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The CHEMICAL BONDS Song  - NOW WITH CLOSED CAPTION SO YOU CAN SING ALONG!  Mr. Edmonds  -
 
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This song is about the formation of the two types of chemical bonds: IONIC BONDS and COVALENT BONDS. The tune is to "Dancing Queen" by Abba (the song from their album, Arrival). After looking for several song melodies, this one fit the words the best. Many thanks to my current and former science students for their encouragement! Document with words is in "Docs" section for dsecms on Teachertube, OR BELOW: The Chemical Bonds Song -- to the tune of "Dancing Queen" by Abba from the album Arrival. Words by Doug Edmonds. Oooh yeah, Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Watch you'll see! First we'll start with ionic bonds, A metal and nonmetal are involved. The metal gives over electrons, the nonmetal ... it receives. The atoms become IONS! Metals might have 1,2 or 3 Electrons for the nonmetal to receive It all depends on what's needed, to make the number 8 For the nonmetals' outer shell. AND IF IT HAPPENS FOR THEM ... They both become IONS ...... CHARGED ATOMS .... They become IONS! The metal's positive, the nonmetal's negative, They become IONS, oh yeah. The metal's plus, the nonmetal minus, and opposites they do attract. So what you get, when they come together, is an IONIC BOND. So what about those covalent bonds? It's not about loss and gain of electrons. Valence electrons they are shared, to complete the outer shells Of the nonmetals set to bond. IT'S WHEN NONMETALS JOIN ... to make covalent bonds With shared electrons ,,,, they're covalent bonds. Not a transfer, instead they share valence electrons, oh yeah! Ionic bonds ... covalent bonds ... both of them chemical bonds. How are they made? What's the dif-ference? Play the song again ! Ionic bonds, covalent bonds ..... both chemical bonds!
Views: 211430 dsecms
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1393879 It's AumSum Time
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2305136 Khan Academy
Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 44210 Socratica
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1734005 CrashCourse
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 255897 RicochetScience
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
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Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 135391 AtomicSchool
Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Carbon dioxide is a product of one of the most important chemical reactions in the world: combustion. Combustion is how a lot of people in the world heat their homes and power their cars. It also unfortunately contributes to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The carbon dioxide molecule is formed from one carbon atom and two oxygens. As an element, carbon only has 4 outer shell electrons and oxygen 6. Double covalent bonds form between the atoms, where two electrons from each atom are shared making 4 bonding electrons in total. The two groups of bonding electrons in carbon dioxide repel each other and this keeps the oxygen atoms as far away from each other as possible. Carbon dioxide is less reactive than water because it has two bonds with each oxygen. This means you need a lot more energy to break the atoms apart. Carbon dioxide's strong double bonds make it very stable and so whenever there are stray carbon and oxygen atoms flying about, they love to get together and form carbon dioxide. Like water, the bonds in carbon dioxide are POLAR COVALENT, making the carbon atom delta positive and the oxygens delta negative. Although, unlike water, carbon dioxide is not a polar molecule overall. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
It's a Chemical Bond - "Nothin' On You" Remix
 
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Another project for AP Chemistry. Cast and Credits John Haskell: First chorus, second singing verse, video producer Stephen Haskell: Second & third chorus, first singing verse, audio producer Eric Larsen: Both rapping verses, lyrics writer Lyrics [CHORUS] - John Ionic bonds, and covalent bonds, Forming and breaking, new molecules making, It's a chemical bond, babehhhhh, A chemical bond, baby, Electron pairs, are they transferred or shared? How do you name them, is polarity there? It's a chemical bond, baby, A chemical bond, baby. [RAP VERSE 1] - Eric Okay first off we'll start with ionic. They deal with ions, isn't that ironic, Cations, anions, polyatomic, Make a strong bond, like a bomb that's atomic, Typically a metal and a nonmetal bond, To get an octet so that they become strong, They get together and transfer electrons, They share them equally, neither one is conned. [SINGING VERSE 1] -Stephen What makes the bonds stronger? And last longer? And have a higher melting point you think? A correct inference, would be the difference, In electronegativity. To name it put the cation first you see, And on the anion put I D E Unless it's polyatomic then let it be Be...be...be... [CHORUS] -Stephen [RAP VERSE 2] -Eric Im'a talk about covalent bonds now Two nonmetals bond, you wanna know how? Atoms come together, cause they want an octet They share electrons to get eight in their set. Covalent differs from ionic greatly: They have a smaller difference in e-negativity, Percent ionic character is less obviously, What, about polarity? [SINGING VERSE 2] -John Non-polar, beats polar, When it comes to sharing equally. But polar, has a higher, Melting point than non-polar's be. Naming them is easy thankfully, Just put a prefix on the atom please, Rappin' bout bonds, yeah I'm a G. G...G...G [CHORUS] -- Stephen [BRIDGE] Now metallic bonds, are the bond type number three. Electrons aren't stagnant, they move around in a sea. It's senior year with Standish, and I'm lucky with a "C," Can't wait to get out of here, it's AP Chemistry. [CHORUS]
Views: 125346 Stephen Haskell
What is CHEMICAL BOND? What does CHEMICAL BOND mean? CHEMICAL BOND meaning & explanation
 
