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Search results “Articles with abstracts”
GRAMMAR: How to use the definite article with abstract uncountable nouns
 
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We all want to be happy, but when do you just say ‘happiness’ and when is ‘the happiness’ the right thing to say. Find out with Catherine, Callum and Finn in this episode of 6 Minute Grammar. You can find more practice activities on our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/intermediate/unit-16/session-2
Views: 29274 BBC Learning English
Abstracts - evaluate articles
 
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Use Abstracts to quickly evaluate articles.
7th Science: Locating Articles for Abstracts
 
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Recorded with ScreenCastify (https://www.screencastify.com), the screen video recorder for Chrome
Views: 41 Jacqui Daves
Identifying Articles through Historical Abstracts
 
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Transcript: This short Library video will show you how to identify journal articles and other scholarly sources through the database Historical Abstracts, one of the key search tools for history researchers at University of Guelph. Historical Abstracts allows you to search listings of scholarly journal articles and other sources, including many in full-text. It covers world history from the year 1450 to present, but please note that the database does not include content on U.S. and Canadian history, which is available through another database called America: History and Life. Historical Abstracts can be accessed through the database list under the “Find” tab on the library website, www.lib.uoguelph.ca. You may also be able to access it through a link in the library subject or course guide associated with your research project. If you are Off-campus, you may be asked to log in through the Library website before proceeding to the database. This is the main search screen for Historical Abstracts. Enter combinations of your search terms at the top and apply any search limits (such as date of publication) at the bottom. It’s a good idea to brainstorm a working list of a variety of terms to combine in your searches. Start by entering your search terms. In this example, I've indicated that I want to find items that mention the words "Louis XIV" and "nobility." At the bottom of the same page, you can add any limits to your search in advance, like limit by date of publication, limit by peer-review status, limit by historical period, and more. If you don’t get the results you want, try adjusting your search terms and/or refining your search using the options in the column on the left of the page. Click on the title of the item you want to get further information and, if available, to access the full-text. Before accessing and reading the whole article, review details such as the abstract to determine if it’s going to be useful. An abstract is a short article summary. The official subject terms listed in the record are particularly useful. If you see one that’s relevant, click on it to see if there are other items classified in the same way. Links on the left-hand side of the page will indicate if the full-text is available in the database or elsewhere. If the article isn’t available in full-text in the database, click on the “Get it! Guelph” icon to check if it is available through another one of our resources. Don’t forget to try a variety of different searches using different combinations of terms to achieve different results. If you have any further questions, just ask us. For more details on how to access help, visit our website at www.lib.uoguelph.ca.
Views: 854 U of G Library
Grammar: Using THE with common and abstract nouns
 
