Home
Search results “Articles about social interaction”
Status &  Roles (Elements of Social Interaction) – Social Interaction | Lecturio
 
06:23
This video “Status & Roles (Elements of Social Interaction)” is part of the Lecturio course “Social Interaction” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/status ► LEARN ABOUT: - Relative states of status - Types of status - Social roles ► THE PROF: Dr. Tarry Ahuja is currently a senior medical real-world evidence scientist for a major pharmaceutical company and a lecturer at Carleton University, Canada. He has worked in the hospital setting and National Research Council of Canada for over 10 years. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/status ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Elements of Social Interaction http://lectur.io/statusarticle ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
How social media makes us unsocial | Allison Graham | TEDxSMU
 
12:47
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Social Media historian Allison Graham offers a witty and ironic view of a society that feels alone together despite the hundreds of virtual connections we have online. With a global population growing up via Facebook and Twitter and a perceptible shift in human interpersonal connections, the constant need for social self-validation permeates our daily existence. This talk shares the funny and revealing insights of a life lived online and how social media is used to connect and disconnect us. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, Allison has worked all over the country and globe bringing the written word to life on the big screen. Allison has worked for Artisan Entertainment, Universal Studios, Paramount Pictures, Warner Brothers, New Line Cinema, 20th Century Fox, Miramax and Dreamworks SKG as Assistant Director, Production Manager, and Producer working with such titans as Jerry Bruckheimer, Michael Bay, Timur Bekmamvetov and Tim Burton. She was one of the key business strategists behind The Blair Witch Franchise marketing campaigns, leading the team responsible for revolutionizing the way the Internet and film marketing were viewed. Allison enjoys cooking from scratch, bicycle rides on flat terrain, conga lines and diving boards. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 857221 TEDx Talks
How Is Your Phone Changing You?
 
03:12
Should you be worried about your cellphone? 6 Reasons For A Cellphone Vacation: https://youtu.be/RpmIkWfH2ks Subscribe: http://bit.ly/asapsci Written by Annik Carson, Rachel Salt, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 References/Further Reading: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/07/exploiting-the-neuroscience-of-internet-addiction/259820/ http://qz.com/626482/neuroscience-says-these-five-rituals-will-help-your-brain-stay-young/ (http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/chapter-three-a-week-in-the-life-analysis-of-smartphone-users/) http://time.com/3952333/smartphone-addiction/ https://www.ted.com/talks/jan_chipchase_on_our_mobile_phones?language=en http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21645180-smartphone-ubiquitous-addictive-and-transformative-planet-phones http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/the-future-is-here-whats-next-for-mobile-phones-180951479/?no-ist https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mental-mishaps/201401/cell-phones-are-changing-social-interaction http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/dec/31/cell-phones-promote-serious-social-psychological-i/ http://www.medicaldaily.com/out-sight-out-mind-cell-phones-may-diminish-cognitive-ability-even-without-use-313590 http://time.com/3616383/cell-phone-distraction/ http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2014/12/mere-presence-of-your-phone-is-distracting.html https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201312/why-are-public-cell-phone-users-so-annoying (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215001806)
Views: 3709142 AsapSCIENCE
Social Interaction and the 'Bliss Molecule'
 
04:20
This week on SciShow News, scientists found that social interaction triggers the production of the “bliss molecule” in mice. Plus, eating sugar is about more than just the calories. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Lilly Grainger, Happy Birthday!!, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: http://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2015-10/uoc--hh102215.php http://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2015-10/uoc--och102115.php http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2015/10/21/1509795112 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/275795.php http://www.livescience.com/24553-what-is-thc.html
Views: 240978 SciShow
The Ultimate Test of Your Social Skills
 
05:30
You’ll know you’ve truly become socially adept when you finally manage to make small talk with that most challenging and unforgiving of characters: a small child you hardly know. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/aLr91M Join our mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Or visit us in person at our London HQ https://goo.gl/tGq1RG FURTHER READING “It can be easy to imagine we possess reasonable social skills, because we know how to maintain a conversation with strangers and – every now and then – manage to make a whole table laugh. But there’s a test far sterner than this, surprising in its ability to trip us up: the challenge of having a pleasant time with a child we don’t know. Theoretically speaking, this should be so easy. We were all once kids. We know a great deal more than they do and – as far as they’re concerned – hold all the cards: if we felt like it, we could buy 26 packets of biscuits and go to bed whenever we wanted…” You can read more on this and other subjects on our blog, here: https://goo.gl/9APsau MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/y51g7f Watch more films on RELATIONSHIPS in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLrelationships You can submit translations and transcripts on all of our videos here: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7IcJI8PUf5Z3zKxnZvTBog&tab=2 Find out how more here: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623?hl=en-GB SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Martin Pickles http://martinpickles.com/ #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 921616 The School of Life
5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now
 
03:16
Your brain may never be the same! Watch our Q&A: http://youtu.be/thYzq0TEwbs Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. BOX 93, Toronto P, TORONTO, ON, M5S2S6 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Further Reading-- Abnormal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030253 Phantom vibrations among undergraduates: Prevalence and associated psychological characteristics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563212000799 Cognitive control in media multitaskers http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583.abstract?sid=113b39d8-d0b5-4f46-b2a5-362ee79d0b61 Amygdala Volume and Social Network Size in Humans http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3079404/ What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience? http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/research&labs/berridge/publications/Berridge&RobinsonBrResRev1998.pdf
Views: 4153795 AsapSCIENCE
8 Proven Ways to Stop Being Shy And Quiet
 
10:01
How to become more confident? Does the idea of social interaction send panic waves through your body? Yeah, it tends to do that for shy people. But even if you’ve been the quiet type your whole life, there are lots of things you can to do build your confidence, become more charismatic, and get rid of that social awkwardness for good! Do you know that advertising your shyness, you’re only trapping yourself in this label? People might not even see you as quiet or awkward until you bring it up! And from then on, they’ll only be able to see you that way. There’s nothing wrong with being “the shy one” but holding onto that label can really set you back if you sincerely wanna open up and be more conversational. Do you wanna learn more about that? Then watch our new video! Here are 8 tips on how to stop being shy! TIMESTAMPS: Replace your negative inner voice 0:58 Embrace your strengths 1:59 Offer information 3:07 Don’t advertise your shyness 4:05 Practice your body language 4:56 Start saying yes 6:01 Stay in the moment 7:02 Do the things you’re scared to do 8:00 #shyness #selfconfidence #introvert Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - If you have a tough inner voice constantly judging you super harshly and putting you down, then you’ll be more prone to removing yourself from social situations because you expect to be judged by others just as relentlessly. - Shy quiet people are just as smart, successful, competent, and interesting as extroverts. The only difference is that shy people might have a hard time talking about what makes them unique, so others don’t get a chance to notice it. - Being in a large group of friends or acquaintances can be an awkward experience for people who suffer from social anxiety. But still, don’t wait for others to ask how you’re doing, how your projects are going, or what you did this weekend. Take the initiative to tell your friends what’s going on in your life. - Body language tells you so much about a person. In social situations, people who feel awkward or shy might cross their arms or legs, avoid eye contact, angle their body away from others, stand or sit further away, or lower their head. They might also hide behind their phone or always keep it in hand. - If you’re shy, you’re probably skilled at declining invitations just to avoid social interaction. You might even come up with excuses or go out of your way to avoid someone or some event. But when you say “no,” you create a barrier that closes off opportunities. - If you’re out with a group of friends and you’ve said something incorrectly or you think you sounded foolish, it gets that critical inner voice going and you get so caught up in your self-demeaning thoughts that you totally disengage with what’s happening at the present time. - Overcoming shyness isn’t just about learning to talk to people, it’s also about the basic principle of doing the things you’re scared to do. You learned earlier that a fear of being judged usually plays a big part in being shy. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 592743 BRIGHT SIDE
The Attachment Theory - How Childhood Trauma Affects Your Life
 