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What is CHEMICAL BOND? What does CHEMICAL BOND mean? CHEMICAL BOND meaning - CHEMICAL BOND definition - CHEMICAL BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A chemical bond is a lasting attraction between atoms that enables the formation of chemical compounds. The bond may result from the electrostatic force of attraction between atoms with opposite charges, or through the sharing of electrons as in the covalent bonds. The strength of chemical bonds varies considerably; there are "strong bonds" such as covalent or ionic bonds and "weak bonds" such as Dipole-dipole interaction, the London dispersion force and hydrogen bonding. Since opposite charges attract via a simple electromagnetic force, the negatively charged electrons that are orbiting the nucleus and the positively charged protons in the nucleus attract each other. An electron positioned between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, and the nuclei will be attracted toward electrons in this position. This attraction constitutes the chemical bond. Due to the matter wave nature of electrons and their smaller mass, they must occupy a much larger amount of volume compared with the nuclei, and this volume occupied by the electrons keeps the atomic nuclei relatively far apart, as compared with the size of the nuclei themselves. This phenomenon limits the distance between nuclei and atoms in a bond. In general, strong chemical bonding is associated with the sharing or transfer of electrons between the participating atoms. The atoms in molecules, crystals, metals and diatomic gases—indeed most of the physical environment around us—are held together by chemical bonds, which dictate the structure and the bulk properties of matter. All bonds can be explained by quantum theory, but, in practice, simplification rules allow chemists to predict the strength, directionality, and polarity of bonds. The octet rule and VSEPR theory are two examples. More sophisticated theories are valence bond theory which includes orbital hybridization and resonance, and the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital method which includes ligand field theory. Electrostatics are used to describe bond polarities and the effects they have on chemical substances.
Views: 3910 The Audiopedia
Balancing Chemical Equations Practice Problems
 
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Equation balancing will make sense! Here, we will do a bunch of practice problems for balancing chemical equations. We'll see the process or trial and error and the steps that you have to go through to balance chemical equations. You start by keeping track of the number of atoms on both sides of the equation, and then you add coefficients to one or more of the elements and compounds to make the number of atoms equal.
Views: 1997597 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Bonding | Ionic Bond |Bond Formation| Conditions and Examples | part 5 | Its Showtime
 
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In This Video We are Explaining about... Ionic bonding is a type of chemical bonding that involves the electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions, and is the primary interaction occurring in ionic compounds. It is one of the main bonds along with Covalent bond and Metallic bonding. Ions are atoms that have gained one or more electrons (known as anions, which are negatively charged) and atoms that have lost one or more electrons (known as cations, which are positively charged). This transfer of electrons is known as electrovalence in contrast to covalence. In the simplest case, the cation is a metal atom and the anion is a nonmetal atom, but these ions can be of a more complex nature, e.g. molecular ions like NH+ 4 or SO2−4. In simpler words, an ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metal to a non-metal in order to obtain a full valence shell for both atoms. Chemical Bonding | Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding |Sanjay Belli | Part 1 I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81PiY... Chemical Bonding | Lewis Dot Structure | Cause of Chemical Bonding | Part 2 I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93T9z... Chemical Bonding | Electronic Theory of Valency by lewis and kossel | Part 3 I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ud-37yjqVM&t=45s Chemical Bonding | Electronic Theory of Valency by lewis and kossel | Part 4 I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA8A9daNBKM&t=70s Please Subscribe, like ,share and comment Follow us on: Google+--- https://plus.google.com/u/0/111132752480302671330 Facebook--- https://www.facebook.com/Entertainmentalongwitheducation/ twitter -- https://twitter.com/Itsshow05041156 About Us: Its Showtime is a YouTube Channel, where you will find technological videos, Education Classes, Apps,Short-films etc, New Videos is Posted Everyday :)
Views: 311 Its Showtime
Chemical Bonding
 
