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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 565822 Khan Academy
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 255416 Khan Academy
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 9488 Arnold Tutoring
Bonds | Confused between the rates: Spot, Forward, Coupon, Current Yield, IRR, YTM, BEY
 
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CFA | FRM | SFM | Excel Live Classes | Videos Available Globally For Details: www.aswinibajaj.com WhatsApp: +91 9831149876 or https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=919830497377&text=Want%20to%20know%20more%20about%20classes & we shall get back to you. E-mail: [email protected] Hope you had a great learning experience! Do Like and Subscribe! And check our other videos on Finance (CFA, FRM, SFM), Resume making, Career options, etc. Click to access playlist. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyt8... Thank you.
Views: 18139 ASWINI BAJAJ
Bonds: Spot Rates from Forward Rates
 
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Learn the difference between a forward rate and a spot rate, and how to determine spot rates from forward rates by setting up equivalent expressions. Then you can use those spot rates to calculate the price of a coupon-paying bond.
Views: 11487 Arnold Tutoring
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 550360 Khan Academy
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 34927 EconplusDal
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 41398 Zions TV
Bonds - Coupon and Market Rates Differ
 
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Lesson discussing how the value of a bond changes when coupon rates and market rates differ. Looks at why a bond will trade at a premium, discount, or at par For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 4068 Harpett
8. Value a Bond and Calculate Yield to Maturity (YTM)
 
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Download Preston's 1 page checklist for finding great stock picks: http://buffettsbooks.com/checklist Preston Pysh is the #1 selling Amazon author of two books on Warren Buffett. The books can be found at the following location: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982967624/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0982967624&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=EOHYVY7DPUCW3WD4 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1939370159/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1939370159&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=XRE5CA2QJ3I2OWSW In this lesson, we began to understand the important terms that truly value a bond. Since most investors will never hold a bond throughout the entire term, understanding how to value the asset becomes very important. As we get into the second course of this website, a thorough understanding of these terms is needed. So, be sure to learn it now and not jump ahead. We learned that there are two ways to look at the value of a bond, simple interest and compound interest. As an intelligent investor, you'll really want to focus on understanding compound interest. The term that was really important to understand in this lesson was yield to maturity. This term was really important because it accounted for almost every variable we could consider when determining the true value (or intrinsic value) of the bond. Yield to Maturity estimates the total amount of money you will earn over the entire life of the bond, but it actually accounts for all coupons, interest-on-interest, and gains or losses you'll sustain from the difference between the price you pay and the par value.
Views: 386440 Preston Pysh
Bonds Market Rate vs Contract Rate
 
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Bonds Market Rate vs Contract Rate
Bonds Explained for Beginners | Bond Trading 101
 
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Earn up to 1 Year Free: https://bit.ly/2oul70h Free Resources: https://bit.ly/2wymZbJ A bond is a type of loan issued to some type of entity such as a business or government by an investor. It’s similar to borrowing money from a lender if you’ve ever purchased a home or car before. Sometimes businesses need more money than the banks will offer them, so they issue bonds as a way to raise more capital. Governments can also issue bonds when they need more money for things like roads or parks. Bonds are considered safer on the risk spectrum for investments, but they also typically carry a lower return. Benjamin Graham, author of the intelligent investor and Warren Buffets mentor, recommends holding a portfolio of 75% stocks and 25% bonds during a bull market and 75% bonds and 25% stocks during a bear market. As opposed to other investments which are considered equity, bonds are considered debt which means that if a company goes under, it must repay all bondholders before stockholders. This is due to the fixed interest nature of the bond. When the investor purchases a bond at what’s called the face value, they are paid interest, known as the coupon or yield. The reason it’s referred to as coupon is because back when bonds were actually paper, investors would physically have to clip coupons to redeem their interest. Anyway, the investor is paid a coupon on the bond until the loan is fully paid back by the issuer. This is known as the maturity date. Interest payment frequency and the maturity date is determined prior to the purchase of the bond. For example, if I purchase a $1,000, 3-year bond with a 5% coupon, I know I’ll receive $50 in interest each year for 3 years. Now it’s important to note that Bonds can vary in risk and return A AAA bond is the best bond you can buy while a Ba bond and lower are more speculative and are known as Junk bonds When it comes to bonds, the higher the return, the higher the risk. The lower the return, the lower the risk. Bonds with a longer maturity date are also riskier and carry a higher return. Typically government bonds will be safer than corporate bonds. When it comes to taxation, corporate bonds are taxed regularly while some bonds like municipal and other government bonds are tax-exempt. A bond can also be secured or unsecured With an unsecured bond, you may lose all of your investment if the company fails while with a secured bond, the company pledges specific assets to give shareholders if they fail to repay their bonds. Although bonds are considered a “safer” investment, they still do come with risks. When you purchase a bond, interest rates are out of your control and may fluctuate. Interest rates are controlled by the U.S. treasury, the federal reserve, and the banking industry. This means that if specified in your agreement, the company may be able to issue a call provision which is an early redemption of the bond. While not always the case, companies will take advantage of lower interest rates to pay back loans early. This leaves you with a lower return than what you expected. Bonds are also inversely proportional to interest rates so when interest rates go up, bonds go down and vice versa. Bonds can also be traded between investors prior to its maturity date. A bond that’s traded below the market value is said to be trading at a discount while a bond trading for more than it’s face value is trading at a premium. Bonds can be a great way to diversify your investment portfolio, however, they can also be quite complex. You can use investment platforms like Fidelity, E-Tade, or Charles Shwabb to learn more about specific types of bonds. For today’s video, we will be using Fidelity. Social Links: Website: http://www.wharmstrong.com Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DBEhdz Facebook: http://bit.ly/2F5uB8a Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wharmstrong1/ Disclaimer: Nothing published on my channel should be considered personal investment advice. Although I do discuss various types of investments and strategies, I am not a licensed professional. Please invest responsibly. This post contains affiliate links
Views: 6229 Will Armstrong
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 36696 TheFinCoach
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 377246 Khan Academy
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
Views: 36088 NEO IAS
What rising interest rates mean for municipal bonds
 
