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Hazards Coal Identification: Mine Health and Safety Council
 
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Training Video on the improvement of barring down practices in underground Coal mine.
Views: 8554 MINE
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
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In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 28318 markdcatlin
Mines Act 1952 | Video No 1| Committee | With MCQ | In HINDI |
 
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Mines Act 1952 | Video no 1| Committee | With MCQ | I HINDI | THIS INCLUDES SERIES OF MINES ACT 1952 REGULATION WITH EXPLANATION IN HINDI This video will be helpful for computer based examination CBT conducted online by DGMS for Mines mate, mines surveyor, mines foreman, mines overman, mines manager second class coal and metal , restricted and unrestricted, mines manager first class coal and metal , restricted and unrestricted, CURRENTLY IN THIS VIDEO Introduction to Mines Act 1952 Act not apply in certain cases CHAPTER – III ‘COMMITTEES’ CONSTITUTION OF COMMITTEES Functions of the committee Powers, etc. of the Committees Recovery of expenses QUIZ are covered. Subscribe to our channel for more details and videos. if you like our service pl like this video or subscribe our youtube channel.
Views: 42883 Mining Video
Black Lung Disease Coal Dust Occupational Disease 1980 MSHA
 
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In the last decade, over 10,000 miners have died of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or what is commonly called black lung disease.1 Black lung disease, which is caused by inhaling coal mine dust, results in scarring of the lungs and emphysema, shortness of breath, disability, and premature death. While the prevalence of black lung disease had decreased by about 90% from 1969 to 1995 following the enactment of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, the downward trend of this disease in coal miners has stopped. Since 1995, the prevalence of black lung cases has more than doubled. Many current underground miners (some as young as in their 30s) are developing severe and advanced cases. Identification of advanced cases among miners under age 50 is of particular concern, as they were exposed to coal-mine dust in the years after implementation of the disease prevention measures mandated by the 1969 federal legislation. An increased risk of pneumoconiosis has also been associated with work in certain mining jobs, in smaller mines, in several geographic areas, and among contract miners. For more information, go to the NIOSH Science Blog at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/blog/nsb081808_blacklung.html . This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 22135 markdcatlin
In Memory Of All  Coal Miners
 
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¥T ...and in honour of the 1 man who survived the 2006 Sago coal mine disaster,Randall McCloy.You will see him seated onstage to the right of President Bush in the beginning. On June 15th,2006 President George W.Bush signed into law S. 2803, The MINER Act. Partial text: I appreciate the workers who are here. Thanks for taking time in your day to come. I want to welcome the families of those who mourn the loss of life. We share in your grief, and we honor the memories of your loved ones. I know it's hard. It's really hard for you. But we welcome you here. And we're honored you took time to be here. I appreciate members of my administration who have joined us, as well, today. The hard work of American miners provides us with really important fuel. This economy is growing because of the work of our miners. Coal is an important part of our nation's present and future. Thanks to modern technology and equipment, we've come a long way from the days when a miner would take a canary into the coal mines. Passage -- and since the passage of the Mine Safety and Health Act in '77 -- 1977, America has seen significant decreases of injuries and fatal mining accidents. Yet events in recent months have reminded us that mining is dangerous work. That's what we've seen. This year alone, accidents have taken the lives of 33 miners in our country. Just last month, five miners were killed in a mine explosion in Harlan County, Kentucky. And in January, Americans watched and prayed -- a lot of Americans prayed -- with the people of West Virginia for the 13 miners that were trapped underground by the explosion in the Sago mine. Only one man came out, and he's with us today -- Randal McCloy, and his wife, Anna. And we welcome you all. And we know -- we know, and I hope you know -- that your fallen mining brothers are with us here today in spirit. They're with us today with their loved ones here -- eyes wet with tears, but proud of their accomplishments. We're glad you're here. We honor the memory of all lost miners today; that's what we're doing signing this bill. We make this promise to American miners and their families: We'll do everything possible to prevent mine accidents and make sure you're able to return safely to your loved ones. The bill I'm about to sign is an important part of the effort. The MINER Act will build on the Mine Safety and Health Administration's ongoing efforts to enhance mine safety training, to improve safety and communications technology for miners and provide more emergency supplies of breathable air along escape routes. This new legislation will require mine operators to report any life-threatening accident no later than 15 minutes after they know that one has occurred. And to ensure compliance with the law, the MINER Act will increase the maximum penalty for flagrant violations of mine safety regulations nearly four-fold. To implement this new legislation, we need effective and experienced leadership at the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Last month, I named, or nominated Richard Stickler of the state of West Virginia to be the head of MSHA. He's got experience. He served for six years as the Director of Pennsylvania's Bureau of Deep Mine Safety. He was a miner, mine shift foreman, a superintendent, and a manager, and the Senate needs to confirm Richard Stickler to this key position. America's miners work hard every day to support their families and support this country. It's hard work. You deserve the best training, the best equipment and safeguards that we can provide to protect the lives. And this good legislation I'm signing today is an important part of honoring that commitment. May God bless you all. May God bless our miners and their families, and may God continue to bless our country.
Views: 3998 AuroraKismet
Miners’ Rights and Responsibilities
 
