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Videos uploaded by user “Lammas Science”
Total Internal Reflection
 
02:12
BBC Bitesize Top 20 Demos
Views: 41931 Lammas Science
States of Matter - Melting Points
 
02:02
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 28760 Lammas Science
Magnets - History of Magnetism
 
02:12
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 33844 Lammas Science
Background Radiation
 
02:27
CH4 Clipbank: JG446249 Detecting Radiation
Views: 14402 Lammas Science
Plant Structure
 
02:10
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 17699 Lammas Science
Structure of the lungs
 
02:20
The Lungs, Heart and Blood CH4 Clipbank JG446222
Views: 7626 Lammas Science
Displacement Reactions
 
02:39
CH4 Clipbank: JG446214 Displacement Reactions
Views: 20912 Lammas Science
Acids, Bases & Salts
 
05:23
BBC Bitesize AQA Additional Science Acids have a pH of less than 7. Bases have a pH of more than 7. Find out more about them in this activity
Views: 4370 Lammas Science
4  Why did the brown bear evolve into the polar bear
 
04:25
Just So Darwin Why did the brown bear evolve into the polar bear? Animation describing how brown bears adapted to life in the Arctic. Sam, a young tortoise, is hungry. Grandad Charlie tells him a story about how brown bears had to travel a long distance to find food. A group of brown bears went to a region which was cold and inhabited by seals living on ice. The bears were hungry but their paws weren't good for walking on snow and ice, their fur wasn't thick enough for the cold conditions and the seals could easily see them coming with their brown fur. After a long, long time, some bears were born with bigger, thicker paws and with warmer, lighter-coloured fur. These were the bears which flourished. They are now called polar bears.
Views: 16205 Lammas Science
Uses of Waves
 
05:19
BBC KS4 Curriculum Bites Unit looking at topics in the double science curriculum, broken down into short chunks. Disc 033/ 2008
Views: 3567 Lammas Science
Radioactivity
 
06:37
BBC KS4 Curriculum Bites Unit looking at topics in the double science curriculum, broken down into short chunks. Disc 033/ 2008
Views: 16231 Lammas Science
Weathering and erosion - Freeze thaw weathering
 
01:21
Weathering and erosion - The Grand Canyon
Views: 151889 Lammas Science
12  What is the biggest bird in the world
 
04:23
Just So Darwin What is the biggest bird in the world? Animation explaining that although the ostrich cannot fly, it has good eyesight and can run fast to evade a predator. Sam, a young tortoise, is alarmed by a huge bird which flies overhead. Grandad Charlie tells him a story about ostriches. A mother ostrich had a nest of eggs. An egg went missing and rolled into the nest of a guinea fowl. When it hatched, Ollie the ostrich was different from the other chicks - he grew bigger, had messy feathers and a long neck. Ollie's feathers were too small to fly. However, Ollie could run really fast and had great eyesight. Eventually Mother guinea fowl realised Ollie was an ostrich and took him back to his real mother. Ollie's mother told him that a long time ago ostriches could fly but as they became bigger, they couldn't get off the ground, so they had to learn to run fast instead.
Views: 5625 Lammas Science
2  Why is a trunk useful to an elephant
 
04:24
Just so Darwin Why is a trunk useful to an elephant? Animation describing all the ways in which an elephant uses his trunk. Sam, a young tortoise, asks Grandad Charlie for a bedtime story about the elephant's trunk. Grandad tells the story of a father elephant teaching Junior, a young elephant, about all the things he could do with his trunk. Elephants use their trunks to reach leaves on tall trees, to drink and to wash. Trumpeting helps to frighten off predators such as lions, and elephants can even use their trunks to help them breathe when they are underwater.
Views: 21413 Lammas Science
10  What is camouflage
 
04:24
Just So Darwin What is camouflage? This animation describes how animals can use camouflage to 'hide' or 'seek' in their environment. Grandad Charlie, an elderly tortoise, is playing hide and seek with his grandson Sam. He tells Sam a story about some animals who took part in the world hide and seek contest. The seeker was Clouded Leopard and the finalists were Chameleon, Moon Moth, Flying Gecko and Stick Insect. Flying Gecko was caught first in mid-air. Chameleon was caught using his tongue to catch a fly on Snow Leopard's head. Moon Moth flew to the moon and was caught. Stick Insect hid among the twigs and won the contest.
Views: 34146 Lammas Science
BBC Short Circuit Polymers (and Crude Oil) S082LS24
 
18:44
Polymers Polymers are easily made and moulded. What is their future as waste piles up in landfill? 1. Where do we get plastics from? Which fractions are plastics made from? Hint: Draw a diagram, internet research for pictures of oil refinery 2. Explain the chemistry of cracking. Keywords: alkane, alkene, bonds, polymerisation 3. Explain polymerisation. Keywords: double bonds, ethene, polyethene, catalyst 4. Why are these molecules so flexible? 5. Why are the molecules cooled down? Draw a diagram if possible. Keyword: Thermoplastic 6. List a few uses. 7. List a few properties of plastics. 8. What is difference between thermoplastics and thermosets? 9. What can you make from polythene? Does it have limitations? 10. What happens if your process it? Can you change its properties? How? 11. List and discuss a few environmental issues. What can we do? What shouldn’t we do? 12. Discuss Plastic recycling. Which type is best??
Views: 7830 Lammas Science
Science Bank Atomic Structure (17) S092LBCHY
 
