introduction
 
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Advances in Engineering (https://advanceseng.com/) the World leading source of Engineering research news: featuring the innovations and technologies that will lead to a bright tomorrow. Advances in Engineering highlight papers of exceptional scientific importance to a broad scientific & engineering audience. Advances in Engineering is viewed almost 650,000 times each month by engineers, professors and scientists and it is linked to the top 50 engineering companies as well as major research institutions. There are nine key scientific articles categories at Advances in Engineering: Key Chemical Engineering Articles: Selected original and highly significant papers in the field of chemical reaction engineering, Fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, multiphase flows, separations processes, thermodynamics, process systems engineering, catalysis, and electrochemical phenomena. See link: https://advanceseng.com/chemical-engineering/ Key Materials Engineering Articles: The best papers in new innovations in materials engineering research are selected. Including Engineering and structural materials (metals, alloys, ceramics, composites). Organic and soft materials such as (polymers, colloids, liquid crystals) , Magnetic materials and Surfaces and thin films. See link: https://advanceseng.com/materials-engineering/ Key Electrical Engineering Articles. Papers address research and development in electrical engineering. Papers focus on microelectronics, signal processing, energy and power systems, circuits, control systems and communication systems. See link: https://advanceseng.com/electrical-engineering/ Key Mechanical Engineering Articles: Papers selected are significant research in mechanics, Vibration and Control, thermodynamics, mechatronics, fluid mechanics, tribology, Thermal Engineering, industrial engineering and structural analysis. See link: https://advanceseng.com/mechanical-engineering/ Key biomedical Engineering Articles: Papers featured are in the field of biomechanics, physiological modeling, biomedical signal processing and medical device development. See link: https://advanceseng.com/biomedical-engineering/ Key Applied Physics Articles: Papers featured are the most significant and new results in Electrical Discharges; Plasmas; and Plasma-Surface Interactions, Energy Conversion and Storage, Condensed matter, Magnetism; and Superconductivity, Photonics and lasers. See link: https://advanceseng.com/applied-physics/ Key Civil Engineering Articles: Selected papers are in the field of environmental engineering, hydrotechnical engineering, structure engineering, construction engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Nuclear Power Engineering, Transportation Engineering, and Water Engineering. See link: https://advanceseng.com/civil-engineering/ Key Nano-technology Engineering Articles: Papers selected are advancement in engineering, with an emphasis in their interface with nanoscience and nano-technology. See link: https://advanceseng.com/nanotechnology-engineering/ And key general Engineering articles: Papers are from wide and broad fields of engineering not covered in the engineering disciplines mentioned above. See link: https://advanceseng.com/general-engineering/ As an attestation for the research excellence. Advances in Engineering upon request can provide the invited authors Key scientific article certificate. Explore today at (https://advanceseng.com/ ): Top papers (Civil, Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical, materials, Biomedical, Nanotechnology Engineering & Applied Physics) highlighted at Advances in Engineering based on the quality of research and its potential scientific impact. Thank You Advances in Engineering team (https://advanceseng.com/ )
Is Space Superfluid+VantaBlack+Sulfur Hexafluoride = Dark Matter?
 
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Conduct your own virtual science experiments online: https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulations/category/physics/light-and-radiation Condensed Matter Physics: What are the differences between superconductivity and superfluidity? -https://www.quora.com/Condensed-Matter-Physics-What-are-the-differences-between-superconductivity-and-superfluidity THE WEIRD WAYS OF SUPERFLUID HELIUM - http://www.popsci.com/article/science/weird-ways-superfluid-helium I AM WIDE OPEN TO CONDUCTING A PRIVATE HANGOUT WITH NY INTERESTED YOUTUBE CHANNELER OUT THERE - FRIEND, FOE AND/OR INDIFFERENT. Email direct at [email protected] Let's begin collaborating on all of this. Pick whoever else you want to be the voice and face to put the data and strategic message.
Views: 2756 PLANATE VERITAS
List of unsolved problems in physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unsolved_problems_in_physics 00:01:02 1 Unsolved problems by subfield 00:01:21 1.1 General physics/quantum physics 00:05:51 1.2 Cosmology and general relativity 00:10:17 1.3 Quantum gravity 00:13:46 1.4 High-energy physics/particle physics 00:18:51 1.5 Astronomy and astrophysics 00:24:43 1.6 Nuclear physics 00:26:36 1.7 Atomic, molecular and optical physics 00:27:06 1.8 Classical mechanics 00:27:37 1.9 Condensed matter physics 00:30:37 1.10 Plasma physics 00:32:31 1.11 Biophysics 00:33:31 2 Problems solved in recent decades 00:42:58 3 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.861202569402049 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Some of the major unsolved problems in physics are theoretical, meaning that existing theories seem incapable of explaining a certain observed phenomenon or experimental result. The others are experimental, meaning that there is a difficulty in creating an experiment to test a proposed theory or investigate a phenomenon in greater detail. There are still some deficiencies in the Standard Model of physics, such as the origin of mass, the strong CP problem, neutrino oscillations, matter–antimatter asymmetry, and the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Another problem lies within the mathematical framework of the Standard Model itself—the Standard Model is inconsistent with that of general relativity, to the point that one or both theories break down under certain conditions (for example within known spacetime singularities like the Big Bang and the centers of black holes beyond the event horizon).