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MINER’S RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES summarizes the rights and responsibilities granted by the 1977 Federal Mine Safety Act to miners, their representatives and applicants in mine related jobs.
Views: 657 CaliforniaDIR
Mines Safety & Inspection Act, section 44
 
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A short discussion about section 44 of the Mines Safety & Inspection Act (WA), and what it means in practice. The presentation also discusses section 44 in the context of supervisor obligations for safety and health.
Views: 585 Greg Smith
Mine Safety Video -- ACCOLADE Wireless Mesh Communications System
 
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Video shows how the L-3 ACCOLADE Wireless Mesh Communications System works in coal mining operations. This MSHA-approved, integrated wireless communications and tracking system is compliant with the safety requirements of the 2006 MINER Act and MSHA policy guidance. It also enhances day-to-day mining operations with its ability to provide direct communications to all employees and link into existing mine systems. It provides a self-healing, redundant and survivable data network allowing voice and text peer-to-peer communication among mining personnel underground, as well as between below- and above-ground personnel. (Video produced by Mullin/Ashley Associates, Inc., http://www.mullinashley.com).
TRAINING ON MINES SAFETY
 
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Mining comprises of hazardous operations and requires specific Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) to protect the entire body from any harm or injury in the mining environment. Using PPEs requires hazard awareness and training. "Training on Mines Safety" is a short video on one of the the intensive training workshops provided by Code of Responsible Extraction (CORE) team.
Views: 144 Solidaridad Asia
MSHA Training for Surface Miners
 
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Stay safe on the mine. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) oversees the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to make sure that safety and health standards are maintained. Whether you’re new, experienced or need refresher training, be in compliance with MSHA requirements based on the Title 30 CFR - Part 46 regulations. Here’s what surface miners and surface mining contractors need to know!
Views: 51583 OSHAcampus.com
Mines rule 1955- Safety Committee
 
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Mines rule 1955- Safety Committee
Mining Equipment Safety Inspections
 
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This mining video focuses on MSHA's standard 14.100. This standard covers: safety defects, examination, correction and records in the work place.
Coal mine -Safety indication avoid Accidents 3d character animation in , madurai,india.
 
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Mines Act 1952 Chapter 1
 
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A descriptive video covering explanations of Mine's Act 1952. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 13227 ZEROTOINFINITYY
Open Pit Mining and the Missouri Blasting Safety Act
 
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Blasting is an activity associated with open pit mining of industrial minerals in Missouri. There has been confusion among the public about who to contact concerning blasting at an industrial mineral open pit mine site. The misconception is that the Land Reclamation Program regulates blasting at open pit industrial mineral mine sites. Blasting at industrial mineral open pit mine sites is regulated by the Missouri Division of Fire Safety, Missouri Blasting Safety Act. Therefore, the Land Reclamation Program created a video to inform the public about land reclamation requirements for open pit mining operations as well as information about the Missouri Blasting Safety Act and the Missouri Division of Fire Safety. This video helps to clarify the distinction between Land Reclamation Program and Missouri Division of Fire Safety roles at industrial mineral open pit mine operations. http://dnr.mo.gov/env/lrp/ Acknowledgements: Idea creator: Mr. Don Cripe, Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Video Production Manager: Mr. Andrew Richmond, Missouri Department of Natural Resources. On-camera individuals: Beth Aubuchon, Land Reclamation Program. Bill Zieres, Missouri Division of Fire Safety; Gary Veltrop, Capital Quarries. Special thanks to: Capital Quarries, Chris Thiltgen, Keith Henderson, Buckley Powder.
House Democrats Introduce Updated Mine Safety Legislation
 