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Chemical Bonding Though the periodic table has only 118 or so elements, there are obviously more substances in nature than 118 pure elements. This is because atoms can react with one another to form new substances called compounds (see our Chemical Reactions module). Formed when two or more atoms chemically bond together, the resulting compound is unique both chemically and physically from its parent atoms. Let's look at an example. The element sodium is a silver-colored metal that reacts so violently with water that flames are produced when sodium gets wet. The element chlorine is a greenish-colored gas that is so poisonous that it was used as a weapon in World War I. When chemically bonded together, these two dangerous substances form the compound sodium chloride, a compound so safe that we eat it every day - common table salt! In ionic bonding, electrons are completely transferred from one atom to another. In the process of either losing or gaining negatively charged electrons, the reacting atoms form ions. The oppositely charged ions are attracted to each other by electrostatic forces, which are the basis of the ionic bond. Notice that when sodium loses its one valence electron it gets smaller in size, while chlorine grows larger when it gains an additional valence electron. This is typical of the relative sizes of ions to atoms. Positive ions tend to be smaller than their parent atoms while negative ions tend to be larger than their parent. After the reaction takes place, the charged Na+ and Cl- ions are held together by electrostatic forces, thus forming an ionic bond. Ionic compounds share many features in common: •Ionic bonds form between metals and nonmetals. •In naming simple ionic compounds, the metal is always first, the nonmetal second (e.g., sodium chloride). •Ionic compounds dissolve easily in water and other polar solvents. •In solution, ionic compounds easily conduct electricity. •Ionic compounds tend to form crystalline solids with high melting temperatures. Checkout for more information: https://chemistry.tutorvista.com/physical-chemistry/chemical-bonding.html Follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tutorvista https://twitter.com/TutorVista
Views: 13362 TutorVista
Dual function Line for both Dipping and Hot roller (chemical bond and thermo bond)
 
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Dual function line which can make both chemical bond and thermo bond Dipping and Hot roller www.wjnonwoven.com
Views: 1426 max ju
Chemical Bonding part 4 Basics of Covalent Bonding
 
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In this tutorial, the basics of covalent bonding are introduced. Specifically the concept of a molecule is discussed along with an introduction to the diatomic molecules. Coordinate covalent bonding is also introduced in terms of drawing out hydronium and ammonium ions and identifying the difference between a covalent bond and a coordinate covalent bond. The importance of this differentiation will become apparent when acid base reactions are discussed in the future. A basic discussion of polyatomic ions, the presences of both covalent and coordinate covalent bonds and the formation of compounds that contain both ionic and covalent bonds is considered. Finally, molecules involving double and triple bonds are introduced and drawn examples are provided
Views: 34 Sarah English
What Is The Definition Of A Chemical Bond?
 
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This attraction 9 apr 2016 bonds definition, as used in chemistry, chemical engineering, and physics, along with examples of types a coordinate bond is covalent between two atoms where one the provides both electrons that form 19 2017 this definition term molecules exhibit bonding 17 jun 2002 every ionic made up at least cation anion. Chemistry definition of coordinate bond thoughtco. Any of several forces, especially the ionic bond, covalent and metallic by which atoms or ions are bound in a molecule crystal. See more describe various concepts developed for chemical bonds. It is caused atoms have their electrons distributed in layers or 'shells', from closer to the nucleus adding up outwards. Chemical bond wikipedia. Atoms tend to arrange themselves in the most stable patterns possible, which means that they have a tendency complete 30 jan 2014 how define chemical bond first place has long been point of contention, and some quirky new types are now forcing bonding chemistry topic by longman dictionary contemporary english what you need know about words, phrases set covers basics three ionic, covalent metallic. The bond may result from the electrostatic force of attraction between atoms with opposite charges, or through sharing electrons as in covalent bonds chemical bondany several forces, especially ionic bond, and metallic by which ions are bound a molecule crystal bonding any interactions that account for association into molecules, ions, crystals, other stable species make up definition, something binds, fastens, confines, holds together. Learn more a chemical bonding is an attraction between atoms or molecules and allows the formation of compounds, which contain two. Chemical bond definition of chemical by the free dictionarydefinition and examples define at dictionary meaning in cambridge english. What is the definition of a chemical bond? Quora. Chemical bond atoms stick together because of chemical attraction, meaning that various types are attracted to each other and come in a. What is chemical bond? does bond mean dictionary definition bonds. Bond formed when one or define covalent bond a chemical between atoms by the sharing of electrons Chemical definition free dictionarydefinition and examples at dictionary meaning in cambridge english. It also includes brief details ionic bond (definition). Each shell can contain a precise number of electrons 26 jul 2016. Expand the concept of what is meaning valence in this early stage? A number chemical bond meaning, definition, an electrical force that holds atoms together to form a molecule ( smallest unit. The polarity of a covalent bond is defined by any difference in janet rae dupree, pat dupree. What do you mean by chemical bonding? The bigger. Bonds definition and examples in chemistry thoughtco. Covalent bond definition and example (chemistry) thoughtco4 types of chemical bonds dummiesfeature from the chemistry topic quizletdefinition covalent by merriam webster. Chemical bond wikipedia a chemical is lasting attraction between atoms that enables the formation of compounds.
Views: 246 new sparky
Covalent Bond and Its Types- Explanation and Examples |Types of Chemical Bonds |
 