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Intercalate Zones in the Sun and Stars!
 
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Interchelate Zones, Fast Solar Winds, Activity, and Current Flow: Does our Sun have a Charge? P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 4, 90-142. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-35-16.PDF J.C. Robitaille and P.-M. Robitaille, Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 87-97. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-33-14.PDF twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe. Sky Scholar will be releasing at least one video per week to make sure you don’t run out of content! Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more. These presentations are not endorsed by The Ohio State University. Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only. This channel is educational in nature. Astronomy links of interest: Space Weather: http://spaceweathernews.com/ NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/ NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/ NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/ NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/ SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/ SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ IRIS Satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/iris/index.html Hinode, JAXA/NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hinode/index.html Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/ National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/ 1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope: www.isf.astro.su.se/ All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA). Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra: http://vixra.org/author/pierre-marie_robitaille Outro Music: Foria: Break Away https://soundcloud.com/foria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUweq5FAcE
Views: 1765 Sky Scholar
Physics Letters | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics_Letters Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7170253930134601 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics Letters was a scientific journal published from 1962 to 1966, when it split in two series now published by Elsevier: Physics Letters A: condensed matter physics, theoretical physics, nonlinear science, statistical physics, mathematical and computational physics, general and cross-disciplinary physics (including foundations), atomic, molecular and cluster physics, plasma and fluid physics, optical physics, biological physics and nanoscience. Physics Letters B: nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, experimental high-energy physics, theoretical high-energy physics, and astrophysics.Physics Letters B is part of the SCOAP3 initiative.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Branches of physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Branches of physics 00:00:58 1 Classical mechanics 00:01:53 2 Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics 00:03:24 3 Electromagnetism and electronics 00:03:35 4 Relativity 00:05:00 5 Quantum mechanics 00:08:02 6 Optics, and atomic, molecular, and optical physics 00:08:33 7 Condensed matter physics 00:08:48 8 High energy/particle physics and nuclear physics 00:09:06 9 Cosmology 00:09:24 10 Interdisciplinary fields 00:10:35 11 Summary Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics deals with the combination of matter and energy. It also deals with a wide variety of systems, about which theories have been developed that are used by physicists. In general, theories are experimentally tested numerous times before they are accepted as correct as a description of Nature (within a certain domain of validity). For instance, the theory of classical mechanics accurately describes the motion of objects, provided they are much larger than atoms and moving at much less than the speed of light. These theories continue to be areas of active research: for instance, a remarkable aspect of classical mechanics known as chaos was discovered in the 20th century, three centuries after the original formulation of classical mechanics by Isaac Newton (1642–1727). These "central theories" are important tools for research in more specialized topics, and any physicist, regardless of his or her specialization, is expected to be literate in them.
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Working 1:1 - Aiden Bussey '09 and Kanwal Singh, physics faculty member at Sarah Lawrence College
 
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In Part 2 of the Working 1:1 video series, Aiden Bussey '09 and Kanwal Singh (physics) talk about their one-on-one class in modern physics, and Bussey's evolution from creative writing student to science star. Aiden Bussey '09 came to Sarah Lawrence intending to study creative writing, but soon got hooked on science and ended up studying advanced physics in a one-on-one course with Kanwal Singh. In one conference project, he studied Isaac Newton's work in pseudoscience (like alchemy) and the early relationship between modern science and mysticism. Now Aiden is preparing to pursue a career in reproductive science. Kanwal Singh earned a BS from the University of Maryland at College Park and a MS and PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. She was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Oslo in Norway. Her special interests include low-temperature physics, science education and education policy, and scientific and quantitative literacy. She's written articles in theoretical condensed-matter physics (models of superfluid systems) and physics teaching, and has taught at Middlebury College, Wellesley College, and Eugene Lang College at The New School University. She has taught at SLC since 2003. Related Links Science and Mathematics http://www.slc.edu/undergraduate/study/science-mathematics/index.html Physics http://www.slc.edu/undergraduate/study/science-mathematics/physics/index.html Courses taught by Kanwal Singh http://www.slc.edu/undergraduate/study/science-mathematics/physics/faculty.html#faculty-268
Numerical mathematics of quasicrystals – Pingwen Zhang – ICM2018
 
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Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing Invited Lecture 15.8 Numerical mathematics of quasicrystals Pingwen Zhang Abstract: Quasicrystals are one kind of fascinating aperiodic structures, and give a strong impact on material science, solid state chemistry, condensed matter physics and soft matters. The theory of quasicrystals, included in aperiodic order, has grown rapidly in mathematical and physical areas over the past few decades. Many scientific problems have been explored with the efforts of physicists and mathematicians. However, there are still lots of open problems which might to be solved by the close collaboration of physicists, mathematicians and computational mathematicians. In this article, we would like to bridge the physical quasicrystals and mathematical quasicrystals from the perspective of numerical mathematics. © International Congress of Mathematicians – ICM www.icm2018.org