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At a May 16, 2006 Capitol Hill press conference, Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives introduced comprehensive legislation to improve safety in America's coal mines. The lawmakers were joined by family members of miners killed in the explosion at the Sago Mine in Upshur County, West Virginia, in January 2006.
Views: 539 Politicstv
Injury as par Mines Act 1952
 
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reportable injury means any injury other than a serious bodily injury which involves, or in all probability will involve, the enforced absence of the injured persons from work for a period of seventy-two hours or more. “serious bodily injury” means any injury which involves; or in probability will involve the permanent loss of any part or section of a body or the use of any part or section of a body, or the permanent loss of or injury to the sight or hearing or any permanent physical incapacity or the fracture of any bone or one or more joints or bones of any phalanges of hand or foot.
Views: 1566 Mining Video
Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers 1978 Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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more at http://quickfound.net "Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 4780 Jeff Quitney
Mining law lecture 2016
 
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A lecture on mining and EIA law in Queensland, Australia, delivered at the University of Queensland by Dr Chris McGrath on 7 April 2016. The lecture examines the Carmichael Coal Mine.
Views: 1831 Chris McGrath
Regulating coal mining and reclamation in the U.S. - SMCRA and OSMRE
 
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OSMRE (Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement) - http://www.osmre.gov - was established under The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977 - http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/uscode/30/25 This clip is from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaUPOI... (23 minutes) A Page In Time - Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 1996 - Publication VID-009 - A video describing how the Surface Mining Law is implemented. === Optimism on Strip-Mine Law On the first anniversary of the Federal strip-mining law, there is hope that voluntary commitments by the top coal companies will help set the pace for compliance with the controversial environmental legislation. By Ben A. Franklin, Special to The New York Times, August 5, 1978 (Excerpts) But the conviction is growing that the bitterly controversial strip-mining law enacted a year ago to regulate how the earth is torn up and replaced to minimize environmental disruption stands a fair chance of working. In the agency assigned to administer the law, the Interior Department's new Office of Surface Mining, the reasons cited include the voluntary commitment of top executives of two big Appalachian strippers, the Pittson Company and the Falcon Coal Company, to work toward a pace-setting model of compliance in the Eastern mountain region where the enforcement problems of the office are the fiercest. Although the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, one of the decades's major environmental measures, became law August 3, 1977, and became effective last May, the surface-mining office was held to bare skeleton of a staff borrowed from other agencies for seven months. Its first appropriation was tied up in Congress from August 1977 to last March [1978]. [The initial 28 federal inspectors were not hired until 4/9/1978; provision of the law became effective on 2/2/1978, on new coal mining operations.] So the agency's staff is still short-handed. Environmental regulations that are the cutting edge of the law are months late in publication. And of the 200 Federal strip-mine inspectors authorized, only 61 are on board. [More than half of these still being trained and not yet authorized to do inspections.] One small striper in Ohio who failed during a two-week grace period to react correctly to a routine Federal mine inspector's citation for lack of required mine roadway signs -- in effect the mine had been given a "traffic ticket" or warning -- has learned the consequences of "willful failure to comply": a mine closure order and a $750-a-day fine that may total $1500. The fine is mandatory under the law. As of last week, strip-mine operators were still learning. In 337 Federal inspections since May 4, [1978] there have been 97 notices of violations or warnings and 33 cessation orders or closures for flagrant disregard -- a noncompliance rate of 38 percent. --- COAL SURFACE MINING AND RECLAMATION: An Environmental and Economic Assessment of Alternatives (U.S. Senate report, March 1973) http://groups.google.com/group/bob-mooney/web/1973-senate-report --- Investigation: Enforcement of Strip Mining Laws, 1975 http://groups.google.com/group/bob-mooney/web/cspi-enforcement-of-strip-mining-laws-1975 (Excerpt from an editorial in The Washington Post, 1/8/1976) Because inspectors are responsible for so many operations, many sites are rarely visited. Inspections are conducted as quick surveys instead of thorough investigations...As a result of political appointments and poor field training programs, inspectors often lack the necessary technical skills for detecting violations. When an inspector is highly skilled, mining interests often lure him away with a 200 or 300 percent salary increase. Many blatant violations are never reported to the state central enforcement office. A wide variety of industry favors are available to cooperative inspectors. On the other hand, some diligent inspectors have encountered personal threats and beatings. The study has created controversy in the coalfields as could have been predicted; any suggestion that coal companies are something less than public-spirited citizens rushing to save America in the energy crisis is sure to be met in some quarters with hostile criticism. It is significant, though, that soon after the study's appearance, Kentucky's highest-ranking strip mine official was fired. In Washington, Rep. John Seiberling (D-Ohio) believes that "this study gives us the ammunition to write effective legislation." That may well be needed, considering that this year's [1976] effort to get strip mining provisions added onto another bill have almost been spent. If anything, the documentation of coalfield abuses strengthens the case for strong federal controls. --- OSMRE in its early years -- Interivew with regional director Ed Imhoff, 1980 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLg_MywIiKY
Views: 4625 rhmooney3
Underground Coal Mines
 