07:36
The attachment theory argues that a strong emotional and physical bond to one primary caregiver in our first years of life, is critical to our development. If our bonding is strong and we are securely attached, then we feel safe to explore the world. If our bond is weak, we feel insecurely attached. We are afraid to leave or explore a rather scary-looking world. Because we are not sure if we can return. Often we then don't understand our own feelings. Special thanks for our patroeon supporters: Ville Medeiros, Chutimon Nuangnit, Cedric Wang, Mike, Eva Marie Koblin, Julien Dumesnil, Mathis and the others. You are wonderful !!! If you feel helpful and want to support our channel, write a comment, subscribe and spread the word or become a patron on www.patreon.com/sprouts. Full Script: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v82PcEvf_G2iolc5ejPY5dQ2RtqU1Vj9V5L_iIKWUhk/edit?usp=sharing Dealing with Attachment Issues: Dealing with Attachment Issues is no easy task. For those who feel like they can’t help themselves, or can’t find trust through their partners of family, we recommend looking for professional support through a therapy. If you are able to form a secure attachment to a therapist, he can become the one who provides you with that secure base. Here three of possible therapies: 1. Psychoanalysis. The aim of psychoanalysis therapy is to release repressed emotions and experiences, i.e., make the unconscious conscious. In order to do that they therapist might try to bring back some childhood memories, to work at the root cause of the problem. 2. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). CBT is a psycho-social intervention that is widely used for improving mental health. Instead of trying to bring you back in time, it aims to explain you whats going on inside your brain and how to cope with irrational feelings or fears. 3. The Hoffmann Process. This 7-8 days guided process, designed by the American psychologist Hoffmann, brings participants back into their childhood to reconnect with their parents at the time when attachment is formed. Its very intensive. Sources: Havard Study https://arizona.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/feelings-of-parental-caring-predict-health-status-in-midlife-a-35 Minnesota Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857405/ Further Readins: https://www.psychologistworld.com/developmental/attachment-theory
Views: 1433457 Sprouts
Value Social Interaction | The Winner's Minute With Mac Hammond
 
01:01
“Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up. Again, if two lie together, then they have heat: but how can one be warm alone? And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken.” –Ecclesiastes 4:9–12 Today's Winner's Minute is sponsored by Craig and Jane Harrison. Source of Quoted Material: https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-02-22/depressed-by-our-politics-stop-staring-at-your-phone http://www.mac-hammond.org | http://www.facebook.com/pastormachammond | https://twitter.com/winnersminute | http://www.machammond.com
Social Networking vs Social Interaction
 
03:56
We need your support http://patreon.com/geekanoids Social Networking vs Social Interaction I am the 'Geek Ambassador' for Hotspot Shield ... Get behind the Shield here http://bit.ly/GeekShield For a new tech & geek related video every day, be sure to subscribe to the channel http://bit.ly/subcribetome Use my Amazon links to give me credit ... it doesn't cost you a penny extra ... thank you. UK Viewers http://bit.ly/GeekUK USA Viewers http://bit.ly/GeekUSA France Viewers http://bit.ly/GeekFR Germany Viewers http://bit.ly/GeekDE Spain Viewers http://bit.ly/GeekES Italy Viewers ... http://bit.ly/GeekITA Download free Apps on iOS & Android and earn FREE money like me here http://featu.re/GEEKANOIDS Geekanoids Amazon Wishlist http://bit.ly/GeekAmaz Subscribe to our techy geeky Newsletter http://bit.ly/GeekNews Useful Links Website http://www.geekanoids.co.uk/ Twitter http://www.twitter.com/geekanoids/ Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekan0ids/ Google+ http://bit.ly/GeekGPlus Instagram http://instagram.com/geekanoids/ Tumblr http://geekanoids.tumblr.com/ Any Amazon links that appear in the video description are affiliate links. They do not alter the price you pay. Geekanoids earns a small commission on each sale.
Views: 2367 Geekanoids
How To Master Social Interactions with Kyle Ingham from The Distilled Man
 
16:57
For more of Kyle Ingham, click here: https://gentl.mn/kyle-ingham-distilled-man-interview 00:43 How did you come up with the name and what does it mean? 01:34 So is distilled, also does it mean you distil skills to the essentials for the men? 02:14 How would you say is the distilled man different from a gentleman? Or is it the same thing? 04:05 Do you have some more specific things of topics that you cover? 07:13 So apart from friendship and social skills, can you kind of drill down a little more? To what that means, and what you try to accomplish with it? 08:43 At Gentleman's Gazette, we always try to portray the gentleman as more than just the clothes that he's wearing. We talk about etiquette or architecture or simply good food, and things a gentleman should know, a cigar, wine, or scotch. Are you dwelling in areas like that as well? 11:08 You wrote an interesting article about how to inscribe a book. How did you come up with that? 12:29 So, what were your findings? Like what are the ground rules to inscribe a book? 14:38 What do you see the Distilled Man producing in the future? Do you have a certain path going forward or are you just looking at how it comes to you? #kyleingham #distilledman #notsponsored -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Most Popular videos: How to accept a compliment - https://youtu.be/_EKXNmM1PUo 101 things that change when you dress up - https://youtu.be/JyGDd_iYaCI How to tie a Bow Tie - https://youtu.be/2I3cfa0BOOc --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Want to stay updated? Sign up here for free: https://gentl.mn/2rXRJP9 Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our channel! https://www.youtube.com/user/thegentlemansgazette --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Gentleman's Gazette https://gentl.mn/2sWoYYd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gentlemansgazette FREE EBOOK: https://gentl.mn/2rXRJP9
Views: 7780 Gentleman's Gazette
Articles about social issues
 
01:50
Articles about social issues
Views: 147 Siddiqui Afroz Alam
Why Being Lonely Is Crucial For Survival
 
04:04
We all know it sucks to be lonely, but is it actually essential for our survival? Here's more on why loneliness might be a good thing. Why Loneliness Can Be Deadly - http://bit.ly/1PgaEdj Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: Social Relationships and Health: The Toxic Effects of Perceived Social Isolation http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4021390/ "Research in social epidemiology suggests that the absence of positive social relationships is a significant risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. The nature of these social relationships and the mechanisms underlying this association are of increasing interest as the population gets older and the health care costs associated with chronic disease escalate in industrialized countries." New Evidence for the Necessity of Loneliness https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160510-loneliness-center-in-the-brain/ "Cacioppo proposes that the root of social ties lies in their opposite - loneliness. According to his theory, the pain of being alone motivates us to seek the safety of companionship, which in turn benefits the species by encouraging group cooperation and protection. Loneliness persists because it provides an essential evolutionary benefit for social animals. Like thirst, hunger or pain, loneliness is an aversive state that animals seek to resolve, improving their long-term survival." The need to belong: Desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. http://psycnet.apa.org/?&fa=main.doiLanding&doi=10.1037/0033-2909.117.3.497 "A hypothesized need to form and maintain strong, stable interpersonal relationships is evaluated in light of the empirical literature. The need is for frequent, nonaversive interactions within an ongoing relational bond. Consistent with the belongingness hypothesis, people form social attachments readily under most conditions and resist the dissolution of existing bonds." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the Seeker Daily App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI
Views: 379726 Seeker
WIKIHOW IS MISLEADING
 
14:03
Today we are looking at photos from WikiHow, and trying to guess what the articles entail. I feel like I did pretty good, but it's a lot harder how it looks! MY TWITCH CHANNEL: https://www.twitch.tv/gloom SUBSCRIBE HERE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6IijBsVf2PlWo_uq6P9wQw?sub_confirmation=1 My INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/gloomykassie My TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/gloomykassie Get the game here: http://damn.dog/ Electrodoodle by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200079 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 932204 Gloom
The Science of Awkwardness
 