Views: 68 Rio ICM2018
Physics Letters A | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics_Letters Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8809497297480193 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics Letters was a scientific journal published from 1962 to 1966, when it split in two series now published by Elsevier: Physics Letters A: condensed matter physics, theoretical physics, nonlinear science, statistical physics, mathematical and computational physics, general and cross-disciplinary physics (including foundations), atomic, molecular and cluster physics, plasma and fluid physics, optical physics, biological physics and nanoscience. Physics Letters B: nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, experimental high-energy physics, theoretical high-energy physics, and astrophysics.Physics Letters B is part of the SCOAP3 initiative.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Relaxation (physics) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relaxation_(physics) 00:00:24 1 Relaxation in simple linear systems 00:00:34 1.1 Mechanics: Damped unforced oscillator 00:02:08 1.2 Electronics: The RC circuit 00:03:14 2 Relaxation in condensed matter physics 00:03:50 2.1 Stress relaxation 00:04:09 2.2 Dielectric relaxation time 00:04:49 2.3 Liquids and amorphous solids 00:05:38 2.4 Spin relaxation in NMR 00:05:56 3 Chemical relaxation methods 00:06:41 4 Relaxation in atmospheric sciences 00:06:52 4.1 Desaturation of clouds 00:08:10 5 Relaxation in astronomy 00:08:37 6 See also 00:08:41 7 References 00:11:55 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8027232260037501 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In the physical sciences, relaxation usually means the return of a perturbed system into equilibrium. Each relaxation process can be categorized by a relaxation time τ. The simplest theoretical description of relaxation as function of time t is an exponential law exp(-t/τ).
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Quantization (physics) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantization_(physics) 00:00:40 1 Quantization methods 00:01:50 1.1 Canonical quantization 00:03:03 1.2 Quantization schemes 00:03:59 1.3 Covariant canonical quantization 00:05:11 1.4 Deformation quantization 00:05:21 1.5 Geometric quantization 00:08:10 1.6 Loop quantization 00:08:22 1.7 Path integral quantization 00:08:50 1.8 Quantum statistical mechanics approach 00:09:02 1.9 Schwinger's variational approach 00:09:15 2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In physics, quantization is the process of transition from a classical understanding of physical phenomena to a newer understanding known as quantum mechanics. (It is a procedure for constructing a quantum field theory starting from a classical field theory.) This is a generalization of the procedure for building quantum mechanics from classical mechanics. One also speaks of field quantization, as in the "quantization of the electromagnetic field", where one refers to photons as field "quanta" (for instance as light quanta). This procedure is basic to theories of particle physics, nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, and quantum optics.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Physics Letters B | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Physics Letters B Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics Letters was a scientific journal published from 1962 to 1966, when it split in two series now published by Elsevier: Physics Letters A: condensed matter physics, theoretical physics, nonlinear science, statistical physics, mathematical and computational physics, general and cross-disciplinary physics (including foundations), atomic, molecular and cluster physics, plasma and fluid physics, optical physics, biological physics and nanoscience. Physics Letters B: nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, experimental high-energy physics, theoretical high-energy physics, and astrophysics.Physics Letters B is part of the SCOAP3 initiative.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Quantum-circuit design for efficient simulations of many-body quantum dynamics
 
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Video abstract for the article 'Quantum-circuit design for efficient simulations of many-body quantum dynamics' by Sadegh Raeisi, Nathan Wiebe and Barry C Sanders (Sadegh Raeisi et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 103017). Read the full article in New Journal of Physics at http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/14/10/103017/article. GENERAL SCIENTIFIC SUMMARY Introduction and background. Quantum simulation is an important area of study within the field of quantum computing. Its aim is to provide accurate answers efficiently to computational questions concerning the dynamical evolution of states or the properties of the operators that induce the evolution. Many algorithms have been developed for standard (non-quantum) computers, but classical simulations are generically intractable. A quantum computer could, however, make valuable classes of computational problems tractable. As quantum simulation has a much lower time and space cost compared to the requirements for practical use of other quantum algorithms, it is currently undergoing intensive experimental study. Main results. We have developed a circuit-design algorithm for simulating a large class of physically relevant Hamiltonian evolutions. These Hamiltonians are sums of tensor products of Pauli spin operators. The circuit-design algorithm runs efficiently on a classical computer and yields a quantum-computer circuit that efficiently simulates the evolution of an arbitrary input state. For any small error tolerance for the output state, the resultant quantum circuit guarantees an output state within the specified tolerance, and the resource requirement is optimal in space and nearly optimal in time. In many cases the actual resource cost is much less than the resource bound, making the circuit even more feasible. Wider implications. Our efficient circuit-design algorithm will enable realizations of experimental quantum simulators for physically relevant Hamiltonians with guaranteed upper bounds on output-state errors. Such quantum simulators will be valuable in many areas, including condensed-matter physics and linear-equation solvers.