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Underground Coal Mine
Views: 338526 vivek khodiyar
Flame as an Early Fire Detector in Mines
 
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This was clipped from the 1965 training film, Magic of Fire (23 minutes), produced by the US Bureau of Mines. By the early nineteenth century it had become known that firedamp became explosive when the flammable gas concentration was between approximately 5 and 15% by volume. On 25 May 1812 an explosion occurred at Felling Colliery, near Gateshead-on-Tyne, killing ninety-two men and boys. Reports of the circumstances behind this accident had such an impact on a London barrister published proposals for the formation of a society to consider ways of preventing such incidents. Called the Sunderland Society its first meeting was held on 1 October 1813. The main result of their deliberations was the invention by Sir Humphrey Davy, working under their auspices, of his now famous flame safety lamp. Despite the introduction of flame safety lamps into coal mines, explosions of firedamp remained a significant problem. Although no formal accident statistics were collected at the time, the number occurring seemingly continued along a rising trend that had been apparent before the Sunderland Society began its deliberations. Responding to this, in 1834 a petition was introduced before Parliament requesting that action be taken to do something about the situation. In response the House of Commons set up a Select Committee to study the occurrence of accidents in coal mines. Over the next four years it is probable that over three hundred coal miners died in explosions. Despite this, still no official action was taken in an attempt to prevent such from occurring. In June 1839 fifty-two men and boys were killed in an explosion at St Hilda Colliery, County Durham. A member of the local community was so moved that he suggested that a committee be formed to study the prevention of accidents in coal mines. The group was called the South Shields Committee. As a review of coal mining practices and safety, the report subsequently produced must be seen as a classic. Unlike any of the earlier reports into coal mine accidents, that of the South Shields Committee included a detailed discussion of how scientific instruments could be used to improve safety. The first Coal Mines Act was passed in 1850. This created a Mines Inspectorate with the power to enter any workings and advise the manager of any dangerous conditions found therein. It also required that all fatal accidents be reported to the Home Office within twenty-four hours of occurring. For the first time, this allowed an accurate assessment to be made of the causes of death amongst coal miners. This is taken from the 2007 paper, The Measurement of Air Flow in British Coal Mines: A Historical Review by I. D. Unwin, M. Phil, B.Sc., D.I.S., and available at: http://www.angelfire.com/mech/ians_coal_page/air_flow_2007.pdf
Views: 3163 markdcatlin
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 7055 Jo
Abandoned Mined Land (AML) reclamation program for former coal mines
 