13:56
awkward......... Sources and extra links below! me on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce me on instagram: http://www.instagram.com/electricpants music by http://www.youtube.com/JakeChudnow Embarrassment and prosociality: http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~keltner/publications/FeinbergWillerKeltner2012.pdf Empathetic Embarrassment: http://www.npr.org/2014/07/19/332760081/the-opposite-of-schadenfreude-vicarious-embarrassment http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/05/why-your-embarassment-causes-me-so-much-pain/ Cringe subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/cringe awkward hug gifs: http://giphy.com/search/awkward-hug Embarrassment: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/11/embarrassment.aspx The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows (on YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/user/obscuresorrows “Why Are We Morbidly Curious?” (related Vsauce video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbdMMI6ty0o social rejection and physical pain: http://www.pnas.org/content/108/15/6270.full Social awkwardness and genetics: http://news.sciencemag.org/social-sciences/2009/11/socially-awkward-check-your-genes http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs53576 Psychology experiments that test the breaking of social norms are called “breaching experiments”: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaching_experiment Stage Fright: http://business.uni.edu/buscomm/Presentations/stagefright.html Oxytocin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxytocin http://www.psyneuen-journal.com/article/S0306-4530(13)00211-4/abstract?cc=y Oxytocin and fear/anxiety: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-07/nu-tlh072213.php negativity bias: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negativity_bias more negative emotions than positive: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156001/ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-the-name-love/201007/are-negative-emotions-more-important-positive-emotions Eleanor Roosevelt quote: http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/26110-you-wouldn-t-worry-so-much-about-what-others-think-of “in you 20s and 30s…” quote: http://www.ihhp.com/equotes/ The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows (on YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/user/obscuresorrows “sonder” gif: http://i.imgur.com/zxBZ0vF.gif
Views: 8451495 Vsauce
Is Social Media Hurting Your Mental Health? | Bailey Parnell | TEDxRyersonU
 
14:45
Scrolling through our social media feeds feels like a harmless part of our daily lives. But is it actually as harmless at seems? According to social media expert Bailey Parnell, our growing and unchecked obsession with social media has unintended long term consequences on our mental health. As social media continues to become part of the fabric of modern life – the “digital layer” – abstinence is becoming less of an option. Bailey think it’s high time we learned to practice safe social before it’s too late. What are the common triggers? How are they affecting you over time? How can you create a more positive experience online? Bailey covers this and more in “Is Social Media Hurting Your Mental Health?” Bailey Parnell was recently named one of Canada's Top 100 Most Powerful Women. She is an award-winning digital marketer, public speaker and businesswoman with a talent for helping people tell better stories. Her work and expertise have been featured on CBC, CTV & in other local Toronto media. Bailey recently founded SkillsCamp, a soft skills training company where they help people develop the essential skills needed for professional success. She also currently works in digital marketing at Ryerson University. Bailey is a frequent public speaker having spoken to more than 10 thousand people. She primarily speaks about social media, personal branding, and media and mental health. She guest lectured her first MBA class at 21-years-old and has been the youngest speaker as multiple academic conferences. She is currently pursuing her Masters in Communication and Culture with a research focus on social media and mental health, and holds an honours BA from the RTA School of Media at Ryerson. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 1109376 TEDx Talks
The social brain and its superpowers: Matthew Lieberman, Ph.D. at TEDxStLouis
 
17:58
Neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman explains that through his studies he's learned that our kryptonite is ignoring the importance of our social superpowers and by building on our social intuition, we can make ourselves smarter, happier, and more productive. In this TEDx Talk, Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience that reveals that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental than our need for food or shelter and that the social pain and pleasure we experience has just as much impact as physical pain and pleasure. TEDxStLouis was held at MX Movies in downtown St. Louis, Missouri on 9.19.13. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 201452 TEDx Talks
Has Social Media Finally Replaced Social Interaction? #112 (AUDIO)
 
30:24
We have a natural instinct to create connections and to interact with each other. The idea of connection has evolved over time from writing letters, greeting while passing by to now texting or sending an image to mirror what your feeling at that moment. Has social media become our new form of connection? ---- FOLLOW & SUBSCRIBE: Site: http://www.zodanddrea.com Read movie reviews, original articles, listen to the podcasts, subscribe to everything, give your own topics, and even post articles or seek to become a guest. Every Tuesday @ 9:00PM Arizona Time FOLLOW - Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/zodanddrea Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/zodanddrea Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/zodanddrea Snapchat: zodanddrea SUBSCRIBE - iTunes: http://znd.mx/itunes Google Play: http://znd.mx/googleplay YouTube: http://znd.mx/youtube Stitcher: http://znd.mx/stitcher SoundCloud: http://znd.mx/soundcloud Tunein: http://znd.mx/tunein RadioPublic: http://znd.mx/radiopublic PATREON: http://www.patreon.com/zodanddrea
10 Questions That'll Reveal Who You Really Are
 
10:27
Do you know who you really are? You might think you know yourself better than anyone else, but there may be some aspects of your personality that you either subconsciously don't want to accept or don’t even notice! Luckily, this test will open your eyes to your true self! TIMESTAMPS: What’s the first thing you see in this picture? 1:05 What’s the first thing you see in this image? 2:16 Take a look at this picture: who would you help first? 3:10 Choose the odd figure among these three. 4:32 Which door will you choose to survive? 5:04 Which coffee are you? 5:44 Imagine you're scuba diving and suddenly see a mermaid. What color is her tail? 7:12 While you’re diving, you also notice a fish. What does it look like? 7:52 You suddenly spot a beautiful shell lying on the seabed. What does it look like? 8:34 You reach the shore and look around on the beach. Are there any people there? 9:16 #personalitytest #trueself #revealtruth Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - If you first noticed a crocodile, you’re the type of person who sees the big picture. That could mean that you sometimes take the small details in life, like a walk in the park or a cup of hot coffee in the morning, for granted. - If you immediately saw faces, you're pretty people-oriented. You're an extrovert, which means you need to charge your battery through social interaction with others. - If you chose to help the guy in crutches, you’re a leader by nature. You're, organized, practical, and focused on your life and goals. People might find you a bit cold emotionally. - If you chose the gray figure, then you are a bona-fide perfectionist! Unlike the others, the gray one isn’t a square but a rectangle. - An experienced survivalist would choose door number two. While lions are known to survive without food for as long as a month, starving for two months will definitely kill the animal. - If you're an espresso, you’re more traditional and prefer to keep it simple. As for you double espressos, work means a lot to you. You're determined, responsible, and maybe a little impatient. - The color of the mermaid's tail shows how sociable you are and how well you interact with others. - If the fish you imagined is docile and inoffensive, chances are that you can confidently stand up for your opinion and defend the things you believe in. - The shell indicates how open you are towards the people around you. - If the beach is crowded, you're probably a social butterfly, constantly surrounded by friends and acquaintances. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 3509837 BRIGHT SIDE
Symbolic interactionism | Wikipedia audio article
 
26:53
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Symbolic interactionism 00:01:21 1 History 00:01:30 1.1 George Herbert Mead 00:03:30 1.2 Herbert Blumer 00:04:39 1.3 Other theorists 00:05:44 2 Assumptions, premises, and research methodology 00:05:56 2.1 Assumptions 00:07:08 2.2 Premises 00:10:04 2.3 Research methodology 00:11:08 3 Five central ideas 00:13:56 4 Central interactionist themes 00:16:11 5 New media 00:18:24 6 Criticisms 00:19:21 6.1 Framework and theories 00:20:57 6.2 Social structure 00:22:20 6.2.1 Language 00:23:10 6.2.2 Critical perspective 00:25:09 7 Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Symbolic interactionism is a sociological theory that develops from practical considerations and alludes to people's particular utilization of dialect to make images and normal implications, for deduction and correspondence with others. In other words, it is a frame of reference to better understand how individuals interact with one another to create symbolic worlds, and in return, how these worlds shape individual behaviors. It is a framework that helps understand how society is preserved and created through repeated interactions between individuals. The interpretation process that occurs between interactions help create and recreate meaning. It is the shared understanding and interpretations of meaning that affect the interaction between individuals. Individuals act on the premise of a shared understanding of meaning within their social context.Thus, interaction and behavior is framed through the shared meaning that objects and concepts have attached to them. Symbolic interactionism comes from a sociological perspective which developed around the middle of the twentieth century and that continues to be influential in some areas of the discipline. It is particularly important in microsociology and social psychology. It is derived from the American philosophy of pragmatism and particularly from the work of George Herbert Mead, as a pragmatic method to interpret social interactions.
Views: 22 wikipedia tts
Cellphones and Social Interactions
 