Views: 321 NewJournalofPhysics
Relativistic quantum field theory | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory 00:01:00 1 History 00:02:18 1.1 Theoretical background 00:08:58 1.2 Quantum electrodynamics 00:15:26 1.3 Infinities and renormalization 00:20:21 1.4 Non-renormalizability 00:23:29 1.5 Standard Model 00:27:37 1.6 Other developments 00:29:15 1.7 Condensed matter physics 00:30:51 2 Principles 00:31:13 2.1 Classical fields 00:39:33 2.2 Canonical quantisation 00:55:04 2.3 Path integrals 01:00:48 2.4 Two-point correlation function 01:13:57 2.5 Feynman diagram 01:20:12 2.6 Renormalisation 01:28:15 2.6.1 Renormalisation group 01:31:47 2.7 Other theories 01:34:27 2.7.1 Gauge symmetry 01:39:06 2.7.2 Spontaneous symmetry breaking 01:43:10 2.7.3 Supersymmetry 01:52:52 2.7.4 Other spacetimes 02:00:08 2.7.5 Topological quantum field theory 02:02:23 2.8 Perturbative and non-perturbative methods 02:02:32 3 Mathematical rigour 02:03:43 4 See also 02:04:28 5 References 02:06:15 6 Further reading 02:11:10 7 External links 02:11:28 Topological quantum field theory 02:11:39 The correlation functions and physical predictions of a QFT depend on the spacetime metric gμν. For a special class of QFTs called topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), all correlation functions are independent of continuous changes in the spacetime metric. QFTs in curved spacetime generally change according to the geometry (local structure) of the spacetime background, while TQFTs are invariant under spacetime diffeomorphisms but are sensitive to the topology (global structure) of spacetime. This means that all calculational results of TQFTs are topological invariants of the underlying spacetime. Chern–Simons theory is an example of TQFT. Applications of TQFT include the fractional quantum Hall effect and topological quantum computers. 02:12:49 Perturbative and non-perturbative methods 02:13:00 Using perturbation theory, the total effect of a small interaction term can be approximated order by order by a series expansion in the number of virtual particles participating in the interaction. Every term in the expansion may be understood as one possible way for (physical) particles to interact with each other via virtual particles, expressed visually using a Feynman diagram. The electromagnetic force between two electrons in QED is represented (to first order in perturbation theory) by the propagation of a virtual photon. In a similar manner, the W and Z bosons carry the weak interaction, while gluons carry the strong interaction. The interpretation of an interaction as a sum of intermediate states involving the exchange of various virtual particles only makes sense in the framework of perturbation theory. In contrast, non-perturbative methods in QFT treat the interacting Lagrangian as a whole without any series expansion. Instead of particles that carry interactions, these methods have spawned such concepts as 't Hooft–Polyakov monopole, domain wall, flux tube, and instanton. 02:14:31 Mathematical rigour 02:14:41 In spite of its overwhelming success in particle physics and condensed matter physics, QFT itself lacks a formal mathematical foundation. For example, according to Haag's theorem, there does not exist a well-defined interaction picture for QFT, which implies that perturbation theory of QFT, which underlies the entire Feynman diagram method, is fundamentally not rigorous.Since the 1950s, theoretical physicists and mathematicians have attempted to organise all QFTs into a set of axioms, in order to establish the existence of concrete models of relativistic QFT in a mathematically rigorous way and to study their properties. This line of study is called constructive quantum field theory, a subfield of mathematical physics, which has led to such results as CPT theorem, spin-statistics theorem, and Goldstone's theorem.Compared to ordinary QFT, topological quantum field theory and conformal field theory are better supported mathematically — both can be classified in the framework of representations of cobordisms.Algebraic quantum field theory is another approach to the axiomatisation of QFT, in which the fundamental objects are local operators and the algebraic relations between them. Axiomatic systems following this approach include Wightman axioms and Haag-Kastler axioms.:2-3 One way to construct theories satisfying Wightman axioms is to use Osterwalder-Schrader axioms, which give the necessary and sufficient conditions for a real time theory to be obtained from an imaginary time theory by analytic continuation (Wick rotation).:10Yang-Mills existence and mass gap, one of the Millenium Prize Problems, concerns the well-defined existence of Yang-Mills theories as set out by the above axioms. The full problem statement is as follows. Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way ...