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The concept of Covalent bond and its types are explained in detail and in comprehensive style along with examples both of inorganic and organic compounds.... You can understand about chemical bonds and its types... This lecture is continuation of previous lecture on ionic bond... If u want to study ionic bond and its Formation the link is given below : https://youtu.be/ONyXn4y5gfE
Covalent Bonding (Part 3/3) -  Shapes of Molecules
 
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VESPR (Valence Shell Electron Repulsion) theory explains the shapes formed by covalent molecules. Both the bonding and non-bonding electron pairs determine the shape of the molecule; however, it is the configuration of the bonding atoms which determine a molecule's shape.
Views: 2274 VolkScience
Naming Ionic Compounds with Transition Metals Introduction
 
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We'll learn how to name ionic compounds that have transition metals in them. The names for transition metal compounds often have roman numerals in them, because the roman numerals indicate the charge on the transition metal. This is because transitional metal elements are able to make a variety of ions with different charge. In order to write the roman numeral for a transition metal compound, we need to work backwards, using the periodic table or a list of polyatomic ions to figure out what charge it has in that particular ionic compound.
Views: 1037629 Tyler DeWitt
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 713484 Tyler DeWitt
Online Chemistry Course: Chemical Bonding
 
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This online chemistry course video explains chemical bonding. Watch how two hydrogen atoms collide and stick together to make a molecule. See how they collide and chemically bond with oxygen to form water, with nitrogen to form ammonia, and with carbon to form methane. The chemical formula of these substances are explained, and the connection between the microscopic molecules that make up a substance and its macroscopic properties is shown. Also, the difference between an element and a compound is explained. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students. We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 30162 AtomicSchool
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1041114 Tyler DeWitt
Electrovalent bond from chemical bonding
 
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Both objective and subjective based questions.
Chemical Bonding:  Physical Properties of Molecular and Network Solids
 
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This tutorial provides a brief overview of the physical properties of both molecular substances and network solids.
Views: 9 Robert Collard
Types of chemical bonding
 
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Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade : 9 Subject :Chemistry Lesson : Chemical Bonding Topic: Types of Chemical Bonding Chemical bond formed between two atoms due to transfer of electron(s) from one atom to the other. atom is called "Ionic bond" or "electrovalent bond". A covalent bond involves the sharing of electrons between two atoms. The pair of shared electrons form A new orbit that extends around the nuclei of both atoms, producing a molecule A covalent bond is formed by two atoms sharing a pair of electrons. The atoms are held together because the electron pair is attracted by both of the nuclei. Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Views: 339 CBSE
Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals, Sigma and Pi Bonds, Sp Sp2 Sp3, Organic Chemistry, Bonding
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains the hybridization of atomic orbitals. It discusses how to determine the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule as well determining if a carbon is sp, sp2, or sp3 hybridized. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Valence Bond Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UP4LhDhoUE Molecular Orbital Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P21OjJ9lDcs Orbitals, Atomic Energy Levels, & Sublevels Explained! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sLXUr2HWIs How To Receive Tutoring and Get Paid At The Same Time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8A8JTpOWCQ Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Excel For Beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK-uNYuvcag Here is a list of topics: 1. Atomic Orbitals - S, px, py, and pz orbitals 2. Hybrid Orbitals vs Unhybridized Orbitals 3. Sp, Sp2, and SP3 hybridized Orbitals 4. S character vs P Character 5. Bond Strength of Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 6. Bond Length of Triple Bonds and Single Bonds 7. Sigma Bonds vs Pi Bonds 8. More Examples on Structure and Bonding 9. Electron Configuration of Carbon and Valence Bond Theory 10. Electron Configuration of Hybrid Orbitals - sp sp2 and sp3 11. dsp3 and d2sp3 hybridization 12. Hybridization of Lone pairs - Localized vs Delocalized Electrons 13. Hybridization of Lone pairs in resonance structures 14. Sigma and Pi Bonds In Single, Double, and Triple Bonds 15. Sigma Bonds and Overlap of Atomic Orbitals 16. Mixing Atomic Orbitals to form Hybrid Orbitals 17. Unhybridized P orbitals and pi bonding 18. Structure of Ethane With Hybrid Orbitals 19 Ethene or Ethylene Hybridization and Atomic Orbitals 20. Molecular Orbital Theory 21. Structure & Bonding of Ethyne or Acetylene - sigma and pi bonds 22. valence bond theory
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 622339 Bozeman Science
Chemical Bonds Lesson Two
 