14:30
the structure of the atom, including the proton, electron and neutron/ the meaning and use of the terms atomic number and mass number/ the arrangement of electrons in the first 18 atoms.
Views: 41328 Lammas Science
9  Which plants can store water in the desert
 
04:30
Just So Darwin Which plants can store water in the desert? Animation describing how a cactus can store water. Grandad Charlie, an elderly tortoise, and his grandson Sam are caught in a rain storm. Grandad Charlie and Sam pass the time with a story about the cactus, a popular and unusual plant. A family of woodpeckers is blown into the desert by a storm and get lost. The desert becomes dry and very hot. A scorpion and a lizard tell the woodpeckers they need to find a cactus as they contain water and insects. Mother woodpecker finds a cactus and the family have a drink. Grandad Charlie explains a cactus is like a big water tank holding lots of rainwater and has a waxy skin to stop the water evaporating in the sun. Woodpeckers which eat the fruit help more cacti to grow by spreading the seeds.
Views: 38565 Lammas Science
Reversable Reactions
 
04:48
BBC Bitesize AQA Additional Science
Views: 3709 Lammas Science
Endothermic and Exthomeric Reactions
 
03:41
BBC Bitesize Top 20 Demos
Views: 3610 Lammas Science
States of Matter - Boiling Points
 
02:51
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 49742 Lammas Science
BBC iScience Evolution of Eye
 
04:54
A fun, engaging and relevant programme, inspiring the viewer to consider the science within and how scientific process can be used to test ideas and develop theories, rather than just looking for a given answer to a known question. Aimed at Key Stage 4, but can also be used by teachers and pupils at Key Stage 3 and beyond Key Stage 4
Views: 3056 Lammas Science
Science Bank Body Parts (22) S092LBBIO
 
14:26
the structure of the lungs/ exchange of gas in the lungs/ ventilation of the lungs/ the structure of the heart/ how the heart works as a pump/ the different structure of arteries and veins/ the role of the skeleton in providing support, protection and anchorage for muscles/ the importance of bone marrow/ the importance of calcium in giving strength to bones.
Views: 829321 Lammas Science
Search Out Space
 
19:21
Search Out Science Special
Views: 8875 Lammas Science
Scientific Eye Diet & Nutrition S111LS02
 
18:58
1. Why do people like to eat junk food? 2. What can happen in the future if you have a poor diet? 3. What are the seven main nutrients needed? 4. What can’t the footballers eat? 5. Why do you need carbohydrates? 6. What are the two types of carbohydrates? 7. Types of foods high in carbohydrates? 8. Why are simple sugars bad for you? 9. What are the two types of fats? 10. Which diseases can high fat levels contribute? 11. What is protein used for? 12. How can vegetarians get their protein? 13. What is fibre used for? 14. Where can you get fibre from? 15. What can fibre protect you from? 16. Why do you need minerals? 17. Where can you get calcium from? 18. What can low calcium levels lead to? 19. Where can you get iron from? 20. Why do we need iron? 21. What can a low level iron lead to? 22. How much of your body is made up of water? 23. How about your brain?
Views: 8146 Lammas Science
The Edward Jenner Story
 
02:38
B1 How Organisms Work/- Y8 Species at War/ Disease
Views: 4231 Lammas Science
BBC Short Circuit Pressure
 
19:23
Pressure A reconstruction of a scuba diving incident in which a woman was almost killed by pressure
Views: 5074 Lammas Science
Discovery of Photosynthesis
 
02:21
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 2699 Lammas Science
5. Variation, Classification and Inheritance BBC18LS05
 
15:25
BBC Bitesize KS3 Revision Foundation (3-5) Tape 18
Views: 38733 Lammas Science
6  Why does the giraffe have a long neck
 
04:29
Just So Darwin Why does the giraffe have a long neck? Animation describing how and why giraffes have developed such long necks. Sam, a young tortoise, wishes he had a longer neck to reach the nicest leaves. Grandad Charlie tells Sam a story about giraffes. Long ago, giraffes didn't have long necks. They wanted to eat the higher leaves but had to compete with elephants and antelopes for the lower leaves. One day, a giraffe was born with a slightly longer neck. She could reach the food and the juicy leaves. When she had young, some of them also had longer necks and they too were better at reaching for food. Over many years, other giraffes were born with longer necks. These giraffes survived better than the giraffes with the shorter necks, and eventually all of the giraffes had long necks.
Views: 69722 Lammas Science
Radioactive Metal Tracers
 