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Conformal field theory | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Conformal field theory 00:00:36 1 Scale invariance vs. conformal invariance 00:01:16 2 Dimensional considerations 00:01:26 2.1 Two dimensions 00:06:59 2.2 More than two dimensions 00:07:34 3 Conformal symmetry 00:07:51 4 See also 00:08:17 5 References 00:10:26 6 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A conformal field theory (CFT) is a quantum field theory that is invariant under conformal transformations. In two dimensions, there is an infinite-dimensional algebra of local conformal transformations, and conformal field theories can sometimes be exactly solved or classified. Conformal field theory has important applications to condensed matter physics, statistical mechanics, quantum statistical mechanics, and string theory. Statistical and condensed matter systems are indeed often conformally invariant at their thermodynamic or quantum critical points.
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Lecture 1 | Condensed Matter (PSI 10/11, Review) - John Berlinsky (Perimeter) 2011.1.3 10:15
 
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Condensed Matter (PSI 10/11, Review, PHYS 637) - John Berlinsky (Perimeter Institute) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOF0olKcrQg0DnzwzFgGfwg Lecture 1 Basic concepts of Condensed Matter theory Lecture 2 Motion in a periodic potential Lecture 3 Nearly free electrons and tight-binding models Lecture 4 Tight binding bend structure and interactions between electrons Lecture 5 Hartree-Fock scattering Lecture 6 Landau Fermi liquid: excitation spectrum Lecture 7 Landau Fermi Liquid Parameters Lecture 8 Perturbations in the Fermi Liquid Lecture 9 Transport Properties Lecture 10 Superconductivity: Criteria for Super Fluid Flow Lecture 11 Origin of BCS Theory Lecture 12 Superconducting Gap Equation Lecture 13 Extended Hubbard Model Lecture 14 Nodal Superconductivity Lecture 15 Resonating Valence Bond States 《Perimeter Scholars International (PSI) 2010-2011》 Full Programme: ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbNXAC7m_862M_rqR0ErMo9B 1. Research Skills - Kari Dalnoki-Veress (McMaster) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbMO9anUx3wP9CebSg1MGVbD 2. Theoretical Physics - Nima Arkani-Hamed (IAS, Princeton) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbM8KVIFZjLBez8I7-__MYO0 3. Introduction to Complex Analysis (Maths and Mathematica) - Pedro Vieira (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPAorVAtIikGTOJxddrWeAI Core Topics (4)-(11): Foundational subjects. 4. Quantum Theory (PHYS 605) - Ben Schumacher (Kenyon College) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbMVHOjZRoIeX0f3GZzLSQxc 5. Relativity (PHYS 604) - Neil Turok (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOlETEi6Sn2I_pB0F82GVwK 6. Quantum Field Theory I (PHYS 601) - Konstantin Zarembo (Nordita & Uppsala) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbNSHUNiMwx_Ttdqeg7ZcXQx 7. Statistical Mechanics (PHYS 602) - Leo Kadanoff (Chicago) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbMwwR3af3Q7TzjPawxbyKtV 8. Quantum Field Theory II (PHYS 603) - Francois David (CEA, Saclay) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbN5eKS_Sukb3H7AOke04j-v 9. Scientific Computation (PHYS 608) - Erik Sorensen (McMaster) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPR96rqrztrTQnbd0zCt21q 10. Mathematical Physics (PHYS 624) - Carl Bender (Washington) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbMpEGXv97bohLxTUvWntpCh 11. Conformal Field Theory (PHYS 609) - Jaume Gomis & Eleonora Dell'Aquila (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOQtreDpqYWAFEik6OXAEcS Reviews (12)-(20): Subdisciplinary subjects. 12. Standard Model (PHYS 622) - Michael Peskin (Stanford) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbNO7m_CQ7jnSOgVRcLKOAru 13. Condensed Matter (PHYS 637) - John Berlinsky (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOF0olKcrQg0DnzwzFgGfwg 14. Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (PHYS 639) - Robert Spekkens (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOZRAnHwQPQAtSTY1o-zK64 15. Gravitational Physics (PHYS 636) - Ruth Gregory (Durham) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOJxn0zQ6v72KxdgF5VjQSK 16. Quantum Gravity (PHYS 638) - Renate Loll (Radboud) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbNVzHF1DlViGFFE3YZkvZmV 17. Cosmology (PHYS 621) - Latham Boyle (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOr664h4Y7iY01po3pWy1dD 18. Quantum Information (PHYS 635) - Daniel Gottesman (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPBSRSLryJ1HD33uCCkLPbd 19. String Theory (PHYS 623) - Freddy Cachazo (Perimeter) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbP0UzIEBIAHcrEOuz7nMItD 20. Beyond the Standard Model (PHYS 777) - Veronica Sanz-Gonzalez (York) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPKNf6iFhkj4UsR6QyUKSIX Explorations (21)-(26): 21. Explorations in Quantum Information (PHYS 641) - David Cory (Waterloo) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOwAEGVvJ6lTc-mtuonZgi_ 22. Explorations in Condensed Matter - Tami Pereg-Barnea (McGill) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbOpSBR1EkZ0vxkZQaqyriOV 23. Explorations in String Theory (PHYS 647) - Pedro Vieira (Perimeter), John McGreevy (UCSD) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbMjQ_2sy5ZrxHDj0Rhhxd9k 24. Explorations in Cosmology (PHYS 649) - Andrew Tolley (Imperial College), Sarah Shandera (Penn State) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPxXdImPjDSh5khlOC9w4-s 25. Explorations in Particle Theory (PHYS 646) - Philip Schuster (Perimeter), Natalia Toro (Stanford) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbONYOc-yEmetpaSJYas986z 26. Explorations in Numerical Relativity (PHYS 642) - Luis Lehner (Perimeter), Scott Noble (Tulsa) ▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFMKfDJ8QzbPiPdu2u9MTWIobxLnpWuvz