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Description- Covalent Bonding
Electronegativity and bonding | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Electronegativity differences in bonding using Pauling scale. Using differences in electronegativity to classify bonds as covalent, polar covalent, or ionic. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Chemical Bonding part 5 Properties of Covalent Compounds and Net Solids
 
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This tutorial is a very quick overview of the properties of covalent compounds and a differentiation between molecular compounds and network solids. Examples are provided to put the concepts in context. Physical properties of both molecular compounds and network compounds are discussed.
Views: 21 Sarah English
Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds
 
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Chemical Bonding Covalent Bonds and Ionic Bonds. Mr. Causey discusses ionic bonds, covalent bonds and chemical bonding. You need to know the periodic table, valence electrons, lewis dot symbols, oxidation numbers and electronegativity in order to determine chemicals bonds. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com Subscribe for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl Basic Rules - 0:56 Valence Electrons - 1:10 Electronegativity - 1:18 Chemical Bonding - 1:46 Ionic Bond - 2:58 Covalent Bond - 4:00 Compound Characteristics - 6:26 Name that Bond - 7:50 Thinking Time - 8:57 Share this Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjoQHqgzda8 Resources: Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 Related Videos: Related Videos: Naming Ionic and Covalent Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XUsOLaz3zY Metallic Bonding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uNETGK_sb4 Molecular Geometry: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pq2wum1uDc Intermolecular Forces: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYZg1j7o2x4 Contact Me: [email protected] Follow Me: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544
Views: 284272 Mr. Causey
11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE |
 
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To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 01| Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding | https://youtu.be/daPAcFFSFdY 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE https://youtu.be/OqdNZTHxPxM 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE | https://youtu.be/ch9HorGagHE 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 04 || Fazan's RULE || Covalent Character in Ionic Compounds | https://youtu.be/d3iFlT8SlvA 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 05 || Lewis Dot Structure || How to draw Lewis Dot Structure Of || https://youtu.be/8-Qs1mnoJ2M 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 06 || Valence Bond Theory VBT || Difference between sigma and Pi Bond https://youtu.be/8B__xDUKqbM 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 07 | Pi Bond | P Pi - D Pi | P Pi - P Pi | IIT JEE NEET Pi Bond https://youtu.be/IrX7AcU07To Chemical Bonding 08 | Hybridisation | How to Find Hybridisation | Hybridisation of Atom IIT JEE NEET https://youtu.be/AvhUUY8yD08 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 09 | VSEPR theory | Shapes of Molecules | Geometry , Hybridisation ,etc https://youtu.be/x2-nP7i6T34 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 10 | Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part I Introduction | https://youtu.be/TQEhLXkNdmo Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 11 || Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part II || https://youtu.be/XCwMrnVvSTU Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule https://youtu.be/4KDkldXTj6w 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 13 || Bond Angle || Tricks For Bond Angle IIT JEE NEET || BOND ANGLE https://youtu.be/AjWwHkAlPSo 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 14 || Dragos Rule || Bond Angle Dragos Rule IIT JEE ADVANCE / NEET https://youtu.be/GfKmguqX-2g 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 15 || Vanderwaal Forces || IIT JEE NEET || London Forces , etc || https://youtu.be/664YicsoYkg 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET || https://youtu.be/k8tYXDKb2yE
Oxygen, Nitrogen & Carbon and Covalent Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry tutorial video explains how oxygen, nitrogen & carbon make covalent chemical bonds to school & science students . The video shows how the protons and electron shells, and especially the number of electrons in the outer shells determine how many bonds oxygen, nitrogen and carbon can make. Four important molecules, water H2O, ammonia NH3, and methane CH4 are discussed. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript:
Views: 143042 AtomicSchool
Chemical Bonds Song:  Ana and Amy
 