05:00
This video is about Cellphones and Social Interactions
Views: 129 Marcos Herrera
Human Interaction
 
04:56
Look it isn't personal, I just hate you all. JK I'm just incredibly lazy. Help. click here: http://youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=danisnotonfire to subscribe to my channel to see more of my videos :D and yo if you want to know what's happening in my life, you should follow me on twitter!! http://twitter.com/danisnotonfire srsly tho it's not all the time, but some days i just want to be in my own space! ..and i will be the worst and least interesting human you've ever met. but what about you?! if you are like me then tell me in the comments! or if you've ever irritated a friend or been irritated yourself by doing this, let us all know down below! haha :] WEEK 1 of the HAPPY1MILLIONSUBSCRIBERFOURWEEKFOURVIDEOTAKEOVER! woop. this took 29 hours to make. idek why. i plan to get back on my weekend schedule after this haha. TSHIRTS! http://districtlines.com/danisnotonfire Facebook: http://facebook.com/danisnotonfire Tumblr: http://danisnotonfire.tumblr.com
Views: 6871253 Daniel Howell
EYLF PLP Talking about practice especially  social cultural theory in childhood education
 
07:23
http://www.earlychildhoodeducationjobshq.com [read more updates, articles and program in early childhood education] Jenni Connor interviews Carmel Richardson, an early childhood educator from Canberra. Here Carmel explains about awareness and theory that inform the practices the early childhood educator engaged in. As the educator, they prepared a learning opportunity such playing in sandpit where children can learning about responsibility while, educator support, facilitate and observed the children social interaction. This is one great program in Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) PLP original source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_6blNs8DcE
Views: 5519 workzkids
Social determinism | Wikipedia audio article
 
09:52
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_determinism 00:00:50 1 Social determinism and ideology 00:03:49 2 Social determinism 00:06:09 3 Arguments against social determinism 00:09:26 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7864297931262837 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Social determinism is the theory that social interactions and constructs alone determine individual behavior (as opposed to biological or objective factors). Consider certain human behaviors, such as committing murder, or writing poetry. A social determinist would look only at social phenomena, such as customs and expectations, education, and interpersonal interactions, to decide whether or not a given person would exhibit any of these behaviors. They would discount biological and other non-social factors, such as genetic makeup, the physical environment, etc. Ideas about nature and biology would be considered to be socially constructed.
Views: 1 Subhajit Sahu
Social Media...Social Interaction - The Digital Diary by James Gaubert
 
01:23
Welcome to The Digital Diary an online digital Marketing Blog by James Gaubert. The purpose of this blog is to help give you hints, tips and tricks on how to improve your digital marketing presence. I have over 18 years digital marketing experience and am looking to create bite sized, easy to digest blog articles to help you today! I will be covering a whole host of topics including SEO (search engine optimisation), PPC (Pay-Per-Click), Social Media, websites and more! For more information please see my blog at www.the-digital-diary.com and you can even reach out to me directly at [email protected] Don't forget to subscribe for more great digital marketing insights!
Views: 13 The Digital Diary
Society | Wikipedia audio article
 
24:27
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Society 00:01:29 1 Etymology and usage 00:02:44 2 Conceptions 00:03:52 2.1 In political science 00:04:41 2.2 In sociology 00:07:56 3 Types 00:08:49 3.1 Pre-industrial 00:09:18 3.1.1 Hunting and gathering 00:10:47 3.1.2 Pastoral 00:12:01 3.1.3 Horticultural 00:13:39 3.1.4 Agrarian 00:15:13 3.1.5 Feudal 00:15:49 3.2 Industrial 00:17:16 3.3 Post-industrial 00:17:53 4 Contemporary usage 00:18:13 4.1 Western 00:19:06 4.2 Information 00:20:11 4.3 Knowledge 00:21:51 4.4 Other uses 00:22:57 5 See also 00:23:06 6 Notes 00:23:15 7 Further reading 00:23:23 8 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social relations) between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent of members. In the social sciences, a larger society often exhibits stratification or dominance patterns in subgroups. Insofar as it is collaborative, a society can enable its members to benefit in ways that would not otherwise be possible on an individual basis; both individual and social (common) benefits can thus be distinguished, or in many cases found to overlap. A society can also consist of like-minded people governed by their own norms and values within a dominant, larger society. This is sometimes referred to as a subculture, a term used extensively within criminology. More broadly, and especially within structuralist thought, a society may be illustrated as an economic, social, industrial or cultural infrastructure, made up of, yet distinct from, a varied collection of individuals. In this regard society can mean the objective relationships people have with the material world and with other people, rather than "other people" beyond the individual and their familiar social environment.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Blog Video # 2 - Social Interaction (Online VS Offline)
 
01:24
Blog Video # 2 - Social Interaction (Online VS Offline)
Views: 42 apowerfulwoman
SOCIAL INTERACTION(SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY)BY ZABIR SAEED BADAR
 
02:57
ZABIR SAEED is renowned as media strategist, public relations practitioner, communication educationist, research scholar and a writer of dozen of books in the fields of Journalism, Mass Communication, Pubic Relations, History and Current Affairs. The author is the son of the well known journalist poet and writer Saeed Badar and he is also the grandson of the celebrated punjabi poet and Religious scholar Hakeem Muhammad Yaqub Munir Azeemi. He is also known for his articles, columns, features, children stories and won many awards as best feature writer.
Views: 144 ZABIR SAEED BADAR
Society for Social Neuroscience | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:01
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Social_Neuroscience 00:00:44 History 00:01:28 See also 00:01:38 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8460466220030589 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Society for Social Neuroscience (S4SN) is a learned society headquartered at the University of Chicago that consists of neuroscientists, psychologists, social scientists, and physicians around the world whose research is focused on the study of the biological systems that implement social processes and behavior, or how the brain and nervous system implement social interaction. The mission of the society is to serve as an international, interdisciplinary, distributed gathering place to advance and foster scientific training, research, and applications in the field of social neuroscience.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Sociology | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:34:18
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sociology Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Sociology is the scientific study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture of everyday life. It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change or social evolution. Many sociologists aim to conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, while others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.The different traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance. As all spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to other subjects, such as health, medical, economy, military and penal institutions, the Internet, education, social capital, and the role of social activity in the development of scientific knowledge. The range of social scientific methods has also expanded. Social researchers draw upon a variety of qualitative and quantitative techniques. The linguistic and cultural turns of the mid-20th century led to increasingly interpretative, hermeneutic, and philosophic approaches towards the analysis of society. Conversely, the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s have seen the rise of new analytically, mathematically, and computationally rigorous techniques, such as agent-based modelling and social network analysis.Social research informs politicians and policy makers, educators, planners, legislators, administrators, developers, business magnates, managers, social workers, non-governmental organizations, non-profit organizations, and people interested in resolving social issues in general. There is often a great deal of crossover between social research, market research, and other statistical fields.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
Sociology of law | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:05:49
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sociology of law Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The sociology of law (or legal sociology) is often described as a sub-discipline of sociology or an interdisciplinary approach within legal studies. Some see sociology of law as belonging "necessarily" to the field of sociology, but others tend to consider it a field of research caught up between the disciplines of law and sociology. Still others regard it neither a subdiscipline of sociology nor a branch of legal studies but as a field of research on its own right within the broader social science tradition. Accordingly, it may be described without reference to mainstream sociology as "the systematic, theoretically grounded, empirical study of law as a set of social practices or as an aspect or field of social experience". It has been seen as treating law and justice as fundamental institutions of the basic structure of society mediating "between political and economic interests, between culture and the normative order of society, establishing and maintaining interdependence, and constituting themselves as sources of consensus, coercion and social control".Irrespective of whether sociology of law is defined as a sub-discipline of sociology, an approach within legal studies or a field of research in its own right, it remains intellectually dependent mainly on the traditions, methods and theories of mainstream sociology and, to a lesser extent, on other social sciences such as social anthropology, political science, social policy, criminology and psychology. As such, it reflects social theories and employs social scientific methods to study law, legal institutions and legal behavior.More specifically, sociology of law consists of various approaches to the study of law in society, which empirically examine and theorise the interaction between law, legal, non-legal institutions and social factors. Areas of socio-legal inquiry include the social development of legal institutions, forms of social control, legal regulation, the interaction between legal cultures, the social construction of legal issues, legal profession and the relation between law and social change. Sociology of law also benefits from and occasionally draws on research conducted within other fields such as comparative law, critical legal studies, jurisprudence, legal theory, law and economics and law and literature. Its object encompasses the historical movement of law and justice and their relentless contemporary construction such as in the field of jurisprudence focused on institutional questions conditioned by social and political situations, in interdisciplinary dominions such as criminology and through analysis of the economic efficiency and the social impact of legal norms.
Views: 70 wikipedia tts
ONLINE COMMENTS RUINED MY LIFE!
 