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A national program to remediate safety and environmental hazards from past coal mining was created by the passage of federal law -- The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). SMCRA, Title 4, Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/uscode/30/25/IV The administering agency is the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE or OSM) within the U.S. Department of the Interior. See: http://www.osmre.gov/aml/AML.shtm More about SMCRA and OSMRE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uq7YI8AHnQ Abandoned Mines: Stay out, stay alive: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EsZqik612U (I was with OSM from April 1978 to May 1995; this helped get me to leave): On the night of March 4, 1995, an entire eastbound lane of Interstate 70 in Guernsey County, Ohio suddenly collapsed into a 10-foot crater swallowing a car and nearly several others plus a semi-truck --- the entire interstate being closed for six months until $4.4 million in repairs were made. On September 15, 1994, Robert Mooney, an acting field director for the federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, had sent the state a letter expressing concern for a worsening situation. The state ignored his request for an investigation of voids in the abandoned coal mines beneath the highway. More: http://groups.google.com/group/bob-mooney/web/i-70-collapse 1/13/2011 - Interstate-72 bridge damaged by mine subsidence http://www.sj-r.com/carousel/x512656240/I-72-bridge-damaged-by-mine-subsidence (Excerpts) A routine bridge inspection last fall showed damage from mine subsidence under the bridge on the east side of the river, said Illinois Department of Transportation spokesman Josh Kauffman. He said the subsidence has had "a very slight impact" on the bridge, which was built in 1974. "It is still able to carry the loads it was built for," Kauffman said. "It is a very small dip." IDOT is coordinating efforts with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources' Office of Mines and Minerals. "We have devised a plan to stabilize the structure by drilling a series of bore holes to the depth of the abandoned mine and injecting a concrete grout mixture to fill any voids left from coal mining operations," Kauffman said. Department of Natural Resources spokesman Chris McCloud said the agency's Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation Division said a DNR contractor will be at the bridge Monday, weather permitting, to begin filling the area east of the river with concrete. Underground coal mine fires: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxlykI9WSGI This clip is from A Page in Time (1996): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpDwRYy7BYg
Views: 4022 rhmooney3
The Hierachy of Legislation - QCMS&H
 
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www.opencutexaminer.com A short video to discuss/explain the Hierarchy of the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation for people studing their Certificate IV in Surface Coal Mining (OCE) made with ezvid, free download at http://ezvid.com
Coal Mine Tour Safety Survey -Univeristy of Kentucky Occupational Medicine
 
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This video features mixed footage from a coal mine safety and occupational health evaluation -Univeristy of Kentucky
Mine Safety Minute  Impoundment Tips
 
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Take a minute to learn more about safety at impoundments.
Views: 77 VA DMME
COAL MINE REGULATION 2017,REGULATION NO. 5.
 
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Thank you for watching my video plz like comment and share my video.
Views: 85 Mining India
1968 Farmington Mine Disaster (West Virginia State Archives)
 
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On November 20, 1968, Consolidated Coal Company's Number 9 Mine in Farmington, WV exploded, resulting in the deaths of 78 miners. The disaster led to mine safety reforms; President Nixon signed the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969 on December 30, 1969. This video is property of West Virginia State Archives and published on the Charleston Daily Mail's YouTube channel with express consent. Original source: http://www.wvculture.org/history/av.html
Who or What is an Open Cut Examiner?
 
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Who or what is an Open Cut Examiner? https://www.opencutexaminer.com/who-or-what-is-an-oce/ [email protected] WHO OR WHAT IS AN OPEN CUT EXAMINER? (DEFINITION) An OCE is an ‘experienced coal mine worker’ who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation. Eg QCMS&H Act 1999 – Section 59 Additional requirements for management of surface mines A site senior executive must appoint a person holding an open cut examiner’s certificate of competency to carry out the responsibilities and duties prescribed under a regulation in 1 or more surface mine excavations. The role and responsibilities of an Open Cut Examiner are defined in the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Regulations 2001. This is where the primary or main role/responsibility is found. QCMS&H Regulations 2001 – Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner Section 105 Open-cut examiner’s responsibilities and duties—general (1) The site senior executive must ensure— (a) the main responsibility of an open-cut examiner for the mine is the safety and health of persons in or around the surface excavation during mining activities in or around the surface excavation; and (b) the open-cut examiner’s main duties relate to the main responsibility. (2) Subsection (1)(b) does not prevent the open-cut examiner having other duties at the mine, including, for example, duties given to the examiner under the mine’s safety and health management system. There are a number of additional key responsibilities under the QCMS&H Regulations Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner and further responsibilities that may apply from time to time throughout the Regulations.
Views: 58 Open Cut Examiner
Mines Act 1952 || section 22 || Hindi mining technical || miningtechnical
 