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An abstract noun is a word that means a general concept or idea, like "life" or "friendship". We can use "the" with common nouns, as in "the sky is blue". But can we use "the" with abstract nouns? For example, would you say "happiness is important" or "the happiness is important"? If you are not sure, watch this lesson to learn when to use "the" with general and abstract nouns. Don't forget to take the quiz afterwards to test your understanding! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-the-common-abstract-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. Many English learners have trouble deciding when to use "the" or no "the", so I understand that problem, I know it can be a little bit confusing, but I believe that by the end of this lesson, you're going to find it much easier. Okay? So let's start with a little quiz first to see where you stand regarding that word "the". So, let's look at this first example. Should you say: "Life is beautiful." or "The life is beautiful."? Okay. Think about it. Decide. Another one: "Friendship is precious." or "The friendship is precious."? Which one is right? Think for yourself. We'll do one more, and then I'll give you the answers. "Happiness is important." or "The happiness is important."? Which one is correct? Do you know? How do you know? How do you decide which one is right? I'll tell you. When we're talking about something which is a general concept or idea, then we do not use "the". Okay? For example, let's take the first one. "Life is beautiful." Now, life is a general concept, so we do not need "the". So, this is the correct answer. All right? Not this. "Life is beautiful." Because life is a general idea, a general concept. Okay? We're not talking about anything specific. If we say: "The life of wise people is beautiful." that is something specific, and then we would be correct to say: "The life". Okay? But if we're just talking in general, then no "the". Let's look at the next example. "Friendship is precious." Again, friendship is a general idea or a general concept, so this is correct. Okay? In this example, this one was wrong. But if I said, for example: "The friendship between those two children is precious." then that would be fine, because now I'm specifying which friendship. Right? The friendship between those two children, so then it becomes specific, and then we would use "the". But in this example, this is correct. Okay? Just like this was, and this is wrong, because this is a general idea. Okay? Next one: "Happiness is important." By now you know, again, happiness is a general idea, a general concept, so this is correct. In this example, it would be wrong to say: "The happiness", because: The happiness of what? So, if we say: "The happiness of my family is important." that's fine. That's very good. That would be a perfect sentence. But in this case, we cannot say: "The happiness is important." because we didn't specify which happiness. Okay? So, in this case, that's wrong, and this is correct. Okay? Now, the same principle applies to these. See if you can figure it out. Okay? "I want to make money." or "I want to make the money."? Which one do you think is right? Are we speaking in general, or are we speaking specifically? Well, we are speaking in general right now, so this is correct, because we're just talking about money; we didn't say which money. I want to make money. Right? General idea. If I said, for example: "I want to make the money I need to pay my rent." that's specific, so then I could say: "the money", because I'm explaining after that which money. Okay? But in this example, no. Next one: "She wants to lose weight." or "She wants to lose the weight."? Is it general or is it specific? What do you think? It's still general. Good. By now you're getting really smart. "She wants to lose weight." is a general term. Right? We're just talking about weight in general; not any specific weight. But if I say: "She wants to lose the weight she put on during the holidays." that's specific, and then I need "the". Okay? But not in this example. So, last one here: "He needs to earn respect." or do we say: "He needs to earn the respect."? Is it general or is it specific? By now you know, you'll really know. It's general. Very good. Okay? Because we didn't talk about any specific respect; we're talking about respect in general. So: "He needs to earn respect." But if this was being used, it would be something like: "He needs to earn the respect of his peers." Peers are people your age. Okay? Or: "He needs to earn the respect of his employees." for example, or "of his parents". Then it becomes specific. Which respect? The respect of his parents, the respect of his employees. All right? So, if it was specific, then we could say "the", but when we're just talking in general, we don't need "the". "Life is beautiful.", "Friendship is precious.", "Happiness is important.", "I want to make money.", "She wants to lose weight.", "He needs to earn respect."
WRITING SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES (Part 14 of 18): Titles and Abstracts
 
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Whereas 20 years ago if we searched for an article in the library we would have access to the whole article (title, abstract, authors, introduction etc), now when we search online we will come across a large number of articles, choosing which to read based on the title then the abstract. Thus while the title and abstract were important before they are even more so now -- if the reader is not interested in your title they will not download your article. This video is from a Scientific Writing workshop given by Dr Eric Lichtfouse at the Postgraduate School at the University of the Free State (http://postgraduate.ufs.ac.za), South Africa, November 2013.
Finding Articles Using Sociological Abstracts
 
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This tutorial demonstrates how to access and download peer-reviewed articles using the Sociological Abstracts database.
Finding Articles Using Criminal Justice Abstracts
 
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This tutorial demonstrates how to access the database Criminal Justice Abstracts on the Wichita State University Libraries homepage, how to search for articles on that database and how to download them.
How to write an Abstract: Some useful tips
 
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First impressions are always important, and in the case of your research paper, it is the abstract that the reader gets to see first. Hence it is important to know how to write the perfect abstract. This video explains the purpose of an abstract, and provides some useful tips to help you write the most effective abstract for your paper.
Views: 138429 Editage Insights
Trouver des articles: la recherche par mots-clés dans Sociological Abstracts
 
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Cette capsule vidéo montre comment chercher des articles scientifiques sur un sujet à l’aide de mots-clés dans la base de données Sociological Abstracts (ProQuest).
Views: 284 Bibliothèques UdeM
Linguistics--Articles
 
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A Short lecture on Articles for TESL teachers
Views: 487 F Tuzi
PsycARTICLES Articles
 
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This is a 2.5 min. video on how to access articles from PsycARTICLES and limit results by publication date.
Views: 2421 BCOnlineLibrary
Finding scholarly articles in Historical Abstracts
 
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A video tutorial demonstrating how to find and verify peer-reviewed/scholarly journals articles in the database Historical Abstracts
Views: 222 jamescastrillo
How to Find Journal Articles
 
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A tutorial describing how to find journal articles using databases. Brought to you by Western Libraries. Please contact Research Help http://www.lib.uwo.ca/services/research.html for more assistance. Email [email protected] or Comment with questions or suggestions on more Videos & How-Tos See also "Get it @ Western not working" tutorial http://www.lib.uwo.ca/tutorials/getitatwesternnotworking See also "Putting Together your Search Terms" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk9O-856A4Q See also "Refining your Search with Fields" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaA3zTwzbEg See http://www.lib.uwo.ca/databases for these databases and many more: MLA International Bibliography Literature Online (LION) Art Full Text (some full text) Humanities International Complete (some full text) Humanities Abstracts British Humanities Index How to Find Journal Articles by Western Libraries is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_GB
Views: 6427 Western University
Doctoral Studies Faculty Dr. Dani Babb on Abstracts and Full Text Articles in Research
 