10:37
Do you have a social media account? I bet you do! I used to have one as well... until it turned my life upside down, well not the account, but all the online comments that I was receiving. I'll tell you a true story full of horror. I hope this horror story give you a good lesson. I used to have my own YouTube channel. I doubt any of you saw my videos, since I only had about 20 subscribers. I didn’t mind it being a small channel, I just enjoyed talking about whatever I want on camera and getting some feedback from others. However, about a month ago, I had to delete my channel because of this scary story that happened to me... cyberbullying. And make no mistake – I’m not some sort of delicate flower who can’t take a little criticism or stupid jokes from anonymous bullies. What happened to me was much worse… I’ve never been a popular kid with lots of friends, I’m more of a loner. That’s why creating a YouTube channel seemed like a great way to speak out and get some problems off my chest. And if, in the long run, it might have made me famous or popular, well, that would’ve been a cool bonus! So I asked my parents for a camera for my birthday and launched my channel. For a couple months, I kept posting videos with no feedback or even views. But after a while, I finally got my first few subscribers! Some of them were “silent watchers” while others left comments and even liked my videos. I was ecstatic! This social interaction was a welcomed escape from the loneliness of my real life. I never told anyone about my videos – not even my parents or my older brother. I felt safe talking about whatever I wanted, thinking that nobody who knows me “irl” would find those videos and watch them. One Saturday morning I woke up and turned on my computer to check the comments on the video that I’d posted the night before. Imagine my surprise when instead of about 8 or 10 views and a couple of comments, I had about 500 comments! I was still a little sleepy and couldn’t understand what happened. After I got myself a glass of juice and finally took a closer look, I barely held back the tears: all those comments were straight up vicious bullying! Some were mocking my appearance, others the way I talk. They were making fun of my videos and even threatening me! I couldn’t believe it! How did all those people even find my channel, and why would they be so mean? Well, the tears started rolling down my cheeks, so I took a moment to calm down. After I’d finally stopped crying, I looked through some of those commenters’ profiles – all of them were totally empty with weird nicknames and no videos added. It almost seemed as if they were specifically created to bully people like me. That’s when the tears came right back yet again. I deleted all those comments, and it made me feel a little bit better. I still couldn’t explain how or why this was happening to me, but I thought, “Maybe if I don’t encourage the trolls with a reaction, they’ll just go away to torture someone else.” My mom called me downstairs to help with some chores, so I left my computer. When I came back after a few hours, man, I was so not ready for what was waiting for me there! About 10 of my last videos had new comments – hundreds of them and all containing nothing but threats and ridicule. I froze in front of the screen, scrolling through multiple comments saying “what an idiot” and “you’re worthless and stupid” and lots of horrible things. I started bawling my eyes out – it was too much for me to handle. “What did I do to deserve this, and how do I make it stop!?” My first impulse was to shut the comment section off, but… it felt like a weakness. The whole point of me making videos for my channel was to get some feedback on my thoughts, to communicate and interact with the world the way I couldn’t in real life. I decided to find out who was behind all of this.... Music: Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Music: Youtube Library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music Subscribe to 7-Second Riddles: https://goo.gl/BZSTVh -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Join us on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/7Second.Riddles/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/7second.riddles/ Website: https://brightside.me/wonder-quizzes/ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 419832 7-Second Riddles
What is Sociology? Explain Sociology, Define Sociology, Meaning of Sociology
 
02:33
#Sociology #audioversity ~~~ Sociology ~~~ Title: What is Sociology? Explain Sociology, Define Sociology, Meaning of Sociology Created on: 2019-01-19 Source Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sociology ------ Description: Sociology is the scientific study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture of everyday life. It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change or social evolution. While some sociologists conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.The different traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance. As all spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to other subjects, such as health, medical, economy, military and penal institutions, the Internet, education, social capital, and the role of social activity in the development of scientific knowledge. The range of social scientific methods has also expanded. Social researchers draw upon a variety of qualitative and quantitative techniques. The linguistic and cultural turns of the mid-20th century led to increasingly interpretative, hermeneutic, and philosophic approaches towards the analysis of society. Conversely, the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s have seen the rise of new analytically, mathematically, and computationally rigorous techniques, such as agent-based modelling and social network analysis.Social research informs politicians and policy makers, educators, planners, legislators, administrators, developers, business magnates, managers, social workers, non-governmental organizations, non-profit organizations, and people interested in resolving social issues in general. There is often a great deal of crossover between social research, market research, and other statistical fields. ------ To see your favorite topic here, fill out this request form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScU0dLbeWsc01IC0AaO8sgaSgxMFtvBL31c_pjnwEZUiq99Fw/viewform ------ Source: Wikipedia.org articles, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Support: Donations can be made from https://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Ways_to_Give to support Wikimedia Foundation and knowledge sharing.
Views: 256 Audioversity
Games and learning | Wikipedia audio article
 
12:09
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Games_and_learning 00:00:53 1 Research 00:07:31 2 Application 00:09:33 3 Controversy 00:11:42 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Games and learning is a field of education research that studies what is learned by playing video games, and how the design principles, data and communities of video game play can be used to develop new learning environments. Video games create new social and cultural worlds – worlds that help people learn by integrating thinking, social interaction, and technology, all in service of doing things they care about. Computers and other technologies have already changed the way students learn. Integrating games into education has the potential to create new and more powerful ways to learn in schools, communities and workplaces. Games and learning researchers study how the social and collaborative aspects of video game play can create new kinds of learning communities. Researchers also study how the data generated by game play can be used to design the next generation of learning assessments.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Social Interactions are a Two-Way Street! It's Not Always Your Fault
 
12:26
Jennifer Aniston Interview Prank: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbB_NkQrDr4 If you like these videos, subscribe to be notified when new videos are out, it's free: http://bit.ly/WillYouLaugh Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/willyoulaugh Follow me on Google Plus for interesting pics/articles: https://plus.google.com/b/117029641137203033711/117029641137203033711/posts Facebook: http://facebook.com/willyoulaugh Instagram: http://instagram.com/TheWillChou Vine: http://vine.co/WillChou Blog: http://highhopesanddreams.wordpress.com Leave a comment below with your opinions!
Society | Wikipedia audio article
 
31:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society 00:01:59 1 Etymology and usage 00:03:36 2 Conceptions 00:05:04 2.1 In political science 00:06:08 2.2 In sociology 00:10:28 3 Types 00:11:37 3.1 Pre-industrial 00:12:15 3.1.1 Hunting and gathering 00:14:13 3.1.2 Pastoral 00:15:50 3.1.3 Horticultural 00:18:01 3.1.4 Agrarian 00:20:07 3.1.5 Feudal 00:20:53 3.2 Industrial 00:22:48 3.3 Post-industrial 00:23:36 4 Contemporary usage 00:24:00 4.1 Western 00:25:08 4.2 Information 00:26:32 4.3 Knowledge 00:28:43 4.4 Other uses 00:30:09 5 See also 00:30:18 6 Notes 00:30:27 7 Further reading 00:30:37 8 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7707616158438312 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social relations) between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent of members. In the social sciences, a larger society often exhibits stratification or dominance patterns in subgroups. Insofar as it is collaborative, a society can enable its members to benefit in ways that would not otherwise be possible on an individual basis; both individual and social (common) benefits can thus be distinguished, or in many cases found to overlap. A society can also consist of like-minded people governed by their own norms and values within a dominant, larger society. This is sometimes referred to as a subculture, a term used extensively within criminology. More broadly, and especially within structuralist thought, a society may be illustrated as an economic, social, industrial or cultural infrastructure, made up of, yet distinct from, a varied collection of individuals. In this regard society can mean the objective relationships people have with the material world and with other people, rather than "other people" beyond the individual and their familiar social environment.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Computational sociology | Wikipedia audio article
 