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John Miller, Nuveen head of municipals, discusses how municipal bonds have been performing in an environment of rising rates.
Views: 855 CNBC Television
Bonds Explicit and Implicit Tax Rates and Rate of Return
 
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This channel is for students or anyone who is experiencing difficulty with accounting and tax concepts. Hopefully my videos will help you grasp concepts that I found were challenging. I hand pick examples that I know are relevant to intermediate accounting and tax. If you have any suggestions for topics that I should cover please leave me a detailed message or comment addressing the topic and or question.
Views: 505 Accounting&TaxSOS
government bond explained | government schemes 2018 | What are bonds | latest bonds
 
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Hello friends in this video we will see latest bonds from government. The government has announced the launch of 7.75% Savings (Taxable) Bonds, 2018, which will open for subscription from January 10, 2018. The bonds will have a maturity of seven years. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 68814 Fin Baba
Bonds, Interest Rates, and the Impact of Inflation
 
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This educational video discusses the basics of bonds. People interested in investing should speak with their financial advisor. The video was produced by Mark Matos, a financial advisor in Naples FL. Blog: http://www.globalwealthconsultants.com/Blog.aspx Follow me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.matos Google+: https://plus.google.com/+MarkMatos1 Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markamatos Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkAMatos Music by Chris Zabriskie
Views: 5378 The Rebel Outpost
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
Bonds & Yields - part 3 (Hindi), Inflation vs Interest rates, बॉन्ड्स और यील्ड - 3
 
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This video explains the relationship between inflation and interest rates along with bond prices and rates. This video explains inflation and its effect on interest earned by investors. यह विडियो महंगाई दर और इंटरेस्ट रेट के बीच के सम्बन्ध को समझाता है, की किस प्रकार से महंगाई दर के बढ़ने और घटने का असर इंटरेस्ट रेट आदि पर पड़ता है.
Views: 10021 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Bonds Effective Interest Method - Discount
 
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This video explains how to calculate a bond that sells at a discount. It shows the corresponding journal entries on the original sale and interest payments. It also shows how to prepare the amortization table and explains what the numbers represent.
Views: 29411 mattfisher64
Face value, Coupon and Maturity of Bonds - SmarterWithMoney
 
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Investing in bonds can be tricky in today's market. Understanding the fundamental concepts associated with bonds is a good place to start.
Views: 26328 Religare
BONDS, BOND YIELD, INTEREST RATES,  INFLATION AND QUANTITATIVE EASING (HINDI)
 
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THIS IS THE VIDEO IN ECONOMIC DICTIONARY WHICH SHORTLY COVERS TOPICS LIKE BOND, BOND YIELD, INTEREST RATES, INFLATION, DEFLATION AND QUANTITATIVE EASING IN HINDI. DONATION LINKS PAYTM: 9179370707 BHIM: 9179370707
Views: 942 Ideal Coaching
How Will Higher Interest Rates Affect High Yield Bonds?
 