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CityU Division of Doctoral Studies Faculty Dr. Dani Babb discusses how to identify whether a learner can use an abstract for research or should download the full text of an article.
Views: 35 Leadership Matters
Exploring Video Abstracts in Science Journals: An Overview and Case Study
 
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Video abstract for the article: Spicer, S. (2014). Exploring Video Abstracts in Science Journals: An Overview and Case Study. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(2):eP1110. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1110 Read the full article in JLSC at http://jlsc-pub.org/jlsc/vol2/iss2/2/ TEXT ABSTRACT (note: not a video transcript) INTRODUCTION The video abstract has emerged in recent years as a new way of communicating the results of scholarly enquiry. For library-based journal publishers who want to support multimodal scholarship, it is useful to understand the potential benefit and impact of incorporating video abstracts into their publications. This paper provides an overview of the growth of video abstracts in science scholarship, and presents a single journal case study that compares the use and potential impact of video abstracts hosted on both YouTube and on a journal's own website. METHODS For the case study, video abstract usage data for the New Journal of Physics (NJP) was gathered from both YouTube and the NJP native platform and then correlated using a Spearman rank correlation coefficient test to analyze viewing usage. Viewership data from both platforms was also correlated with article usage counts using Spearman to study the relationship between article usage and corresponding video abstract usage. RESULTS Users predominantly accessed the journal's hosted video abstracts instead of the abstracts posted on YouTube. However, there was a moderate positive correlation comparing view counts of the same video abstracts across both platforms, suggesting proportionate use of both platforms. In addition, the top 25 and 100 read articles had a significantly higher presence of video abstracts than articles overall in the data set, although a specific reason for that relationship cannot be identified. DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION Video abstracts are a natural evolution of science communication into multimodal environments. Publishing trends will likely continue to grow gradually, with appreciation for non-traditional scholarship (multimodal scholarship) and new measures for assessing impact (altmetrics) potentially encouraging greater adoption. Library-based journal publishers should consider investing in software that offers dynamic media integration, offering the video abstract option to their authors, and leveraging YouTube to further raise the visibility of their authors' research articles and publication. Library-based publishers should have some expectation that the video abstracts will be viewed relatively proportionally across platforms (i.e. a video abstract that receives a higher or lower view count on the journal's website is moderately more likely to also receive a higher or lower view count on YouTube), with the majority of total views (for all videos) coming from the journal's website. Subject and media librarians should become more aware of these emerging practices to support the video abstract publication and creation needs of their research communities. Note: CC-BY license does not apply to University of Minnesota logo/wordmark.
Views: 2377 JLSCMedia
WSU Libraries Tutorial - Sociological Abstracts
 
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A brief tutorial on how to use Sociological Abstracts database through the Wichita State University Libraries. You will learn how to find Sociological Abstracts on the Wichita State University website and how to download and save articles for use in your research. Please note that only Wichita State University Faculty and Students are able to access the Sociological Abstracts database through the libraries website.
Views: 2032 WSUTV
How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)
 
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How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention! TIMESTAMPS Find out the requirements 0:55 Pick the right abstract type 1:42 Consider your readers 3:27 Explain the importance of your research 4:10 Explain the problem and your methods 4:45 Avoid copy-pasting 5:19 Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15 Include key phrases and words 7:00 Sum it up 7:49 Editing and proofreading 8:18 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style. -When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces. -Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts. -As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers. -It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract. -Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences. -No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion. -If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help. -An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument. -Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 93209 BRIGHT SIDE
Scanning Results and Reading Abstracts
 
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This video focuses on discussing how to learn from your search results and use abstracts to decide if something is relevant.
Views: 263 USU Libraries
Structured Abstract for Original Articles, Brief Reports, Systematic Reviews [HD]
 