Lattice model (physics) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lattice_model_(physics) 00:02:28 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8203227179456102 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In physics, a lattice model is a physical model that is defined on a lattice, as opposed to the continuum of space or spacetime. Lattice models originally occurred in the context of condensed matter physics, where the atoms of a crystal automatically form a lattice. Currently, lattice models are quite popular in theoretical physics, for many reasons. Some models are exactly solvable, and thus offer insight into physics beyond what can be learned from perturbation theory. Lattice models are also ideal for study by the methods of computational physics, as the discretization of any continuum model automatically turns it into a lattice model. Examples of lattice models in condensed matter physics include the Ising model, the Potts model, the XY model, the Toda lattice. The exact solution to many of these models (when they are solvable) includes the presence of solitons. Techniques for solving these include the inverse scattering transform and the method of Lax pairs, the Yang-Baxter equation and quantum groups. The solution of these models has given insights into the nature of phase transitions, magnetization and scaling behaviour, as well as insights into the nature of quantum field theory. Physical lattice models frequently occur as an approximation to a continuum theory, either to give an ultraviolet cutoff to the theory to prevent divergences or to perform numerical computations. An example of a continuum theory that is widely studied by lattice models is the QCD lattice model, a discretization of quantum chromodynamics. However, digital physics considers nature fundamentally discrete at the Planck scale, which imposes upper limit to the density of information, aka Holographic principle. More generally, lattice gauge theory and lattice field theory are areas of study. Lattice models are also used to simulate the structure and dynamics of polymers. Examples include the bond fluctuation model and the 2nd model.
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Evidence of Solar Structure: Sunspots, Granules, Faculae, and Limb Darkening!
 
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twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo References: 1. P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block. Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 4, 90-142. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-35-16.PDF 2. P.M. Robitaille, Magnetic Fields and Directional Spectral Emissivity in Sunspots and Faculae: Complimentary Evidence of Metallic Behavior on the Surface of the Sun. Progr. Phys. 2013, v. 1, 19-24. http://ptep-online.com/2013/PP-32-05.PDF 3. P.M. Robitaille, On Solar Granulations, Limb Darkening, and Sunspots: Brief Insights in Remembrance of Father Angelo Secchi. Progr. Phys. 2011, v. 3, 79-88. http://ptep-online.com/2011/PP-26-09.PDF 4. H.C. Spruit, Pressure equilibrium and energy balance of small photospheric fluxtubes. Solar Physics, 1976, v. 50, 269–295. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1976SoPh...50..269S 5. S.R. Walton, Flux tube models of solar plages. Astrophys. J., 1987, v. 312, 909–929. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1987ApJ...312..909W 6. Wilson A. Observations on the solar spots. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc., 1774, v. 64, 1–30. http://rstl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/64/1.full.pdf+html 7. Video of Granules, 1 m Swedish Solar Telescope, Institute for Solar Physics, http://www.isf.astro.su.se 8. Facula: https://www.nasa.gov/images/content/591688main_ar1302-092411.jpg Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe. Sky Scholar will be releasing at least one video per week to make sure you don’t run out of content! Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., is a professor of radiology at The Ohio State University. He also holds an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. This brought on the need to question fundamental aspects of thermal physics, including ideas related to Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, and more. These presentations are not endorsed by The Ohio State University. Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only. This channel is educational in nature. Astronomy links of interest: Space Weather: http://spaceweathernews.com/ NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/ NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/ NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/ NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/ SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/ SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ IRIS Satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/iris/index.html Hinode, JAXA/NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hinode/index.html Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/ National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/ 1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope: www.isf.astro.su.se/ All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA). Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra: http://vixra.org/author/pierre-marie_robitaille Outro Music: Foria: Break Away https://soundcloud.com/foria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUweq5FAcE
Views: 4526 Sky Scholar
Institute of Solid State Physics (Russia) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_of_Solid_State_Physics_(Russia) 00:00:34 1 About the institute 00:03:05 2 Laboratories Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8119650836295166 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP; Russian: Институт физики твердого тела) of the Russian Academy of Sciences is a research institution, located in the small town of Chernogolovka near Moscow in Russia. Founded on February 15, 1963, the institute has grown to become one of the largest physics institutes in the country. Its main fields of research are condensed matter physics and materials science.