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May 28 -- Franklin Templeton Fixed Income Group Senior Vice President Eric Takaha discusses the bond markets. He speaks on “Market Makers.” -- Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 4336 Bloomberg
Bonds, the Bond Markets and Interest Rates
 
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This video is an introduction to bonds, the bond markets, and how the bond prices affect interest rates and GDP.
Views: 760 mcneilecon
Podcast #84- Bonds in a Rising Interest Rate Environment
 
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I was asked for some good strategies for investing in bonds in a rising interest rate environment. Show notes: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/bonds-rising-interest-rates-podcast-84/ These strategies include short term bonds, money market funds, inflation adjusted bonds, and stable value funds. Don’t extrapolate the past into the future. Interest rates may go up, down, or stay flat. Like you, I have no idea what the answer is. Neither does anybody else. Make sure you have an investing plan that is highly likely to reach your goals no matter what happens with interest rates in the short run and in the long run. I prefer a fixed asset allocation strategy. If you had a working crystal ball, stay in cash until rates are done going up, then switch to long term bonds until rates are done going down then switch again. You can hedge your bets by staying short, but there is a very real cost to doing that and we discuss that in this episode. For more thoughts on including bonds in your investment portfolio, try this post: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/thoughts-on-bonds-at-the-end-of-2014/ To learn more about how to allocate your assets and reach your financial goals, check out our Fire Your Financial Advisor course: https://whitecoatinvestor.teachable.com/p/fire-your-financial-advisor
Valuation 101: How Interest Rates Impact Bonds
 
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And how do fundamentals like inflation and interest rates factor into the investment value equation? In investing, as in so many other arenas, the questions with the most complex answers tend to start with one word — “why.” In this month's Motley Fool Answers mailbag comes a particularly good “why question" from a listener who’s curious about why we gauge the values of companies and assets with the metrics we do, and why different industries and businesses seem to be held to such different standards. To answer, special guest Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool, joins hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp. In this segment, he talks about the relative merits of different industries, and the inescapable relationships between inflation rates, interest rates, and risk and reward in investing. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 387 The Motley Fool
Treasury Bond Maven Robert Kessler Warns of Recession Ahead & Where to Take Shelter
 
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Yields on government bonds are falling across the globe. The yields on the benchmark 10-year bond in both Germany and Japan are negative for the first time in a couple of years. The European Central Bank, already announced it would hold its short-term rates below zero at least through December. Here in the U.S., where economic growth is stronger, the Fed reconfirmed that it is on hold. The futures markets, however, are betting on a change in policy toward more easing. The Federal-Funds futures were recently pricing in a 40% chance of one rate cut this year, an expectation several Fed officials were quick to dismiss. The bond market is signaling possible trouble ahead. For the first time since 2007 long-term interest rates, as measured by the yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell below short-term rates, as measured by the yield on 3-month Treasury bills. Known as an inverted yield curve it is considered to be a reliable indicator of recession. This week’s WEALTHTRACK exclusive guest has long been warning of subpar economic growth globally and the risks inherent in this recovery. He has spoken about them numerous times on WEALTHTRACK. Back by popular demand is Robert Kessler, Founder, and CEO of Kessler Investment Advisors, a manager of fixed-income portfolios with a specialty in U.S. Treasuries for institutions and high net worth individuals around the globe. Kessler is now telling clients that there is a recession dead ahead but his silver lining is that it provides an unusual investment opportunity. WEALTHTRACK #1541 broadcast March 29, 2019. More info: www.wealthtrack.com
Views: 44406 WealthTrack
Fixed Rate Bonds Explained
 
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Fixed rate bonds allow people to improve the returns on their savings by locking away their cash for a period of time. Find out more.
Views: 1568 Which4U.co.uk
Currencies and rates. Works just like bonds
 
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When rates go up bond prices go down and vice-versa. Same exact thing with currencies.
Views: 676 Michael Norman
This is how Professional Traders Trade Bonds - Interest Rate Futures trading interest rates
 
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Let me show the Correct Way to Trade Bond Futures Bond Futures LIVE Register HERE http://www.infinityfutures.com/webinarsRose83b.aspx Infinity Futures, Trading Bond Futures, how to trade the yield curve, using /ZN and /ZB Nobs Bubs Fits Fyts... interest rate futures, learn to trade CME Bond Futures bonds interest rates futures contract
Views: 2889 Jonathan Rose
How rising interest rates may impact bonds
 
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Pacer ETFs President Sean O’Hara discusses how rising interest rates are impacting bonds and where investors should allocate their capital.
Views: 1320 Fox Business
Short Term High Yield Bonds
 
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The current low interest rate environment means that bond investors have to take more risk in order to gain an attractive return on their invested money. The current low interest rates also present a risk that if interest rates and inflation rise in the future, then bond prices may fall and portfolios could suffer losses.
Views: 8304 hubbis
How to Amortize a Bond Discount
 
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This video explains how to account for bonds issued at a discount using the effective interest rate method for bond discount amortization. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 115945 Edspira
Who buys negative-yielding bonds? | FT Markets
 