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This video explains in details: 1. How to write structured abstracts for Original Articles, Brief Reports, Systematic Reviews, and Meta-Analyses? 2. Tips on how to write abstracts. The Annals of Saudi Medicine (ASM) is published bimonthly by King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We publish scientific reports of clinical interest in English. All submissions are subject to peer review by the editorial board and by reviewers in appropriate specialties. The journal will consider for publication manuscripts from any part of the world, but particularly reports that would be of interest to readers in the Middle East or other parts of Asia and Africa. For more information about the journal, please visit: Annals of Saudi Medicine official website: http://www.annsaudimed.net/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/annsaudimed Facebook: https://goo.gl/mqnfpX LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/Qc89iQ Interested in submitting your manuscript to the Annals of Saudi Medicine, please visit: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/asm
Your Paper is Dead! Bringing Life to Research Articles with Animated Figures
 
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Project Information page: http://www.autodeskresearch.com/publications/animatedfigures The dissemination of scientific knowledge has evolved over the centuries from handwritten manuscripts transcribed and published as physical black and white prints-on-paper, to digital documents in full color available for consultation online. Even if it now primarily relies on digital media, academic publishing still generally adheres to its historical rigid paper-based style—where static content is presented at the ready-to-print letter format. In this paper, we reflect on our experience of authoring a published academic article that embeds an animated figure and discuss the opportunities and caveats of transitioning to such practice at the wider academic literature scale. ___________________ This is the video preview for the alt.chi 2015 Article: Tovi Grossman, Fanny Chevalier & Rubaiat Habib. (2015). Your Paper is Dead! Bringing Life to Research Articles with Animated Figures CHI 2015 Extended Abstracts (alt.chi): ACM Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Autodesk Research http://www.autodeskresearch.com
Views: 1182 Autodesk Research
The Shortest Ever Papers - Numberphile
 
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Audible 30-day free trial: http://www.audible.com/numberphile (sponsor) Tony Padilla discusses some of the shortest math papers to be published. From Conway to Nash. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile NUMBERPHILE Website: http://www.numberphile.com/ Numberphile on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/numberphile Numberphile tweets: https://twitter.com/numberphile Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Numberphile_Sub Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): http://bit.ly/MSRINumberphile Videos by Brady Haran Brady's videos subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/BradyHaran/ Brady's latest videos across all channels: http://www.bradyharanblog.com/ Sign up for (occasional) emails: http://eepurl.com/YdjL9 Numberphile T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/numberphile Other merchandise: https://store.dftba.com/collections/numberphile
Views: 1242230 Numberphile
PsycARTICLES: Abstracts & Methodologies
 
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This is a 3 min. video on how to find and use article abstracts and methodology searches in PsycARTICLES.
Views: 643 BCOnlineLibrary
Reading a MEDLINE Abstract
 
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The MEDLINE database is useful for finding original research reports that have been published in the biomedical journals. Original research reports are considered primary sources of information. Most of the articles indexed in MEDLINE will provide and abstract. Abstracts are useful because they summarize the content of an article. You will need to read the abstract to determine if you’ve found a primary or secondary source of information. Start by searching for articles in MEDLINE. In this example, we are pairing our concepts together with a Boolean “AND”. Scroll through your results and click on a title to view the article’s abstract. Start by looking at the “Publication Type”, this is our first indication that the article is a review article. Now scroll down to the abstract. Notice that there is no mention of study design, methods, or sample size. If we choose to, we can view the full text of this article in PubMed Central by bringing up the PDF. Notice that “Review” is printed on the document. Clearly, this is a review article. Review articles are summaries of another’s original research and are not considered primary sources of information. Back to our MEDLINE results to select another title. Scroll down to the abstract. Notice that it includes information about the study design, methods, and sample size. This is a research study and, as such, it is considered a primary source of information.
Views: 47 ACLibrarySON
All about abstracts
 
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Calling all students, researchers, and scholars! Do you have large research papers or articles you wish to present at a conference or publish in a journal? If the answer is yes, then you will need to know how to write an abstract. An abstract is a short (approximately 250 word) summary of a research paper or project that is necessary for submitting a paper for publication in an academic journal or application for a conference presentation. Summarizing the contents of a large work can be tricky! So come learn how to write a successful paper abstract and improve your English language skills! Our speaker is Benjamin E. Cohen who is currently on Fulbright Program in Ukraine. We will talk about abstract format, tips for writing short summaries, and practice writing our own abstracts.
Vlog 43   Journal titles, keywords and abstracts
 
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Tara talks about three under-discussed parts of journal article writing: title selection, keywords and abstracts. Tara provides quick and easy tips to select the type of title to use, creating effective keywords and how to carefully craft an abstract. Some very easy techniques can create increased momentum and readability for research.
Locating scholarly sociology articles
 
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Using EBSCO Academic Search Premier to locate scholarly sociology journals
Views: 93 nscclibrary
Sociological Abstracts-- Basic Search
 