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Physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics 00:01:34 1 History 00:01:43 1.1 Ancient astronomy 00:02:59 1.2 Natural philosophy 00:03:41 1.3 Physics in the medieval European and Islamic world 00:07:43 1.4 Classical physics 00:09:15 1.5 Modern physics 00:10:57 2 Philosophy 00:12:42 3 Core theories 00:13:50 3.1 Classical physics 00:15:54 3.2 Modern physics 00:17:33 3.3 Difference between classical and modern physics 00:18:53 4 Relation to other fields 00:19:03 4.1 Prerequisites 00:21:45 4.2 Application and influence 00:23:44 5 Research 00:23:52 5.1 Scientific method 00:24:38 5.2 Theory and experiment 00:26:25 5.3 Scope and aims 00:28:11 5.4 Research fields 00:29:06 5.4.1 Nuclear and particle physics 00:30:46 5.4.2 Atomic, molecular, and optical physics 00:32:11 5.4.3 Condensed matter physics 00:33:40 5.4.4 Astrophysics 00:36:26 6 Current research 00:39:15 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics (from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves.Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.
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Relativistic quantum theory | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory 00:00:49 1 History 00:01:53 1.1 Theoretical background 00:07:17 1.2 Quantum electrodynamics 00:12:32 1.3 Infinities and renormalization 00:16:33 1.4 Non-renormalizability 00:19:08 1.5 Standard Model 00:22:30 1.6 Other developments 00:23:51 1.7 Condensed matter physics 00:25:10 2 Principles 00:25:29 2.1 Classical fields 00:32:06 2.2 Canonical quantisation 00:44:17 2.3 Path integrals 00:48:52 2.4 Two-point correlation function 00:59:16 2.5 Feynman diagram 01:04:16 2.6 Renormalisation 01:10:43 2.6.1 Renormalisation group 01:13:33 2.7 Other theories 01:15:45 2.7.1 Gauge symmetry 01:19:29 2.7.2 Spontaneous symmetry breaking 01:22:44 2.7.3 Supersymmetry 01:30:26 2.7.4 Other spacetimes 01:36:09 2.7.5 Topological quantum field theory 01:38:00 2.8 Perturbative and non-perturbative methods 01:38:08 3 Mathematical rigour 01:39:05 4 See also 01:39:43 5 References 01:41:09 6 Further reading 01:45:06 7 External links 01:45:21 Topological quantum field theory 01:45:31 The correlation functions and physical predictions of a QFT depend on the spacetime metric gμν. For a special class of QFTs called topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), all correlation functions are independent of continuous changes in the spacetime metric. QFTs in curved spacetime generally change according to the geometry (local structure) of the spacetime background, while TQFTs are invariant under spacetime diffeomorphisms but are sensitive to the topology (global structure) of spacetime. This means that all calculational results of TQFTs are topological invariants of the underlying spacetime. Chern–Simons theory is an example of TQFT. Applications of TQFT include the fractional quantum Hall effect and topological quantum computers. 01:46:27 Perturbative and non-perturbative methods 01:46:38 Using perturbation theory, the total effect of a small interaction term can be approximated order by order by a series expansion in the number of virtual particles participating in the interaction. Every term in the expansion may be understood as one possible way for (physical) particles to interact with each other via virtual particles, expressed visually using a Feynman diagram. The electromagnetic force between two electrons in QED is represented (to first order in perturbation theory) by the propagation of a virtual photon. In a similar manner, the W and Z bosons carry the weak interaction, while gluons carry the strong interaction. The interpretation of an interaction as a sum of intermediate states involving the exchange of various virtual particles only makes sense in the framework of perturbation theory. In contrast, non-perturbative methods in QFT treat the interacting Lagrangian as a whole without any series expansion. Instead of particles that carry interactions, these methods have spawned such concepts as 't Hooft–Polyakov monopole, domain wall, flux tube, and instanton. 01:47:51 Mathematical rigour 01:48:01 In spite of its overwhelming success in particle physics and condensed matter physics, QFT itself lacks a formal mathematical foundation. For example, according to Haag's theorem, there does not exist a well-defined interaction picture for QFT, which implies that perturbation theory of QFT, which underlies the entire Feynman diagram method, is fundamentally not rigorous.Since the 1950s, theoretical physicists and mathematicians have attempted to organise all QFTs into a set of axioms, in order to establish the existence of concrete models of relativistic QFT in a mathematically rigorous way and to study their properties. This line of study is called constructive quantum field theory, a subfield of mathematical physics, which has led to such results as CPT theorem, spin-statistics theorem, and Goldstone's theorem.Compared to ordinary QFT, topological quantum field theory and conformal field theory are better supported mathematically — both can be classified in the framework of representations of cobordisms.Algebraic quantum field theory is another approach to the axiomatisation of QFT, in which the fundamental objects are local operators and the algebraic relations between them. Axiomatic systems following this approach include Wightman axioms and Haag-Kastler axioms.:2-3 One way to construct theories satisfying Wightman axioms is to use Osterwalder-Schrader axioms, which give the necessary and sufficient conditions for a real time theory to be obtained from an imaginary time theory by analytic continuation (Wick rotation).:10Yang-Mills existence and mass gap, one of the Millenium Prize Problems, concerns the well-defined existence of Yang-Mills theories as set out by the above axioms. The full problem statement is as follows. Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way ...