24:16
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Computational sociology 00:01:28 1 History 00:01:36 1.1 Background 00:03:29 1.2 Systems theory and structural functionalism 00:05:07 1.3 Macrosimulation and microsimulation 00:06:32 1.4 Cellular automata and agent-based modeling 00:09:34 1.5 Data mining and social network analysis 00:11:55 1.6 Computational content analysis 00:13:07 2 Challenges 00:13:28 2.1 Levels and their interactions 00:15:24 2.2 Culture modeling 00:16:01 2.3 Experimentation and evaluation 00:16:33 2.4 Model choice and model complexities 00:16:58 2.4.1 Generative models 00:17:34 2.4.2 Heterogeneous or ensemble models 00:18:14 3 Impact 00:18:29 3.1 Impact on science 00:18:57 3.2 Impact on society 00:19:27 4 Journals and academic publications 00:19:53 5 Associations, conferences and workshops 00:20:14 6 Academic programs, departments and degrees 00:21:17 7 Centers and institutes 00:21:26 7.1 USA 00:22:42 7.2 Europe 00:23:29 7.3 Asia 00:23:44 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Computational sociology is a branch of sociology that uses computationally intensive methods to analyze and model social phenomena. Using computer simulations, artificial intelligence, complex statistical methods, and analytic approaches like social network analysis, computational sociology develops and tests theories of complex social processes through bottom-up modeling of social interactions.It involves the understanding of social agents, the interaction among these agents, and the effect of these interactions on the social aggregate. Although the subject matter and methodologies in social science differ from those in natural science or computer science, several of the approaches used in contemporary social simulation originated from fields such as physics and artificial intelligence. Some of the approaches that originated in this field have been imported into the natural sciences, such as measures of network centrality from the fields of social network analysis and network science. In relevant literature, computational sociology is often related to the study of social complexity. Social complexity concepts such as complex systems, non-linear interconnection among macro and micro process, and emergence, have entered the vocabulary of computational sociology. A practical and well-known example is the construction of a computational model in the form of an "artificial society", by which researchers can analyze the structure of a social system.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Social determinism | Wikipedia audio article
 
08:49
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Social determinism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Social determinism is the theory that social interactions and constructs alone determine individual behavior (as opposed to biological or objective factors). Consider certain human behaviors, such as committing murder, or writing poetry. A social determinist would look only at social phenomena, such as customs and expectations, education, and interpersonal interactions, to decide whether or not a given person would exhibit any of these behaviors. They would discount biological and other non-social factors, such as genetic makeup, the physical environment, etc. Ideas about nature and biology would be considered to be socially constructed.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Dance your PhD 2017- Parent-child interaction (Ines Van keer)
 
05:59
Dance interpretation of the ongoing PhD thesis of Ines Van keer, who is studying parent-child interactions in young children with a significant cognitive and motor developmental delay. Music by Drehz (Dream, Heart Cry & Prision of decision) with artist's permission (obtained through e-mail on 18-06-2016) Expecting a child to come into the world, into a parent's life, is accompanied by hopes and dreams and a sense of what is yet to come. However, when the child does not develop as expected, in the womb or after birth, parents are faced with a challenging uncertainty. In children with a significant cognitive and motor developmental delay, behavioral patterns are often 'idiosyncratic', unique, and profoundly challenges those around them to get to know them. For these children, being attentive to and taking initiatives towards caregivers and the environment is very important since these skills support their further development. By interacting with their child, parents are provided with the opportunity to stimulate these interactive engagement behaviors in their children, and thus foster their development. Parent-child interactions can be characterized by different interactive qualities, such as parental responsiveness, affect, achievement orientation and directiveness. As a researcher, I want to take a look at these behavioral patterns, of the parent as well as the child, and examine their interrelatedness. This might prove to be a complex and challenging task, since the direction as well as the magnitude of the influence might be different in every parent-child dyad. More information on the Phd-project and related articles can be found at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ines_Van_Keer and https://www.kuleuven.be/wieiswie/en/person/00099810
Views: 4937 Ines Van keer
Sociology | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:35:00
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sociology 00:02:09 1 History 00:02:18 1.1 Origins 00:07:55 1.2 Foundations of the academic discipline 00:12:31 1.3 Positivism and anti-positivism 00:12:41 1.3.1 Positivism 00:15:45 1.3.2 Anti-positivism 00:21:38 1.4 Other developments 00:24:54 2 Theoretical traditions 00:25:04 2.1 Classical theory 00:26:39 2.1.1 Functionalism 00:28:23 2.1.2 Conflict theory 00:29:38 2.1.3 Symbolic Interactionism 00:31:11 2.1.4 Utilitarianism 00:32:26 2.2 20th-century social theory 00:34:38 2.2.1 Pax Wisconsana 00:35:54 2.2.2 Structuralism 00:37:30 2.2.3 Post-structuralism 00:38:15 3 Central theoretical problems 00:39:03 3.1 Subjectivity and objectivity 00:40:46 3.2 Structure and agency 00:41:49 3.3 Synchrony and diachrony 00:43:19 4 Research methodology 00:45:53 4.1 Sampling 00:46:45 4.2 Methods 00:49:18 4.3 Computational sociology 00:50:50 5 Scope and topics 00:50:59 5.1 Culture 00:53:14 5.1.1 Art, music and literature 00:54:29 5.2 Criminality, deviance, law and punishment 00:55:24 5.2.1 Sociology of law 00:56:22 5.3 Communications and information technologies 00:56:48 5.3.1 Internet and digital media 00:58:02 5.3.2 Media 00:58:43 5.4 Economic sociology 01:00:13 5.4.1 Work, employment, and industry 01:00:53 5.5 Education 01:01:55 5.6 Environment 01:02:58 5.6.1 Human ecology 01:03:36 5.6.2 Social pre-wiring 01:05:56 5.7 Family, gender, and sexuality 01:08:00 5.8 Health, illness, and the body 01:09:13 5.8.1 Death, dying, bereavement 01:09:39 5.9 Knowledge and science 01:11:23 5.10 Leisure 01:12:03 5.11 Peace, war, and conflict 01:13:17 5.12 Political sociology 01:15:00 5.13 Population and demography 01:15:57 5.14 Public sociology 01:16:55 5.15 Race and ethnic relations 01:17:49 5.16 Religion 01:19:14 5.17 Social change and development 01:21:14 5.18 Social networks 01:22:55 5.19 Social psychology 01:24:07 5.20 Stratification, poverty and inequality 01:26:53 5.21 Urban and rural sociology 01:28:03 5.21.1 Community sociology 01:29:09 6 Other academic disciplines 01:34:09 7 Journals 01:34:38 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Sociology is the scientific study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture of everyday life. It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change or social evolution. While some sociologists conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.The different traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance. As all spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to other subjects, such as health, medical, economy, military and penal institutions, the Internet, education, social capital, and the role of social activity in the development of scientific knowledge. The range of social scientific methods has also expanded. Social researchers draw upon a variety of qualitative and quantitative techniques. The linguistic and cultural turns of the mid-20th century led to increasingly interpretative, hermeneutic, and philosophic approaches towards the analysis of society. Conversely, the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s have seen the rise of new analytically, mathematically, and computationally rigorous techniques, such as agent-based modelling and social network analysis.Social research informs politicians and policy makers, educators, planners, legislators, administrators, developers, business magnates, managers, social workers, non-governmental organizations, non-profit organizations, ...
Views: 40 wikipedia tts
Why You Should Social Dance: Emotional & Health Benefits
 