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An introduction to searching Soc Abs for peer reviewed articles.
Views: 819 liblituwm
Creating Video Abstracts
 
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CREATING VIDEO ABSTRACTS: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting creating video abstracts. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Creating Video Abstracts can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3iA1YiXflCyOMbkFiphrfBp JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about video abstracts. Video abstracts are short videos that discuss a scholarly paper or research article. The video is usually less than five minutes and would accompany or link to the full text of the article or paper. A video abstract can help to communicate information about the study or the paper, methods used, the results or findings, and other salient points. Some studies have found that articles with video abstracts increase downloads or views anywhere from 25% up to 1000%. Video abstracts are normally created by the authors of the paper. Many times, they are produced in a low tech, low cost fashion. Some authors may be fortunate enough to have colleagues or institutional help to make the videos more professional or more high tech. The formats can range from whiteboard drawings, to screen-recordings, to slide-shows, to animation, to going on location, but many times, simply the author reading the abstract. A video’s audience could be those in the field of study for the journal, or it may seek a broader appeal. Some abstracts can rack up staggering viewership statistics. Publishers have taken notice and are increasingly interested in adding this option to key papers or sometimes all articles. A wide range of publishers from Taylor and Francis to Cell Press to Wiley to IOP Science routinely solicit and accept video abstracts. And the list is growing longer. Check out the platform WeShareScience which provides a place to publish and share video abstracts. Abstracts on the site are searchable and organized by subject area. It also has an advanced search feature that allows the viewer to search the transcripts of the videos. Video abstracts allow readers and viewers to connect with the authors and understand their area of research, to dive into what a paper is about and why it is important, and where the research is going. Think about including them in your publishing operation. If you are an author, get creative and put your best face forward. Video abstracts can become a whole new skill to develop, potentially including storyboarding, video editing, and more. There are lots of videos on how do all these things. But first start small. Ensure good lighting and a good background, as well as good sound. You can grow from there. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist on creating a video abstract. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 107 John Bond
Sociological Abstracts
 
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A short introduction to using Sociological Abstracts to find journal articles
Views: 642 UTMLibrary
How to find sources through Historical Abstracts
 
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Transcript: How to find sources through Historical Abstracts Historical Abstracts is a database that allows you to search listings of scholarly journal articles, books, and other sources, including many in full-text. It covers world history from the year 1450 to present. Please note, however, that this database does not cover subjects related to North America. If you are looking for sources on U.S. and Canadian history, check out the database America: History and Life instead. At the main search page for Historical Abstracts, enter combinations of your search terms at the top. In this example, I've indicated that I want to find sources that mention the words "Louis XIV" and "nobility." At the bottom of the same page, you can add limits to your search in advance, like specifying the historical period you're studying or the language of publication. Click "Search," then review the list of results that come up. If your search has produced too many results, try adding further limits using the options to refine your results in the column on the left side of the page. If your search hasn't brought up the results you were hoping for, try changing the search terms you're using. This can produce results that you might not otherwise come across. Once you've found a source that seems promising, click on its title to get further information and, if available, to access the full text. Before accessing and reading the whole source, review details such as the abstract to determine if it's going to be useful. An abstract is a short description. The official subject terms listed in the record are particularly useful. If you see one that's relevant, click on it to see if there are other sources classified in the same way. Links on the left side of the page will indicate if the full text of the source is available in the database. If the source isn't available in full text in the database itself, click on the "Get it! Guelph" icon to check if full text is available through another one of our databases. Don't forget to try a variety of different searches using different combinations of terms to achieve different results. And if you have any further questions, just ask us.
Views: 472 U of G Library
Searching Sociological Abstracts Database
 
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Finding Scholarly Articles using Sociological Abstracts Database
Views: 647 Allie E. Carr
43. Ian Wilson in "Dreamscapes" | Lucid Dreams, Precognition, Qualia & Interconnectedness
 