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MIT Center for Theoretical Physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIT_Center_for_Theoretical_Physics Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8942036802460714 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The MIT Center for Theoretical Physics (CTP) is a subdivision of MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics. The CTP is a unified research and teaching center focused on fundamental physics. CTP activities range from string theory and cosmology at the highest energies down through unification and beyond-the-standard-model physics, through the standard model, to QCD, hadrons, quark matter, and nuclei at the low energy scale. Members of the CTP are also currently working on quantum computation and on energy policy. The breadth and depth of research in nuclear, particle, string, and gravitational physics at the CTP makes it a unique environment for researchers in these fields. In addition to the 15 MIT faculty members working in the CTP, at any one time there are roughly a dozen postdoctoral fellows, and as many, or more, long-term visitors working at the postdoctoral or faculty level. The CTP supports 25-35 MIT graduate students, who work with the faculty and postdocs on problems across the energy spectrum. Current research areas in the center include particle physics, Cosmology, String theory, Phenomenology beyond the standard model, standard model, quantum field theory, lattice QCD, condensed matter physics, quantum computing, and Energy research. Notable current faculty include Frank Wilczek, Jeffrey Goldstone, Roman Jackiw, Alan Guth, Max Tegmark, Isadore Singer, Peter Shor, Daniel Freedman, Robert Jaffe and Allan Adams
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
A K Raychaudhuri - Ferromagnetic insulating state : Is it an electron glass
 
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PROGRAM: The ICTS Condensed Matter Programme 2011 Venue: Indian Insitute of Science, Bangalore Date: Friday 09 Dec, 2011 - Thursday 22 Dec, 2011 DESCRIPTION: The ICTS Condensed Matter Programme 2011 (ICMP 2011) consists of a 10 day Winter School (December 9 to December 18) followed by a 4 day International Conference (December 19 to December 22), both to be held in IISc. Bangalore. The school will have four lecture courses focusing on the core of modern condensed matter physics, while the conference will feature four days of talks at the very forefront of our subject, delivered by a cross-section of internationally eminent speakers. The school will also feature tutorial lectures, evening colloquia and a few research seminars. PROGRAM LINK: http://www.icts.res.in/program/ICMP2011
Physics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Physics 00:01:34 1 History 00:01:43 1.1 Ancient astronomy 00:02:59 1.2 Natural philosophy 00:03:39 1.3 Physics in the medieval European and Islamic world 00:07:41 1.4 Classical physics 00:09:14 1.5 Modern physics 00:10:55 2 Philosophy 00:12:40 3 Core theories 00:13:47 3.1 Classical physics 00:15:51 3.2 Modern physics 00:17:30 3.3 Difference between classical and modern physics 00:18:50 4 Relation to other fields 00:19:00 4.1 Prerequisites 00:21:41 4.2 Application and influence 00:23:40 5 Research 00:23:49 5.1 Scientific method 00:24:35 5.2 Theory and experiment 00:26:23 5.3 Scope and aims 00:28:08 5.4 Research fields 00:29:03 5.4.1 Nuclear and particle physics 00:30:43 5.4.2 Atomic, molecular, and optical physics 00:32:07 5.4.3 Condensed matter physics 00:33:36 5.4.4 Astrophysics 00:36:23 6 Current research 00:39:12 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physics (from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves.Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.
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Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Physics_and_Chemistry_of_Solids 00:00:33 Abstracting and indexing Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8458222884238169 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids is a peer-reviewed scientific journal of condensed matter physics and material science. The journal is edited by M. Azuma, A. Bansil, H.-P. Cheng, and K. Prassides. The journal was established in 1957 by Harvey Brooks, and is published monthly by Elsevier. In 1963 the Letters section of the journal split to form Solid State Communications.
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