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Song: Can't stop the feeling by Justin Timberlake Lyrics: They're chemical bonds, they share and donate. Ionic, Covalent and Metallic they are called. Two non-metals share electrons, so that their outer shell is full and they stay calm. Cause I've got the Neon and the Argon, they are a covalent bond. And at the end of the process they have eight. Eight! If you want to show your process to your science teacher, you have to draw a Lewis Diagram. So don't stop! If you take Barium and Helium you will get an Ionic bond. And if you take Potassium and Sulfur, it's just Ionic. Just Ionic. Just Ionic. Chemical Bonds is when atoms bond together. The goal is for their valence shell to be full. Electronegativity defines the owner. Metallic is the only one that is missing. It's chemical bonds! So just learn, learn, learn, learn. It's chemical bonds! So just learn, learn, learn, learn. Ooh! Something chemical. If you take two metals then, they will bond. Let's put an example: Gold and Iron. They're both metallic and that's all we know. Cause I've got that Xenon and the Radon, they are a covalent bond. And at the end of the process, they have eight. Eight! If you want to show your process to your science teacher, you have to draw a Lewis Diagram. So don't stop! If you take Sodium and Silicon, you will get an Ionic Bond. And if you take Titanium and Boron, it's just Ionic. Just Ionic. Just Ionic. Chemical Bonds is when atoms bond together. The goal is for the valence shell to be full. Electronegativity defines the owner. Metallic is the only one that is missing. It's chemical bonds! So just learn, learn, learn, learn. It's chemical bonds! So just learn, learn, learn, learn.
Views: 138 Ana Sofia Cordero
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 39144 Socratica
Chemical Bonding | Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding |Sanjay Belli | Part 1 I by Its Showtime
 
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In This Video We are Explaining about .. Chemical bonds are the connections between atoms in a molecule. These bonds include both strong intramolecular interactions, such as covalent and ionic bonds. They are related to weaker intermolecular forces, such as dipole-dipole interactions, the London dispersion forces, and hydrogen bonding. The weaker forces will be discussed in a later concept. About : Its Showtime is a YouTube Channel, where you will find technological videos, Education Classes, Apps, Short-films etc, New Video is Posted Everyday :) Thanks For Watching Its Showtime itshowtime
Views: 1220 Its Showtime
Writing Ionic Formulas: Introduction
 
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Here's how to write formulas for binary ionic compounds. We'll see how you have to balance the charges of the two ions so they cancel each other out.
Views: 2185389 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Bonding For O & A Levels Chemistry
 