10:08
If you want to improve your health, memory, reduce stress and become confident in social settings, this video is for you! I share three scientifically backed up reasons, why you should try dancing - especially social dancing! Share this video with friends, who you think would benefit from social dance in their lives! Articles on masculine & feminine energies: The Importance of Balanced Feminine and Masculine Energies - https://www.kristintaylorintuitive.com/importance-balanced-feminine-masculine-energies/ Surrendering To Masculine Energy - www.thefemininewoman.com/surrendering-to-masculine-energy/ If you have trouble meeting new people, try social dancing! There is a study from The University of Oxford - that found out that dancing in music encourages social bonding. Moving in the beat with others lights up brain pathways, that lowers barriers against strangers and you feel a sense of connection with the person you don’t know http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01096/full It’s a quality social activity - you go to parties -with a primary reason to dance. People who dance are usually very interesting people, who push themselves and try new things instead of sitting home watching TV. Dancing is a therapy for shyness. It help with Social Skills - Self-Confidence - Self-Esteem With dancing you can be the life of the party even if you’re a shy introvert! “A study by the American Medical Association found that young girls had more positive thoughts and felt more confidence after dancing. http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/1390784 It improves your self-esteem, for decades therapists have prescribed dancing as an effective therapy for people who suffer from social anxiety or fear public speaking. 3. health benefits - enjoyable exercise, that doesn’t feel like exercise + like meditation - relieves stress,requires full presence, improves your memory Dancing is an Exercise that’s fun! (that’s why zumba is so popular) When you go crazy in dancing, you can burn more than 300 calories in 30 mins, which is the same as you would burn during easy run or swim. Even dances like kizomba would burn as much calories as cycling or walking. Dancing demands a lot of energy because it requires you to move in all directions. Many hospitals & rehab facilities offer dance therapy like (gohealthysteps.com). Dancing improves your balance According to Centers for Disease control research, over the age of 65 one out of every three adults will fall. Once thing that helps is dancing! You constantly practice balance and train leg muscles - this will help to prevent falling and decrease the risk of injuries. Basketball, football you need to quit after traumas - you never need to quit dancing! Dancing is free flowing, you can adjust it as you feel comfortable. Dance is a great stress reliever & reduce depression Music in general helps people feel better, but mix it with the effects of dancing and you get a double shot of happiness and presence! Though other forms of exercise can have many of the same benefits, dancing is more appealing because it’s movement / social interaction and fun mixed together - according to 20 year research by authors of "The Arts of Psychotherapy” - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0197455613001676 Dancing improves your memory Dance forces you to have a good mind / body connection, which is very important in the world, where everything is done for you. You don’t need to remember phone numbers, street numbers anymore…you can use transport everywhere you go. According to the research published on New England Journal of Medicine dancing on regular basis can reduce by 76% the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. - http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa022252 . It also can help people with Parkinson’s disease according to this study - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2780534/ … Bonus: The touch aspect of dancing is the hidden biggest benefit in social dancing. You spend most of the time being very close, in hug position. ★★★ ♪♫ ♪♫ Music: ♪♫ ♪♫ Bamboo Flute kizomba rmx by E.S. Production - https://soundcloud.com/denise-navotti/bamboo-flute-kizomba-rmx-by-e ♪♫ ♪♫ DJ Lenhy - Somo Love - https://soundcloud.com/loic-largen/somo-love Video credits to ocean waves - Huge Ocean Waves Crashing on Rocks - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjPgeXHjM9k&t=198s ♪♫ ♪♫ ★★★
Views: 1994 OnKizomba - Dainis
Improving Your Social Skills
 
12:44
Coach Corey Wayne discusses a simple way to improve your social skills to lose your fear of women so you can interact with them effectively to create attraction & easily get phone numbers, get dates & get laid! If you have not read my book, “How To Be A 3% Man” yet, that would be a good starting place for you. It is available in Kindle, iBook, Paperback, Hardcover or Audio Book format. If you don't have a Kindle device, you can download a free eReader app from Amazon so you can read my book on any laptop, desktop, smartphone or tablet device. Kindle $9.99, iBook $9.99, Paperback $29.99 or Hardcover 49.99. Audio Book is Free $0.00 with an Audible membership trial or buy it for $19.95. Here is the link to Audible to get the audiobook version: http://bit.ly/CCW3Man Here is the link to Amazon to purchase Kindle, Paperback or Hardcover version: http://amzn.to/1XKRtxd Here is the link to the iBookstore to purchase iBook version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/how-to-be-3-man-winning-heart/id948035350?mt=11&uo=6&at=1l3vuUo Here is the link to the iTunes store to purchase the iTunes audio book version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/audiobook/how-to-be-a-3-man-unabridged/id1106013146?at=1l3vuUo&mt=3 You can get my second book, “Mastering Yourself, How To Align Your Life With Your True Calling & Reach Your Full Potential” which is also available in Kindle $9,99, iBook $9.99, Paperback $49.99, Hardcover $99.99 and Audio Book format $24.95. Audio Book is Free $0.00 with an Audible membership trial. Here is the link to Audible to get the audiobook version: http://bit.ly/CCWMY Here is the link to Amazon to purchase Kindle, Paperback or Hardcover version: https://amzn.to/2TQV2Xo Here is the link to the iBookstore to purchase iBook version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/mastering-yourself-how-to-align-your-life-your-true/id1353139487?mt=11&at=1l3vuUo Here is the link to the iTunes store to purchase the iTunes audio book version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/audiobook/mastering-yourself-how-to-align-your-life-your-true/id1353594955?mt=3&at=1l3vuUo Here is the link to purchase Official Coach Corey Wayne branded merchandise (T-Shirts, Mugs, etc.): https://teespring.com/stores/coach-corey-wayne Click the link below to book phone/Skype (audio only) coaching with me personally: http://www.understandingrelationships.com/products Click the link below to make a donation via PayPal to support my work: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=LKGTSSLYJ93J6 Click the link below to read my FREE self-help articles: http://www.understandingrelationships.com/ From my heart to yours, Corey Wayne
Views: 185173 Coach Corey Wayne
Sociology of gender | Wikipedia audio article
 
31:26
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sociology of gender 00:00:34 1 Introduction 00:01:28 2 In feminist theory 00:02:37 3 Other languages 00:03:34 4 U.S. media 00:04:17 4.1 Oppression 00:04:46 4.2 Objectification of women 00:05:26 5 Gender and socialization 00:10:05 5.1 Atypical Household Influence on Gender Socialization 00:11:35 6 Gender and psychoanalysis 00:13:20 7 Gender and the division of labor 00:14:54 8 Gender in conversation 00:15:29 8.1 Gender in the workplace 00:17:01 9 Intersectionality 00:18:57 10 Embodiment 00:20:54 11 Sexuality 00:23:04 12 Masculinity 00:25:49 13 Gender and violence 00:28:18 14 Globalization and gender 00:30:10 15 Third gender 00:30:59 16 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Sociology of gender is a prominent subfield of sociology. Social interaction directly correlated with sociology regarding social structure. One of the most important social structures is status. This is determined based on position that an individual possesses which effects how he/she will be treated by society. One of the most important statuses an individual claims is gender. Public discourse and the academic literature generally use the term gender for the perceived or projected (self-identified) masculinity or femininity of a person.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Anthony Wilden | Wikipedia audio article
 