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We’re slashing through your subconscious like a nightmare on Elm Street with this supernatural sonic paralysis, and we’re diggin’ deep into the dreamscape in this one with Ian Wilson. Ian is a private dream researcher and dream explorer who has been recognized by members of the International Association for the Study of Dreams as a pioneer in the exploration of precognitive dream phenomena. Ian is also the man behind the website YouAreDreaming.org, which is a wet dream for anyone interested in dream research, consciousness or anything associated with these fields. Ian has tons of free articles, abstracts and ebooks available on his website, including a book titled “You Are Dreaming”, which I stumbled across a few years back and recommend to anyone with even a passing interest in this topic. We’ll be digging into the material in that book and much more. So why wait? Let’s curl up, close our eyes and cast this pod off into a space where the kick is something you get while you’re sleeping and where dreams really do come true. Enjoy. RESOURCES Ian’s website: http://youaredreaming.org Ian on Twitter: https://twitter.com/YouAreDreaming Ian on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfsKtwl6YW9-eMKwM7uP9DQ “You Are Dreaming” by Ian Wilson (free ebook): http://youaredreaming.org/articles/dreaming-free-e-book-ian-a-wilson/ “Theory of Precognitive Dreams” by Ian Wilson (free abstract): http://youaredreaming.org/2013/08/14/the-theory-of-precognitive-dreams/ “Déjà Rêvé?” by Ian Wilson (free abstract): http://www.youaredreaming.org/assets/pdf/deja_reve.pdf Power-Trips: Controlling Your Dreams: http://youaredreaming.org/references/power-trips-controlling-your-dreams/ Tom Campbell’s My Big Toe: http://www.my-big-toe.com/ Anthony Peake: https://www.anthonypeake.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/Dreams/ https://www.reddit.com/r/LucidDreaming/ SUPPORT: https://www.occulturepodcast.com/support Podcasting costs money. Website maintenance, storage space, equipment, late night organic juice runs when we're up all night editing. Help us offset some of that cost by supporting the show monthly. This will also help us increase our storage space so we can provide longer episodes and more of them. Leave your name in a note and you and your support level will be recognized on air. We have seven levels of monthly support: Initiate - $1.11 Astrologer - $3.33 Magician - $5.55 Alchemist - $7.77 Adept - $9.99 Shaman - $11.11 Ascended Master - $13.13 Don't want to support the show monthly? No sweat. You can make a one-time donation in an amount of your choosing. MUSIC Vestron Vulture - “I Want to be a Robot (Tribute to Giorgio Moroder)” https://soundcloud.com/thevulturex/2-i-want-to-be-a-robot-tribute DISCLAIMER This podcast is produced in the Kingdom of Ohio and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode REMINDER LOVE yourself // THINK for yourself // QUESTION authority
Views: 1350 Occulture Podcast
Texas A&M University Beef Cattle Research
 
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Cliff Lamb is currently the Department Head of Animal Science at Texas A&M University. His primary Extension and research efforts have focused on applied reproductive physiology in cattle emphasizing synchronization of estrus in replacement heifers and ostpartum cows. In addition, in 2013, Dr. Lamb and 6 colleagues eceived the USDANIFA Partnership Award for Multi state Efforts for their Extension efforts in reproductive management and received the University of Florida Research Foundation Fellowship Award in 2014 and the ASAS Animal Management Award in 2015. His rograms have received more than $10 million in grant funds or gifts. He has published 101 refereed journal articles, along with more than 510 extension and research reports. Andy Herring has been teaching college courses and conducting research related to beef cattle production as a university faculty member since 1994. He has a passion for teaching as well as production-oriented research, and has received several awards for oth. Dr. Herring is also passionate about educating and working with livestock producers so that they can make the most-informed decisions regarding profitability and sustainability. His research rogram has been heavily focused on improved efficiency of beef production systems involving Bos indicus-Bos taurus crossbred cattle, and he has published over 200 publications including journal articles, scientific abstracts and conference papers. Will Kayser is a PhD student in the Animal Science Department at Texas A&M University, where his research is focused on developing methodologies to identify deviations in cattle behavior for the purpose of disease detection. Prior to his arrival at Texas A&M he was involved in commercial research and feedyard operations in the Pacific Northwest for a large livestock producer during which he achieved an MS from the University of Idaho.
Views: 691 BBUcattle
14 - 2009 Emergency Medicine & Acute Care Series - Articles That May Change Your Practice Part 2
 
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Presenters: Kevin Klauer, D.O. W. Richard Bukata, M.D. Peter Viccellio, M.D. Neal Little, M.D. Using primarily the Emergency Medical Abstracts database of nearly 15,000 abstracts, and focusing on the literature primarily of the last five years, 36 presentations, each of 30-minute duration, are presented along with four 90-minute faculty panels. The topics chosen to be addressed are determined by faculty input and feedback from prior registrants. Using largely a question/answer format, the focus of the course is the new, the controversial and the provocative. The course faculty synthesize the literature and combine it with their clinical experience to provide participants with specific recommendations regarding diagnosis and therapy related to emergency care.
Amazing Anemonies: Pause Video to Read Slides (if Needed)
 