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Read 'Why bond yields are so low' : http://on.ft.com/2e9kOE0 Negative yielding bonds are bonds which have a negative interest rate. It means that when a person buys those bonds, instead of generating profit, they lose money. Why would anyone buy such bonds then? Some institutions are forced legally, others are betting and hope to make money. ► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 5629 Financial Times
Theoretical price of a bond using spot rates (FRM T3-9)
 
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[my xls is here https://trtl.bz/2GyTeex] The theoretical bond price is the present value if the future cash flows are discounted at the spot (aka, zero rates); in other words, it is the price given by discounted cash flow (DCF). We don't expect the traded (observed) price to exactly match because the DCF price is fundamental, yet technical factors influence price too (e.g., supply/demand, liquidity). Discuss this video here in our FRM forum: https://trtl.bz/2JJIxKG.
Views: 1353 Bionic Turtle
8% GOI Savings Bond | Govt of India Bonds
 
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A fixed income product floated by the government that was ignored by investors for almost five years is back in demand. The 8% Government of India Savings (taxable) bonds, 2003 is a bond issued by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) commencing April 21, 2003. The bonds are available for purchase by individuals on tap i.e. you can buy them as and when required. As the name indicates, the rate of interest offered on the bond is 8% per annum. Interest is taxable in the hands of the investor. Since bonds are issued on behalf of the Government of India, it is the safest investment any investor can look for. However, interest on the bonds is taxable and it has a lock in of six years, which makes the bond less favourable over other investment options. Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
Bonds | YTM | INTEREST RATES | COUPON | YIELD | HINDI
 
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This video will help in understanding various topics like Bonds, Interest rates, YTM, Coupon Rate, Maturity, Yields, Relation of Interest rates with Bond Price
Views: 1128 GeekDonkey
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 1519 Brian Fricke
Should I Invest in Bonds When Interest Rates are Low?
 
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Since interest rates are at all-time lows, does that mean we should sell our bonds? Joe answers this viewer’s question in 60 seconds. Important Points 0:09 "We certainly believe in the asset allocations; we have approximately 40%-50% in bonds. With bonds doing so well over the past thirty years, I'm concerned with the direction of the bonds and [wondering] if perhaps we should put more into other equities" 0:32 "We're in a huge bond bull market because when interest rates go down, bond prices go up. So interest rates are basically at all-time lows" 0:47 "You have to look at bonds a little bit differently; you want to look at bonds to damper the overall volatility of the overall portfolio" 0:55 "Depending on what your time frames, your goals and everything else is, you don't want to look at bonds as an income stream potentially...you want to look at a total return portfolio" 1:09 "You absolutely want to make sure that you have some safety in your overall portfolio. 40% in bonds sounds reasonable; the other 60% in equities you want to make sure that it's globally diversified - when equities go up your bond prices are going to stay straight. When equities go down, your bonds are going to save you" 1:24 "You definitely want to keep bonds in your portfolio even in a low-interest environment" 1:37 "The key I would say is look at a total return, don't look at each individual asset class" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” Channels & show times: yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Excel Finance Class 54: Bonds & Interest Rate Risk
 
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Download Excel workbook http://people.highline.edu/mgirvin/ExcelIsFun.htm Learn Interest Rate Risk: 1. The Longer The Maturity, The More YTM Affects Bond Price 2. The Lower The Coupon Rate, The More YTM Affects Bond Price
Views: 12805 ExcelIsFun
06 Floating Rate Bonds
 
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Knowledge Varsity (www.KnowledgeVarsity.com) is sharing this video with the audience.
Views: 8019 KnowledgeVarsity
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation (2016)
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 3880 TheFinCoach
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
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Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 64167 Fidelity Investments
Trading the Forex with Bonds - Part 1
 
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Most investors have no idea how bond or note yields affect the forex or any other capital market. This is unfortunate because they play a major role in what happens to capital flows and can be used to time and manage forex trades. 100% free forex education available from http://www.pfxglobal.com.
Views: 11645 profitingwithforex
Be patient holding bonds as rates rise
 
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Although less volatile than stocks, bonds can have setbacks, especially when interest rates are rising. Steve Giles explains why and how investors can hold on. Steve Giles is vice president at Landaas & Company. http://www.landaas.com/about/talent/advisors/steven-giles Money Talk Video by Jason Scuglik http://www.landaas.com/about/support-staff/jason-scuglik Money Talk Video by Peter May http://www.landaas.com/about/talent/associates/peter-may More information and insight from Money Talk http://www.landaas.com/money-talk Money Talk Videos http://www.landaas.com/money-talk/money-talk-videos Landaas & Company Money Talk newsletter http://www.landaas.com/about/newsletter Follow Landaas & Company on Twitter http://www.Twitter.com/@_Money_Talk (initially posted April 13, 2018)
Views: 186 Money Talk