05:36
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Wilden 00:03:03 1 Selected writings and publications Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.969692768664782 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anthony Wilden (14 December 1935, London, England) is a writer, social theorist, college lecturer, and consultant. Wilden has published numerous books and articles which intersect a number of fields, including systems theory, film theory, structuralism, cybernetics, psychiatry, anthropological theory, water control projects, urban ecosystems, resource conservation, and communications and social relations.Wilden is credited with one of the first significant introductions to the work of Jacques Lacan in the Anglo-Saxon world, particularly in his role as one of Lacan's early English translators. Today Wilden's work (and consequent reputation) is arguably more influential in the fields of communication theory, ecology and social interaction. These fields of study evolved out of a long scholarly tradition of "interactional semiotics" that originated with Plato's Cratylus. Along with such figures as Gregory Bateson (i.e., Steps to an Ecology of Mind), R. D. Laing (i.e., Sanity, Madness and the Family), and Walker Percy (i.e., Lost in the Cosmos), Wilden is considered one of this tradition's contemporary (modern and postmodern) pioneers.With the appearance of System and Structure (1972), Wilden sought "to establish the necessity of an ecosystemic or ecological approach to communication and exchange in open systems of all types", to use his own words. In hindsight it is recognized that System and Structure was an early contribution to a "theory of self-referential systems". According to Niklas Luhmann, this "theory of self-referential systems" is the second paradigm change in a "General System Theory" (the first change being the "open-systems" or "systems/environment" shift, a step that initially separated "systems theory" from the traditional "whole-parts" paradigm). Through his teaching and writings, Wilden has provided "a contribution to our 'knowledge about knowledge' at an abstract level, as well as supplying ammunition in the struggle with the concrete reality that information is power and that scientific discourse is a hidden weapon in the arsenal of social control." Wilden is also recognized today for his significant contributions to Context theory and Second-order cybernetics. Wilden was a professor in the Communications Department at Simon Fraser University from the 1970s to the mid-1990s. He has attended the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, 1960–1961, 1963–1965; and Johns Hopkins University, earning his PhD in 1968.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
26 PSYCHOLOGY FACTS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT PEOPLE
 
05:03
Learning something new about yourself is always interesting and entertaining. And understanding the psychology behind the way we behave, treat others, and express ourselves can be even more appealing. Today, we here at Bright Side have compiled a list of the most surprising psychology facts that can help you better understand yourself and others. Other videos you might like: 10 Psychology Problems Caused by Parenting Behavior https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_eJPX-OI7c& 13 Psychology Tricks That Work On Anybody https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSvxuekIVuk& 12 Smart Psychological Tips You'd Better Learn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szahr27ReQo& SUMMARY: - Any friendship that begins in the period between 16 and 28 years of age is more likely to be robust and long-lasting. - Women generally prefer men with deep husky voices because they seem more confident and not aggressive. - The smarter the person is, the faster he thinks, and the sloppier his handwriting is. - Our emotions don’t affect the way we communicate. In fact, the way we communicate has an influence on our mood. - The way a person treats restaurant staff reveals a lot about their character. - People who have a strong sense of guilt understand others’ thoughts and feelings better. - Men are not funnier than women. They just make more jokes, not caring whether others like their humor or not. - Shy people talk little about themselves, but they do this in a way that makes other people feel that they know them very well. - Women have twice as many pain receptors in their bodies than men, but they have a much higher pain tolerance. - Listening to high-frequency music makes you feel calm, relaxed, and happy. - If you can’t stop your stream of thoughts at night, get up and write them down. This trick will set your mind at ease so you can sleep. - Good morning and good night text messages activate the part of the brain responsible for happiness. - Doing things that scare you will make you happier. - The average amount of time a woman can keep a secret is 47 hours and 15 minutes. - People who try to keep everyone happy often end up feeling the loneliest. - The happier we are, the less sleep we require. - When you hold the hand of your beloved, you feel less pain and worry less. - Intelligent people have fewer friends than the average person. The smarter the person is, the more selective they are. - Marrying your best friend eliminates the risk of divorce by over 70%. This marriage is more likely to last a lifetime. - The people who give the best advice are usually the ones with the most problems. - Women who have mostly male friends stay in a good mood more often. - People who speak two languages may unconsciously shift their personalities when they switch from one language to another. - Being alone for a long time is as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. - Travel boosts brain health and decreases a person’s risk of heart attack and depression. - People look more attractive when they speak about the things they are interested in. - When two people talk to each other, and one of them turns their feet slightly away or repeatedly moves one foot in an outward direction, this is a sign of disagreement. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2971027 BRIGHT SIDE
Cyber-ethnography | Wikipedia audio article
 
17:17
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Cyber-ethnography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Cyber-ethnography, also known as virtual ethnography, and most commonly online ethnography, is an online research method that adapts ethnographic methods to the study of the communities and cultures created through computer-mediated social interaction. Online ethnography has by far the wider use. As modifications of the term ethnography, cyber-ethnography, online ethnography and virtual ethnography (as well as many other methodological neologisms) designate particular variations regarding the conduct of online fieldwork that adapts ethnographic methodology. There is no canonical approach to cyber-ethnography that prescribes how ethnography is adapted to the online setting. Instead individual researchers are left to specify their own adaptations. Netnography is another form of online ethnography or cyber-ethnography with more specific sets of guidelines and rules, and a common multidisciplinary base of literature and scholars. This article is not about a particular neologism, but the general application of ethnographic methods to online fieldwork as practiced by anthropologists, sociologists, and other scholars.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Shoaling and schooling | Wikipedia audio article
 
41:15
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoaling_and_schooling 00:01:10 1 Overview 00:06:35 2 Social interaction 00:07:29 3 Foraging advantages 00:10:58 4 Reproductive advantages 00:12:47 5 Hydrodynamic efficiency 00:13:50 6 Predator avoidance 00:19:31 7 Predator countermeasures 00:23:04 8 How fish school 00:25:23 9 Describing shoal structure 00:28:28 10 Modelling school behaviour 00:28:37 10.1 Mathematical models 00:30:35 10.2 Evolutionary models 00:31:12 11 Mapping the formation of schools 00:32:26 12 Leadership and decision-making 00:34:48 13 Shoal choice 00:38:04 14 Commercial fishing 00:38:37 15 Further examples 00:41:02 16 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9535654071492627 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In biology, any group of fish that stay together for social reasons are shoaling (pronounced /ˈʃoʊlɪŋ/), and if the group is swimming in the same direction in a coordinated manner, they are schooling (pronounced /ˈskuːlɪŋ/). In common usage, the terms are sometimes used rather loosely. About one quarter of fish species shoal all their lives, and about one half shoal for part of their lives.Fish derive many benefits from shoaling behaviour including defence against predators (through better predator detection and by diluting the chance of individual capture), enhanced foraging success, and higher success in finding a mate. It is also likely that fish benefit from shoal membership through increased hydrodynamic efficiency. Fish use many traits to choose shoalmates. Generally they prefer larger shoals, shoalmates of their own species, shoalmates similar in size and appearance to themselves, healthy fish, and kin (when recognized). The "oddity effect" posits that any shoal member that stands out in appearance will be preferentially targeted by predators. This may explain why fish prefer to shoal with individuals that resemble themselves. The oddity effect thus tends to homogenize shoals.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Social determinism | Wikipedia audio article
 
08:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Social determinism 00:00:41 1 Social determinism and ideology 00:03:08 2 Social determinism 00:05:03 3 Arguments against social determinism 00:07:42 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Social determinism is the theory that social interactions and constructs alone determine individual behavior (as opposed to biological or objective factors). Consider certain human behaviors, such as committing murder, or writing poetry. A social determinist would look only at social phenomena, such as customs and expectations, education, and interpersonal interactions, to decide whether or not a given person would exhibit any of these behaviors. They would discount biological and other non-social factors, such as genetic makeup, the physical environment, etc. Ideas about nature and biology would be considered to be socially constructed.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
7 Reasons to Let Your Children Play Outdoors
 
01:03
Letting your children play outdoors can be very beneficial to their health. Activities such as exercise, sun exposure and social interaction all play a vital role in your children's development. Subscribe for the latest health news: https://articles.mercola.com/subscribe.aspx Visit our website: https://www.mercola.com Listen to our podcasts: https://www.mercola.com/downloads/podcast.htm Find us on Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/doctor.health MeWe: https://mewe.com/p-front/dr.josephmercola Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drmercola Twitter: https://twitter.com/mercola
Views: 1665 Mercola