03:32
CH4 Clipbank: JG446249 Detecting Radiation
Views: 2523 Lammas Science
Drug Trials
 
10:22
Video clips for the classroom looking at how science is used in the modern world. The programme includes items on the use of ultraviolet light in eye surgery, the ethics of drug trials and how chemistry can help cure smelly socks. Disc 014/ BBC KS4 Class Clips
Views: 5989 Lammas Science
007 James Bond Moonraker Freefall
 
03:14
P2 1.6 Terminal Velocity
Views: 2169 Lammas Science
Forces and Motion - Bungee Jumping
 
05:12
Clipbank video learning resources. Extracted from educational programmes for secondary schools aired on Channel 4.
Views: 4846 Lammas Science
Enzymes
 
04:19
BBC Bitesize AQA Additional Science
Views: 2377 Lammas Science
11  Why is Lonesome George so lonely
 
04:29
Just So Darwin Why is Lonesome George so lonely? Animation telling the story of Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island tortoise in existence. Grandad Charlie, an elderly tortoise, takes his grandson Sam to visit Lonesome George. Lonesome George tells Sam a story to explain why he is lonely. Once there were many tortoises on the island, but then sailing ships arrived. The sailors and settlers needed food. Some of them caught and ate the tortoises. The ships also brought goats which ate the plants, so there was not enough food left for the tortoises to eat. The ships brought dogs, some of which also ate the tortoises, and the ship's rats fed on tortoise eggs. Before long almost every tortoise had gone and the island was changed forever. Fewer and fewer tortoises had babies, until only George was left. George tells Sam that when he dies, tortoises like him will become extinct.
Views: 7635 Lammas Science
Core and Skin Temperature
 
02:31
CH4 Clipbank: JG446230 Blood Sugar, Body Temp and Water Regulation
Views: 1884 Lammas Science
Weathering BBC19LS06
 
04:55
BBC Bitesize KS3 Revision Higher (5-7) Tape 19
Views: 13966 Lammas Science
Atoms, Molecules, Elements and Compounds
 
09:19
wan2tlk science
Views: 325390 Lammas Science
BBC iScience Acid Rain
 
04:50
A fun, engaging and relevant programme, inspiring the viewer to consider the science within and how scientific process can be used to test ideas and develop theories, rather than just looking for a given answer to a known question. Aimed at Key Stage 4, but can also be used by teachers and pupils at Key Stage 3 and beyond Key Stage 4
Views: 151968 Lammas Science
Types of Wave
 
03:49
CH4 Clipbank: JG446249 Types of Waves
Views: 16767 Lammas Science
Osmosis
 
03:44
BBC Bitesize Top 20 Demos
Views: 3431 Lammas Science
Science Bank Reactions and Energy Changes (12) S092LBCHY
 
14:28
exothermic and endothermic reactions/ the energy transfer involved in chemical reactions/ measuring reaction rates/ reaction rates by varying temperature or concentration, or by adding a catalyst.
Views: 5989 Lammas Science
Chemistry in Forensics
 
13:56
Ideal for KS4 science students, this video looks at two murder investigations and uncovers the chemistry behind the forensic testing that helped resolve the cases. Ten-year-old Damilola Taylor died after being attacked by a gang and receiving fatal leg wounds. Chantel Taylor, whose body has never been found, was originally a missing person but investigations revealed she was murdered. Lead forensic scientists explain how a GCMS (Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer) helped establish the death of Chantel Taylor, while re-examined evidence and DNA profiling helped in the Damilola Taylor case. Advanced chemical screening techniques, the Kastle Meyer test and the use of Luminol, used at crime scenes can assist investigators in identifying traces of blood. Here, the techniques are explained and demonstrated.
Views: 7346 Lammas Science
Enzymes
 
02:40
BBC Bitesize Top 20 Demos
Views: 1680 Lammas Science
3  Why do tortoises look different in different parts of the world
 
04:29
Just So Darwin Why do tortoises look different in different parts of the world? Animation describing how different tortoises have developed different characteristics. Sam, a young tortoise, asks Grandad Charlie if tortoises all look the same. Grandad Charlie tells Sam why some tortoises look different. Long ago, tortoises living on an island with plenty of food all looked the same. Sometimes tortoises went to different islands where food was scarce and higher up from the ground, so it was more difficult for them to reach. After a long time, some tortoises were born with longer legs and necks, allowing them to feed more easily. Some had shells which were a different shape to allow them to stretch upwards. These tortoises survived the best. On other islands, there was plenty of food and water and no predators, so tortoises here could grow very large. Some of their young were born bigger and over many generations they became giant tortoises.
Views: 6226 Lammas Science
1. Life Processes and Cell Activity BBC18LS01
 
09:32
BBC Bitesize KS3 Revision Foundation (3-5) Tape 18
Views: 7744 Lammas Science
G42LS05 Homeostasis (Better Quality)
 
19:26
The New Living Body
Views: 7347 Lammas Science