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presentation by Tansy Schreiber 29 October 2018 Tansy used many sources for this presentation, some of which were: www.Wikipedia.com (many, many articles) www.Actiniaria.com (many, many pages) www.marinespecies.org - WoRMS : World Register of Marine Species (many, many pages) And many, many, MANY (should have kept track but didn't and now we know for next time) links from these various sources, including some primary research from over 100 years ago available on Google books, and various journal articles and abstracts (too many even to remember). This is why it is very important to keep your bibliography AS YOU RESEARCH and not try to piece it together afterwards, as Tansy learned. Ha!
Views: 10 Morro Schreiber
Our Place in the Cosmos
 
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Google Tech Talk (more info below) December 1, 2011 Presented by Raja (Puragra) GuhaThakurta. ABSTRACT The lecture "Our Place in the Cosmos" explains how we (and, for that matter, all complex life forms) are connected to the Universe around us. This connection relies on the fact that our Milky Way and other galaxies like it play host to cosmic recycling processes that involve the formation of stars and their planetary systems inside nebulae (dense gas/dust clouds), nuclear fusion reactions that occur within stars, and the death of massive stars in explosions known as supernovae. As a result of these processes the Earth contains elements like carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, all of which are essential ingredients of protein molecules that are basic building blocks of life on Earth. To understand our origin we must therefore understand how galaxies form as part of the so-called cosmic web and evolve via galaxy cannibalism: merging and destruction of small satellite galaxies whereby their stars are incorporated into larger galaxies. This portion of the story will take us back to the earliest imaginable times in the history of the Universe. The talk will be illustrated with the latest astronomical images obtained using space-/ground-based telescopes and state-of-the-art computer simulations. Speaker Info: Raja (Puragra) GuhaThakurta received a bachelor's degree in Physics at Saint Xavier's College in Kolkata, India and a Ph.D. in Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University in 1989. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ and at Princeton University. He worked briefly at NASA's Space Telescope Science Institute in Balitmore, MD (operational headquarters of the Hubble Space Telescope), before joining the faculty of the University of California Santa Cruz in 1994 where he is currently a professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics. The primary focus of GuhaThakurta's research is the formation and evolution of galaxies, including the Andromeda galaxy. He has authored/coauthored ~350 journal articles and meeting abstracts, and has given dozens of lectures, both non-technical and technical. He received an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in 1997 and the Herzberg Memorial Prize and Fellowship in 2001. This talk was hosted by Jeff Dean and Boris Debic.
Views: 75206 GoogleTechTalks
Locating Abstracts in Academic Search Premier
 
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How to locate abstracts of sociology articles in Academic Search Premier
Views: 16 nscclibrary
Identifying Articles through America History & Life
 
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ Transcript: This short Library video will show you how to identify journal articles and other scholarly sources through the database America: History and Life, one of the key search tools for history researchers at University of Guelph. America: History and Life allows you to search listings of scholarly journal articles and other sources, including many in full-text. It covers North American history from prehistory to present, and please note that this includes Canadian history, in spite of the database's title. America: History and Life can be accessed through the database list under the “Find” tab on the library website, www.lib.uoguelph.ca You may also be able to access it through a link in the library subject or course guide associated with your course or research topic. If you are off-campus, you may be asked to log in through the Library website before proceeding to the database. This is the main search screen for America: History and Life. Enter combinations of your search terms at the top and apply any search limits (such as date of publication) at the bottom. It’s a good idea to brainstorm a working list of a variety of terms to combine in your searches. Start by entering some of these terms. In this example, I've indicated that I want to find items that mention the words "telegraph" and "military." At the bottom of the same page, you can add any limits to your search in advance, like limit by peer-review status, limit by historical period, limit by date of publication, and more. If you don’t get the results you want, try adjusting your search terms and/or refining your search using the options in the column on the left of the page. Click on the title of the item you want to get further information and, if available, to access the full-text. Before accessing and reading the whole article, review details such as the abstract to determine if it’s going to be useful. An abstract is a short article summary. The official subject headings listed in the record are particularly useful. If you see one that’s relevant, click on it to see if there are other items classified in the same way. Links on the left-hand side of the page will indicate if the full-text is available in the database or elsewhere. If the article isn’t available in full-text in the database, click on the “Get it! Guelph” icon to check if it is available through another one of our resources. Don’t forget to try a variety of different searches using different combinations of terms to achieve different results. If you have any further questions, just ask us. For more details on how to access help, visit our website at www.lib.uoguelph.ca
Views: 592 U of G Library
Research Methods: Finding Articles in Taylor and Francis Online
 