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Hi everyone, I am Hendra Wong, A & O Level Chemistry Tutor at Bright Culture. Yesterday I ate cheese and bacon. Why cheese and bacon? Because Cheese starts with “C”, and Bacon starts with “B”. “C” and “B” sound like Chemical Bonding. This past few weeks, the J1 one students have been starting Chemical Bonding in school. They complain to me “Wow, Hendra! Why are the notes so thick and scary? So different from Sec 3” But don’t worry. Sorry about the joke being a bit lame, now we continue. This very thick Chemical Bonding chapter, we can summarize in three different parts. Part one, the small stuff, like sigma and pi bond, those elements which can have more than 8 or less than 8 valence electrons dative bonding and dimer. Part two, those molecular shapes, when you start drawing the dot and cross diagram, after that, you identify the number of bond pairs and lone pairs of electrons and thus you know the molecular shape and the bond angle, right? That’s part two. Part three is about comparing and explaining the physical properties such as melting and boiling points, including those id-id,pd-pd and hydrogen bonding and so on. Part three: Comparison and explanation of physical properties of bonds. Today,for this short video, we do part three, about id-id, pd-pd and hydrogen (cut out chemical, it’s supposed to be hydrogen) bonding. Okay, it’s like this, if someone asked you, which has a higher melting and boiling point, NaCl, or HCl? How do we handle that question? Step 1: Identify whether these two substances belong to ionic compound, simple molecular, giant molecular structure, or ionic. Step 1: Identify which group the substances belong to. For these two, NaCl belongs to ionic, and then HCl belongs to simple molecular, right? Thus we conclude that NaCl has higher melting and boiling point. That’s point number 1. Point number 2, you need to know the full explanation, then look at your notes and memorize them. Example number 2: Someone asks you which one has a higher boiling point, HCl or N2? Guess. It’s the same step. Step 1: These two molecules both belong to simple molecular structure. So, we go to step 2. Step 2 will be,identify whether they belong to id-id,pd-pd or hydrogen bonding. HCl belongs to pd-pd. After that, N2 belongs to id-id. So, we conclude that HCl has the higher boiling point. Next, example number 3. Which one has higher boiling point, HF, or HCl? Same thing again, these two molecules both belong to simple molecular structure. So we go to step 2. HCl belongs to pd-pd, but HF belongs to hydrogen bonding. So, we conclude that HF has higher boiling point. So far so good. Next example is someone asking you, which has a higher boiling point, HF or ammonia? Same as before. Both belong to simple molecular, and both them are about hydrogen bonding. So, what to compare, if both are about hydrogen bonding? So, move on to Step 3.Which one is more electronegative, fluorine or nitrogen? Fluorine, right? Yes, thus we conclude that HF has a higher boiling point than ammonia. Next example, which one has a higher boiling point, water, H2O, or HF? This one is a bit tricky. Both of them are about hydrogen bonding, and fluorine is more electronegative than oxygen. However, by date, water has a higher boiling point. How come? This is because H2O forms more hydrogen bonds on average per molecule, so H2O has 2 hydrogen atoms and 2 lone pairs of electrons, compared to HF, which can only form one hydrogen bond on average. Why is it like that? To understand that, draw the dot-and-cross diagram for H2O and HF, then you will observe something. You will know that H2O molecules have two hydrogen atoms, and then two lone pairs of electrons. But then for HF, you have only one hydrogen atom, and three lone pairs of electrons. That’s why water has a higher boiling point. We still have more examples to compare melting and boiling points but it will be too long, so we’ll stop here for today first. Good luck. I am Hendra Wong,O & A Level Chemistry Tutor at Bright Culture. Visit www.bright-culture.com/a-level-chemistry-tuition for A Levels Chemistry Tuition in Singapore
Views: 69 Bright Culture
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
General Chemistry 1A. Lecture 08. Chemical Bonds.
 
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UCI Chem 1A General Chemistry (Winter 2013) Lec 08. General Chemistry -- Chemical Bonds View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_1a_general_chemistry.html Instructor: Amanda Brindley, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Chem 1A is the first quarter of General Chemistry and covers the following topics: atomic structure; general properties of the elements; covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding; intermolecular forces; mass relationships. General Chemistry (Chem 1A) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 23-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "General Chemistry" taught at UC Irvine by Amanda Brindley, Ph.D. Recorded March 14, 2013. Index of Topics: 0:01:57 Types of Bonds 0:04:30 Energy of Ionic Bond Formation 0:10:46 Lewis Dot Symbol 0:11:58 Ionic Bonds 0:14:50 Covalent Bonding: Molecular Compounds 0:16:04 General Lewis Structure Guidelines 0:19:11 Non-Octet Breaking Examples 0:32:48 Formal Charges 0:48:37 Breaking the Octet Rule Required attribution: Brindley, Amanda General Chemistry 1A (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_1a_general_chemistry.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US)
Views: 30603 UCI Open
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ketzbook Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 905282 ketzbook
Regents Chemistry Chemical Bonding Review Part 4
 
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This session reviews the concepts of metallic bonding, network solids, coordinate covalent bonds, polyatomic ions and how to identify compounds that have both ionic and covalent bonds
Views: 228 Sarah English
√ Effect of Light on Silver Salts | Chemical Earth | Chemistry
 