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Views: 2074 Mining Technical
COAL MINE REGULATION NO. 23.IN HINDI
 
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Thank you for watching my video plz like comment and share my video.
Views: 116 Mining India
Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 - Wikipedia Article Audio
 
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This is an audio version of a Wikipedia article created for the benefit of those who have vision problems or problem reading at night. This Wikipedia article audio was created under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike. To view the original article, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/[AUDIO_TITLE].
Views: 0 Wikipedia Audio
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 2531 Jo
Hearts of Coal: Dirty, Demanding & Dangerous (RT Documentary)
 
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It's dirty, demanding and highly dangerous, but in Russia, coal mining is a multi-billion dollar business. Join James Brown as he travels to the Kuzbass, Russia's coal basin, to see what it takes to work in an industry that employs more than 100,000 people, but which still claims lives every year. Meet the men who do one of the toughest rescue jobs in the world, the miners who spend their lives in some of the largest pits on the planet and the families that love them. Watch more on RT's documentary channel http://rtd.rt.com RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 500 million YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 14895 RT
Contributions of the American Miner
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Contributions of the American Miner DVD508 - 2004 *2004 Communicator Award Winner* Every day, materials merge from American surface and underground coal and metal/nonmetal mines. Mining provides minerals and fuels that enable our nation to work and produce items that we use every day. This video shows a wide variety of mining processes and the products that are produced from them. This is a great tribute to the hardworking men and women of our Nation's mines.
Views: 9690 PublicResourceOrg
Mines Act 1952||section 3|| hindi mining video ||mining technical
 
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माइन्स एक्ट का सेक्सन 3 || section 3 of mines Act 1952 || Act not to apply in certain cases || कुछ दशाओं में माइन्स एक्ट का लागु न होना || Hindi mining videos for mining competitive exams of CIL & SAIL SUBSCRIBE FOR FURTHER Updates जय हिन्द जय भारत
Views: 1025 Mining Technical
MMR 1961 regulation 32 Qualifications of DGMS inspector in Hindi
 
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MMR 1961 regulation 32 Qualifications of DGMS inspector in Hindi
Mine Safety Training Contests
 
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Mine Safety is serious business. Contests keep us sharp and ready for any situation we might have to face underground. The Mine Safety Unit is a part of the Workplace Regulations and Compliances division of the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Summer 2016
Access Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Kit | Global Training Institute
 
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Gain Instant Access to Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Tool Kit at http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/ Global Training Institute Phone: 1800 998 500 | Email: [email protected] | http://globaltraining.edu.au/ Site Senior Executive (SSE) Requirements QLD coal mining legislation requires that anyone wishing to sit the Mines Inspectorate’s SSE Legislation exam must have first completed the risk management competency RIIRIS601A as the pre-requisite, which is awarded on successful completion of this course. As of the 30th June 2011 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role in accordance with section 54(1) of the Act. In addition they must possess a qualification in risk management in either: RIIRIS601A or commonly known as ‘G3’ MINE7033 or GMIRM Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a prerequisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. Also as of the 30th June 2011 all persons appointed to a SSE role must either: Hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”); or On 31 March 2009 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role. From 30 November 2009 all persons appointed to a SSE role must hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”). Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a pre-requisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/
Regulation 29 !! CMR 1957 (Coal mines Regulation 1957)
 
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Rep. Johnson introduces the Coal Ash Landfill Safety Act (CALSA)
 
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Congressman Hank Johnson (GA-04) today introduced the Coal Ash Landfill Safety Act (CALSA) to protect citizens from dangerous coal ash that will be disposed in municipal landfills that are not equipped to handle the toxic substance.
Views: 141 RepHankJohnson
Mines Act 1952 Chapter 6 (Part-2/3)
 
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A descriptive video covering explanations of Mine's Act 1952. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 2006 ZEROTOINFINITYY

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