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How to find academic articles for literature reviews and annotated bibliographies using the Taylor & Francis database. Although specifically recorded for my undergraduate research methods course, feel free to use this information for any of your own coursework. These are tips and tricks I've learned in doing research along the way. Hopefully it will be of some help to you.
Views: 872 Dr. Chris Copeland
Emergency Medical Abstracts August 2012
 
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Emergency Medical Abstracts is a monthly audio publication that, since 1977, has been providing its 5000+ subscribers with searchable abstracts and authoritative audio commentary based on key articles selected from the 600+ journals surveyed monthly. In addition, the publication is available in internet, CD and printed versions and is accompanied by a four-page essay, a bonus 30-minute lecture and a CME component. As we enter our 34th year of publication we are providing a number of substantial enhancements and new features to make the program even more worthwhile.
WRITING SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES (Part 16 of 18): The article of the future
 
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The article of the future is different from the old-style article; it is formatted to be read online, e.g. with a menu with different sections for the abstract, introduction, results, images etc. Keywords which summarise the abstract are used. On the front page of the online article, the main figure should take up a significant proportion of space, e.g. 50%. Social networks can also be used as a way of sharing articles so that they are viewed. This video is from a Scientific Writing workshop given by Dr Eric Lichtfouse at the Postgraduate School at the University of the Free State (http://postgraduate.ufs.ac.za), South Africa, November 2013.
How Scientists Manipulate Research With P-Value
 
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Numbers don’t lie, right? Or are scientists intentionally using statistics to mislead us? Top 5 Things Wrong With Science ►►►►http://bit.ly/1pILTAB Sign Up For The TestTube Newsletter Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1myXbFG Read More: The ASA's statement on p-values: context, process,and purpose http://amstat.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00031305.2016.1154108#aHR0cDovL2Ftc3RhdC50YW5kZm9ubGluZS5jb20vZG9pL3BkZi8xMC4xMDgwLzAwMDMxMzA1LjIwMTYuMTE1NDEwOEBAQDA= “Underpinning many published scientific conclusions is the concept of ‘statistical significance,’ typically assessed with an index called the p-value. While the p-value can be a useful statistical measure, it is commonly misused and misinterpreted.” Evolution of Reporting P Values in the Biomedical Literature, 1990-2015 http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2503172 “In this analysis of P values reported in MEDLINE abstracts and in PMC articles from 1990-2015...almost all abstracts and articles with P values reported statistically significant results, and, in a subgroup analysis, few articles included confidence intervals, Bayes factors, or effect sizes. Rather than reporting isolated P values, articles should include effect sizes and uncertainty metrics.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Lissette Padilla on Twitter https://twitter.com/lizzette DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The TestTube Mailing List: http://dne.ws/1McUJdm
Views: 117762 Seeker
La recherche dans la base de données Criminal Justice Abstracts
 
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Dans cette capsule, nous allons voir comment interroger la base de données Criminal Justice Abstracts, afin de trouver des articles scientifiques en criminologie.
Views: 238 Bibliothèques UdeM
Finding Sociology Articles With SocINDEX
 
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Learn how to use the SocINDEX With Full Text database to conduct research for your Sociology assignments.
Views: 241 NWACCLibrary
CRAIG E. MUNGER, M.D., PH.D.
 
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Dr. Craig Munger earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Ohio State University in Columbus, and his Master of Science degree in Toxicology from Texas A&M University in College Station. He then went on to complete a Ph.D. degree in Pharmacology/Toxicology from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, as well as a medical degree from the Medical College of Ohio in Toledo. Dr. Munger continued his training with an Internship in Internal Medicine and a Residency in Ophthalmology at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. This was followed by an Oculoplastic Fellowship in Orbital and Neuro-Ophthalmic Surgery at Kresge Eye Institute of Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. A staff member at Florida Eye Specialists and Cataract Institute since 1996, Dr. Munger is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He is also the author of numerous published journal articles and abstracts.
Writing Scientific Abstracts
 
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http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/LEADS
Alteryx Weekly Exercise #36
 
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Week 36 brought us a wonderful extract and transformation exercise. We were given a list of raw PubMed articles with abstracts, authors, and other information listed within a single column. The end result was to be presented horizontally with much less information. I hope this can help or show you something new and I encourage you to make suggestions!
Views: 182 John Heisler
Mining of PubMed Abstracts
 
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This presentation is about Chen and Sharp's paper. Their paper can be viewed at https://bmcbioinformatics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2105-5-147
Views: 454 Jeff Shaul