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#iitutor #Chemistry #ChemicalEarth https://www.iitutor.com The energy changes accompanying physical and chemical change have been discussed. In general terms it was suggested that chemical change is often accompanied by the absorption or release of greater quantities of energy than physical change because chemical change involves the breaking (and making) of chemical bonds. In chemical compounds, atoms of two or more elements are chemically combined.:The atoms are held together by chemical bonds, either covalent or ionic bonds. Chemical compounds are often classified into three general types-ionic compounds, covalent molecular compounds and covalent network compounds. The bond energies for covalent bonds vary in the approximate range 150-1100 kJ mol-1. Simple covalent molecular substances consist of molecules in which the atoms are held together by covalent bonds. The bond energy indicates the strength of the forces holding the atoms together in the molecule. Covalent network substances consist of a three-dimensional arrangement of atoms joined by covalent bonds. In sodium chloride the lattice consists of Na and Cl ions. The separation of the Na and Cl ions requires a large amount of energy, called the lattice energy, which is a measure of the strength of the ionic bond. For NaCl the energy required to separate the Na and Cl ions is 788 kJ mol , which indicates the considerable strength of ionic bonds. Similarly the quantity of energy needed to separate Mg and O ions in magnesium oxide is 3800 kJ mol . The range of ionic lattice energies is approximately 400 4000 kJ mol-1. Comparing the strength of the ionic bonds on ZnS and MgS. Both ZnS and MgS are ionic compounds. The energy required to decompose each compound to produce 1 kg of the metal is 3151 kJ and 14 280 kJ respectively. The much higher value for MgS indicates a much stronger ionic bond in this crystal than in ZnS. Comparing the strength of the covalent bonds H O and H S. Water and hydrogen sulfide are molecular compounds in which two hydrogen atoms are covalently bonded to an oxygen or sulfur atom respectively. The energy required to decompose 1 kg of water vapour and hydrogen sulfide gas into its gaseous atoms is 51 444 kJ and 21 412 kJ respectively. The higher value for water indicates that the O H bonds are much stronger than the S H bonds in hydrogen sulfide.
Views: 24 iitutor.com
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2400729 CrashCourse
3-12-1
 
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Which of the following is/are true? 1. A nonpolar molecule can have polar bonds. 2. A molecule with no polar bonds is nonpolar. A. 1 only, B. 2 only, C. both, D. neither
Views: 1411 Glenn Lo
Overview of Chemical Bonding
 
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When is it ionic bonding, covalent, or both kinds?
Views: 18 Aya Salah
CHEMICAL BONDING (HINDI & ENGLISH)
 
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A chemical bond is a lasting attraction between atoms, ions or molecules that enables the formation of chemical compounds. The bond may result from the electrostatic force of attraction between oppositely charged ions as in ionic bonds; or through the sharing of electrons as in covalent bonds. The strength of chemical bonds varies considerably; there are "strong bonds" or "primary bonds" such as covalent or ionic or metallic bonds, and "weak bonds" or "secondary bonds" such as dipole–dipole interactions, the London dispersion force and hydrogen bonding. Since opposite charges attract via a simple electromagnetic force, the negatively charged electrons that are orbiting the nucleus and the positively charged protons in the nucleus attract each other. An electron positioned between two nuclei will be attracted to both of them, and the nuclei will be attracted toward electrons in this position. This attraction constitutes the chemical bond. Due to the matter wave nature of electrons and their smaller mass, they must occupy a much larger amount of volume compared with the nuclei, and this volume occupied by the electrons keeps the atomic nuclei in a bond relatively far apart, as compared with the size of the nuclei themselves. In general, strong chemical bonding is associated with the sharing or transfer of electrons between the participating atoms. The atoms in molecules, crystals, metals and diatomic gases—indeed most of the physical environment around us—are held together by chemical bonds, which dictate the structure and the bulk properties of matter.
Views: 41 AT Science
Balancing Chemical Equations
 
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The art of balancing equations in chemistry! More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=RnGu3xO2h74 About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything.
Views: 2316976 Khan Academy
Back Bonding | Chemical Bonding | Inorganic Chemistry | JEE Mains, Advance, NEET & AIIMS
 
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Back bonding is a type of resonance. I can explain it through an example. See, in compounds like BF3, the boron atom has an incomplete octet. The fluorine atom on its side has a lone pair which it can donate to boron. But, flurorine is also a very electronegative element. So, it also has a tendency to take back the electrons that it had donated to boron. This way, the lone pair of electrons keep jumping between fluorine and boron. This is called back bonding. This provides the lone pair of electrons more number of exchange positions (which simply means more space). As a result, the molecule becomes more stable. However, back bonding is effective only when the size of the valence shell matches. In the case of BF3, both boron and fluorine have their valence electrons in 2p. But in BBr3, lone pair electrons are in 4p while valence electrons of Boron are in 2p. So, the size does not match. Also, electronegativity of the halogen decreases down the group. Hence, effectiveness of back bonding with Boron decreases down the halogen group.
Views: 2199 Chemistry Mentor
Representing Chemical Bonding (Lesson Two)
 
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Ionic and covalent bonding examples
Views: 151 HGTCChem